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Anxious about architecture degree

I'm starting my architecture degree in two weeks. I'm very nervous because I want to study architecture but I'm scared I will struggle. The only thing I can really do is draw, but I'm ok at it and don't draw all the time. I'm not really familiar with CAD software, and even though I have used them in school, I've never used them enough to do complex designs. I like projects but I always struggle because I'm indecisive and I feel like I'm never creative enough. I do want to do architecture, however, but does anyone have any advice on what I can do to be more prepared and the things I will need. It will be much appreciated.
Hi Sey! I’m about to start my second year of architecture so hope I can be of some help. A degree is all about learning, nobody expects you to know it all before you join - they simply expect you to be open minded, driven to learn, enthusiastic about the subject and have some minimal prior knowledge about it. Try and see if your university has provided a reading list (but don’t worry, these are almost always optional). If not, let me know and I can give some good book recommendations. You will find that across the people in your year, skillsets and knowledge will be incredibly varied. You will meet people who haven’t got a grip on hand drawing and then others who will have done work experience, have family in the field etc. This is to be expected and surrounding yourself with those more experienced than you is really refreshing and provides new challenges. You may find some people who have a very clear preference/style/agenda but these type of people don’t always do the best marks-wise as the university likes to shape individuals with their own ethos and design styles etc. The fact you can draw is already great, I now recommend some quick pre-reading and maybe looking at articles to get a grip of current architectural trends and affairs. All the best to you starting your degree!
Hi, I am thinking of doing architecture at uni next year. I have not created a portfolio or taken art as an a-level so i am not really sure what I need to do to prepare myself.
Reply 3
Original post by sunanon
Hi Sey! I’m about to start my second year of architecture so hope I can be of some help. A degree is all about learning, nobody expects you to know it all before you join - they simply expect you to be open minded, driven to learn, enthusiastic about the subject and have some minimal prior knowledge about it. Try and see if your university has provided a reading list (but don’t worry, these are almost always optional). If not, let me know and I can give some good book recommendations. You will find that across the people in your year, skillsets and knowledge will be incredibly varied. You will meet people who haven’t got a grip on hand drawing and then others who will have done work experience, have family in the field etc. This is to be expected and surrounding yourself with those more experienced than you is really refreshing and provides new challenges. You may find some people who have a very clear preference/style/agenda but these type of people don’t always do the best marks-wise as the university likes to shape individuals with their own ethos and design styles etc. The fact you can draw is already great, I now recommend some quick pre-reading and maybe looking at articles to get a grip of current architectural trends and affairs. All the best to you starting your degree!


Thank you so much. I would appreciate if you could give me good book recommendations if you can.
Reply 4
Original post by Mario2005
Hi, I am thinking of doing architecture at uni next year. I have not created a portfolio or taken art as an a-level so i am not really sure what I need to do to prepare myself.

You can take Product Design or Media if you can. Product Design is essentially what it says "Product Design" and you constantly have to draw, make models and take pictures, which you record and put into a portfolio at the end of your project. That helps in making a portfolio, doesn't necessary have to be all art. Media is more about software design like Photoshop and Animation, as well as essay writing which shows you have good creative and CAD skills and the ability to write an essay I guess. If you don't take any of those subjects, I guess you can just do drawings from different perspectives, or maybe make models at home or on CAD.
Original post by sunanon
Hi Sey! I’m about to start my second year of architecture so hope I can be of some help. A degree is all about learning, nobody expects you to know it all before you join - they simply expect you to be open minded, driven to learn, enthusiastic about the subject and have some minimal prior knowledge about it. Try and see if your university has provided a reading list (but don’t worry, these are almost always optional). If not, let me know and I can give some good book recommendations. You will find that across the people in your year, skillsets and knowledge will be incredibly varied. You will meet people who haven’t got a grip on hand drawing and then others who will have done work experience, have family in the field etc. This is to be expected and surrounding yourself with those more experienced than you is really refreshing and provides new challenges. You may find some people who have a very clear preference/style/agenda but these type of people don’t always do the best marks-wise as the university likes to shape individuals with their own ethos and design styles etc. The fact you can draw is already great, I now recommend some quick pre-reading and maybe looking at articles to get a grip of current architectural trends and affairs. All the best to you starting your degree!

Hiya I am thinking of applying this january for architecture. if you could reply to this with some book recomendations it would be greatly appreciated:smile:
Original post by Sey2029
Thank you so much. I would appreciate if you could give me good book recommendations if you can.


Original post by emmacorreia
Hiya I am thinking of applying this january for architecture. if you could reply to this with some book recomendations it would be greatly appreciated:smile:

Sorry I'm so late to this. Here are some recommendations:

A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain by Owen Hatherly
- A really interesting critical take on modern British architecture

50 Architecture Ideas You Really Need to Know by Philip Wilkinson
- A great introduction to architectural movements for those who haven't explored history yet

The Fundamentals of Architecture by Lorraine Farrelly
- Great, concise introduction to basic architectural principles (relevant to design studio work), worth skipping the history section if you read the former book

Species of Spaces by Georges Perec
- This one pops up on Cambridge reading lists. Not inherently architectural, but a really beautiful set of personal essays on the characteristics of spaces

How to Thrive at Architecture School by Neil Spiller
- This one is a fun one, as it takes you through all the different routes of gaining accreditation and shows you examples of student work in different years and how years at architecture school are typically spent

I haven't read it yet, but The Eyes of the Skin by Juhani Pallasmaa is a revered book in high architectural education.
Original post by sunanon
Sorry I'm so late to this. Here are some recommendations:

A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain by Owen Hatherly
- A really interesting critical take on modern British architecture

50 Architecture Ideas You Really Need to Know by Philip Wilkinson
- A great introduction to architectural movements for those who haven't explored history yet

The Fundamentals of Architecture by Lorraine Farrelly
- Great, concise introduction to basic architectural principles (relevant to design studio work), worth skipping the history section if you read the former book

Species of Spaces by Georges Perec
- This one pops up on Cambridge reading lists. Not inherently architectural, but a really beautiful set of personal essays on the characteristics of spaces

How to Thrive at Architecture School by Neil Spiller
- This one is a fun one, as it takes you through all the different routes of gaining accreditation and shows you examples of student work in different years and how years at architecture school are typically spent

I haven't read it yet, but The Eyes of the Skin by Juhani Pallasmaa is a revered book in high architectural education.


It’s not late bro
It’ll surely be useful
🇳🇬 ❤️

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