The Student Room Group

End of year 12, wanted to do Vet Med, now reconsidering

So, some background information. I do: Bio, Chem and Psychology. I am predicted A*,A,A*. For the majority of Yr 12, I decided the best option I had was to become a vet. It wasn't an aspiration I've had for a long time. I didn't and still don't have an aspiration for any particular course. At the start of Year 12 I sort of chose it on the basis of process of elimination (stupidly enough.) I didn't want to go through the hassle of sitting the UKAT (ik stupid) and I thought it seemed better and easier to get into than dentistry and medicine. I did my EPQ on a vet related theme and have done work experience. But a week before year 13 starts here I am seriously reconsidering.

After doing clinical work experience, I interacted with a vet. And to put it frankly her life seems miserable. She told me about how she worked 20hrs overtime, long hours and poor pay. Sure I've heard this all before, but it's really hit me like a ton of bricks and now I'm reconsidering everything. I'm thinking about the future implications of becoming a vet and whether I'm prepared to throw myself into that lifestyle. What about my family, having my own family etc. How will I have the time or the funds for things like that. I'm also a brown girl and there is a lack of rep in the vet industry. It seems like it'll be isolating. Upon doing more reading it seems people regret becoming vets, and the financial aspect of it is seriously worrying me. It seems like it's not worth becoming a vet.

Now I don't know what to do. I have felt so stressed out this week and I've been crying constantly. I feel like perhaps I need more time to consider the best career for me and give it more thought. Now, I have no clue what degree would be the best for me. Law, Dentistry etc. etc. now I'm back to square one.

Do I not apply this year and consider something else and apply for uni for 2024? I'm just worried I still won't have decided what's best for me by the end of year 13.

Do I apply this year and say F it?

Do I consider taking a different A-level and broaden future options? (I'm not sure about this, somebody did recommend I do this, but I'm not sure if I mentally can endure another year of college.)

Scroll to see replies

Bio, Chem and Psychology are strong a-levels and given your predicted grade, science appears to be your strength. I would hesitate to advise you to start over.

Would you consider a more "general" science course such as Biochemistry, Biomedical Science, Zoology? That doesn't restrict you to any kind of career and you may discover what you want to do over the course of that.

Otherwise, take your time. You don't need to rush to uni at 18. I know it's the done thing but there's no harm taking your time, getting some work experience (whether relevant or not) and applying once you've got a firmer view of what you want to do.
Original post by SpannersVC
Bio, Chem and Psychology are strong a-levels and given your predicted grade, science appears to be your strength. I would hesitate to advise you to start over.

Would you consider a more "general" science course such as Biochemistry, Biomedical Science, Zoology? That doesn't restrict you to any kind of career and you may discover what you want to do over the course of that.

Otherwise, take your time. You don't need to rush to uni at 18. I know it's the done thing but there's no harm taking your time, getting some work experience (whether relevant or not) and applying once you've got a firmer view of what you want to do.


I don't know, I feel like I don't know enough about these general courses and the sort of options they give me for the future... It's something I'd have to do further research into :/
Speaking from experience, best to apply anyway since you've done the work I assume, then take the time after applying / interviews to research and think about what you truly want to do, and if you truly do not want to pursue vet med.

If you have decided vet med isn't for you, and you decide on a course that doesn't require work experience / a lotta research like medicine / dentistry then you still have time to pick a course, for both October and January.

You COULD theoretically apply for medicine if you use all the time you have until October 15th but I'd advise against applying this year - medicine is a big commitment to make and I doubt you'd be ready in time if you were scared off by the UCAT.

This is all assuming you are academically sound, which I think you are based on your predicted grades.

Wish you the best of luck!
Original post by iqyster xx
I don't know, I feel like I don't know enough about these general courses and the sort of options they give me for the future... It's something I'd have to do further research into :/


Most courses are very broad - physics / bio degrees can get you into software dev roles for example, so don't worry too much about prospects if you aren't sure, but whether you enjoy the subject or not. I suggest you choose a degree that opens more doors in your case though.

Whatever you do, don't stress! Stressing won't turn back time, and you won't regret your gap year if it gives you time to choose.
Original post by blabla2020202
Speaking from experience, best to apply anyway since you've done the work I assume, then take the time after applying / interviews to research and think about what you truly want to do, and if you truly do not want to pursue vet med.

If you have decided vet med isn't for you, and you decide on a course that doesn't require work experience / a lotta research like medicine / dentistry then you still have time to pick a course, for both October and January.

You COULD theoretically apply for medicine if you use all the time you have until October 15th but I'd advise against applying this year - medicine is a big commitment to make and I doubt you'd be ready in time if you were scared off by the UCAT.

This is all assuming you are academically sound, which I think you are based on your predicted grades.

Wish you the best of luck!

I have considered applying anyway, and potentially turn down offers, but I'm worried how it'd impact my record.
Let's say hypothetically I apply for vet med and turn it down this year, but then apply for something like dentistry... Assuming it goes terribly, and I don't get into dentistry, I may want to just return to vet med anyway. But how would it look after rejecting vet med, then applying to dentistry only to full circle and come back to it...
Original post by blabla2020202
Most courses are very broad - physics / bio degrees can get you into software dev roles for example, so don't worry too much about prospects if you aren't sure, but whether you enjoy the subject or not. I suggest you choose a degree that opens more doors in your case though.

Whatever you do, don't stress! Stressing won't turn back time, and you won't regret your gap year if it gives you time to choose.

Thanks, that's reassured me immensely.
Sure, there's always the broad options, but what would be your opinions on applying to something more specialised instead like dentistry for instance as opposed to vet med?
Original post by iqyster xx
I have considered applying anyway, and potentially turn down offers, but I'm worried how it'd impact my record.
Let's say hypothetically I apply for vet med and turn it down this year, but then apply for something like dentistry... Assuming it goes terribly, and I don't get into dentistry, I may want to just return to vet med anyway. But how would it look after rejecting vet med, then applying to dentistry only to full circle and come back to it...


That's why you take the time after applying to think about whether vet med is for you or not. Don't overthink it. Don't quote me on this, but rejecting offers aren't going to tarnish your application.
Original post by iqyster xx
Thanks, that's reassured me immensely.
Sure, there's always the broad options, but what would be your opinions on applying to something more specialised instead like dentistry for instance as opposed to vet med?


For vocational courses like medicine, dentistry (where you know what job you'll end up in) I suggest you take a gap year and get the relevant work experience. Dentistry has a better work-life balance, but medicine is much broader with uncountable specialities (neurologist, neurosurgeon, consultant ... so many to choose!). Both are competitive, so make sure if you do choose a vocational course, that you know what you are getting into.

If the pay and long working hours of a vet (I didn't know they had long working hours to be honest!) put you off, then that would concern me as medicine has the same problem.
Oh and speak to your careers advisor as school if you have one! I wish I did, I thought it didn't help me at first but it's good to talk to someone about your concerns regarding the future.
Reply 10
Original post by iqyster xx
So, some background information. I do: Bio, Chem and Psychology. I am predicted A*,A,A*. For the majority of Yr 12, I decided the best option I had was to become a vet. It wasn't an aspiration I've had for a long time. I didn't and still don't have an aspiration for any particular course. At the start of Year 12 I sort of chose it on the basis of process of elimination (stupidly enough.) I didn't want to go through the hassle of sitting the UKAT (ik stupid) and I thought it seemed better and easier to get into than dentistry and medicine. I did my EPQ on a vet related theme and have done work experience. But a week before year 13 starts here I am seriously reconsidering.

After doing clinical work experience, I interacted with a vet. And to put it frankly her life seems miserable. She told me about how she worked 20hrs overtime, long hours and poor pay. Sure I've heard this all before, but it's really hit me like a ton of bricks and now I'm reconsidering everything. I'm thinking about the future implications of becoming a vet and whether I'm prepared to throw myself into that lifestyle. What about my family, having my own family etc. How will I have the time or the funds for things like that. I'm also a brown girl and there is a lack of rep in the vet industry. It seems like it'll be isolating. Upon doing more reading it seems people regret becoming vets, and the financial aspect of it is seriously worrying me. It seems like it's not worth becoming a vet.

Now I don't know what to do. I have felt so stressed out this week and I've been crying constantly. I feel like perhaps I need more time to consider the best career for me and give it more thought. Now, I have no clue what degree would be the best for me. Law, Dentistry etc. etc. now I'm back to square one.

Do I not apply this year and consider something else and apply for uni for 2024? I'm just worried I still won't have decided what's best for me by the end of year 13.

Do I apply this year and say F it?

Do I consider taking a different A-level and broaden future options? (I'm not sure about this, somebody did recommend I do this, but I'm not sure if I mentally can endure another year of college.)

I think you’ve initially chosen veterinary medicine for the wrong reasons. Reasons which aren’t actually true, since it’s more competitive despite not having an entrance exam. You didn’t have a true enthusiasm for it and that is why the reality of the profession has caused you to feel like this.

It could be that you saw a crappy practice that doesn’t care for their vets. Maybe try and go to another practice or speak to more vets about their experiences.

Doctors get slightly better pay than vets, but the hours are as bad if not worse. That leaves dentistry, which I don’t really know much about, but considering it involves working in the NHS and looking into people’s mouths all day every day I guess it’s not much better. I’ve heard there’s a lot of money to be made in private practice, so maybe that’s an option for you.

Your worries about having a family I feel are unique to working women, not just the healthcare industry. That said, there are plenty of vets who have had children. It is doable.

Since you’ve done all the work, you may as well go ahead and apply. Sit on the thought of veterinary medicine whilst you wait to hear back from your applications. Offers or no offers, you will still have the option of a gap year which I think would be best in your situation, to get to figure out what you really want to do.

I don’t think you need to do more A levels as the ones you’ve got give you good options in terms of biology-related and healthcare degrees.

Also, if you do end up in vet school, there likely will be a veterinary diversity society. You can also apply to IVC Evidensia’s Ethnic Diversity Scholarship that they offer to vet students of minority ethnic background. This offers financial support along with the chance to meet other minority ethnic scholars.
Original post by iqyster xx
Thanks, that's reassured me immensely.
Sure, there's always the broad options, but what would be your opinions on applying to something more specialised instead like dentistry for instance as opposed to vet med?

I think for dentistry, like vet med, you need to be pretty sure that's what you want to spend your life doing. Dentistry is 5 years I'm guessing? That's a lot of time and money to find out you hate looking after people's teeth (sorry if I sound glib, I don't mean to) It's a degree that really only has one pathway following it. I would recommend before pursuing something extremely specialised that you do what you did with vet med and get some work experience and shadowing and really find out about it. Better than than just do it because you feel you have to and then being unhappy.
Original post by SpannersVC
I think for dentistry, like vet med, you need to be pretty sure that's what you want to spend your life doing. Dentistry is 5 years I'm guessing? That's a lot of time and money to find out you hate looking after people's teeth (sorry if I sound glib, I don't mean to) It's a degree that really only has one pathway following it. I would recommend before pursuing something extremely specialised that you do what you did with vet med and get some work experience and shadowing and really find out about it. Better than than just do it because you feel you have to and then being unhappy.


That's very true, I don't want to end up in the same boat again wondering if dentistry is the right choice...
Original post by AHB27
I think you’ve initially chosen veterinary medicine for the wrong reasons. Reasons which aren’t actually true, since it’s more competitive despite not having an entrance exam. You didn’t have a true enthusiasm for it and that is why the reality of the profession has caused you to feel like this.

It could be that you saw a crappy practice that doesn’t care for their vets. Maybe try and go to another practice or speak to more vets about their experiences.

Doctors get slightly better pay than vets, but the hours are as bad if not worse. That leaves dentistry, which I don’t really know much about, but considering it involves working in the NHS and looking into people’s mouths all day every day I guess it’s not much better. I’ve heard there’s a lot of money to be made in private practice, so maybe that’s an option for you.

Your worries about having a family I feel are unique to working women, not just the healthcare industry. That said, there are plenty of vets who have had children. It is doable.

Since you’ve done all the work, you may as well go ahead and apply. Sit on the thought of veterinary medicine whilst you wait to hear back from your applications. Offers or no offers, you will still have the option of a gap year which I think would be best in your situation, to get to figure out what you really want to do.

I don’t think you need to do more A levels as the ones you’ve got give you good options in terms of biology-related and healthcare degrees.

Also, if you do end up in vet school, there likely will be a veterinary diversity society. You can also apply to IVC Evidensia’s Ethnic Diversity Scholarship that they offer to vet students of minority ethnic background. This offers financial support along with the chance to meet other minority ethnic scholars.

I think this may be the best option for me. Perhaps I'll apply, while in the meanwhile I'll seriously consider if it's what I want to do. In terms of other options, what are your opinions on doing a less specialised degree, like biomed etc.
You are predicted to get good A Level grades so I wouldn't consider changing them unless you absolutely have to. They're useful and you will be able to apply to many courses with them should you decide to change careers. Of course, if you end up specifically needing English or something then do change them but if you aren't sure yet then it's probably best to just stick with them as the sciences are very applicable to many fields, and you don't want to end up doing another year at college when you didn't need to.

Ultimately, being a vet can be rubbish. But it can also be very rewarding. Not every vet clinic will make you work these long hours and the pay isn't always terrible. Having said that, it is quite common in our industry to experience these things: in about 2019ish, an article was published that found more than 20% of vets were seriously considering leaving the profession soon.
My favourite thing about veterinary medicine for me is the diversity in careers. You can be a general small animal vet and make a difference to many families and their pet's lives. You can be a farm vet and actually get to work outside in all weathers and a variety of settings. You can be a veterinary specialist where you do extra training in one area and then work in a hospital on complicated cases - the pay for this kind of work is usually much better. If you still want something completely different you can work in a laboratory research facility where animals are used, supervising their welfare. You can even work more office-based jobs for the government advising for public health (the work-life balance would probably be a lot better for a role like this).
So is it 'not worth' becoming a vet? Well that depends on who you are. If you genuinely like the job role - performing surgeries, seeing patients, decision making etc. then there is no reason that you can't become a vet and apply to jobs where you can set strict boundaries on your work-life balance.

I'll also add that almost every vet I have ever met (which are mostly women) have children. The pay isn't great for the amount of work we do (and how difficult it is) but is definitely livable and you can always get extra qualifications to help increase this. Unfortunately however, if pay is one of the main things you care about then this is not the job for you. Being a vet is rewarding in ways other than just compensation and the job is quite emotionally draining - there are much easier jobs that pay more to be completely honest.
Putting aside the hours and pay - did you like the clinic environment? Did you enjoy watching the surgeries, working with patients etc? If so, maybe it is worth getting some more placements done at other clinics to see what it is like. You may have just gone to a really poorly managed clinic. We are expected to see any end-of-day emergencies that come in, however 20 hours of overtime certainly is not the norm.

You don't have to figure out what is best for you by the end of Year 13. Almost no one knows. Some people don't even figure out their career until they're in their 30s. I actually took two gap years before I got into vet school. Take your time before rushing into vet, law, dentistry etc. If you apply without being sure, you might feel pressured to take your place and then end up doing something which is completely not right for you. One thing for sure is that veterinary isn't for everyone. You have already seen that the job can be tough and I wouldn't want you to rush into that.

If there are any more specific concerns or worries you have feel free to ask me any questions. I hope you figure it out. :smile:
Original post by louisvbird
You are predicted to get good A Level grades so I wouldn't consider changing them unless you absolutely have to. They're useful and you will be able to apply to many courses with them should you decide to change careers. Of course, if you end up specifically needing English or something then do change them but if you aren't sure yet then it's probably best to just stick with them as the sciences are very applicable to many fields, and you don't want to end up doing another year at college when you didn't need to.

Ultimately, being a vet can be rubbish. But it can also be very rewarding. Not every vet clinic will make you work these long hours and the pay isn't always terrible. Having said that, it is quite common in our industry to experience these things: in about 2019ish, an article was published that found more than 20% of vets were seriously considering leaving the profession soon.
My favourite thing about veterinary medicine for me is the diversity in careers. You can be a general small animal vet and make a difference to many families and their pet's lives. You can be a farm vet and actually get to work outside in all weathers and a variety of settings. You can be a veterinary specialist where you do extra training in one area and then work in a hospital on complicated cases - the pay for this kind of work is usually much better. If you still want something completely different you can work in a laboratory research facility where animals are used, supervising their welfare. You can even work more office-based jobs for the government advising for public health (the work-life balance would probably be a lot better for a role like this).
So is it 'not worth' becoming a vet? Well that depends on who you are. If you genuinely like the job role - performing surgeries, seeing patients, decision making etc. then there is no reason that you can't become a vet and apply to jobs where you can set strict boundaries on your work-life balance.

I'll also add that almost every vet I have ever met (which are mostly women) have children. The pay isn't great for the amount of work we do (and how difficult it is) but is definitely livable and you can always get extra qualifications to help increase this. Unfortunately however, if pay is one of the main things you care about then this is not the job for you. Being a vet is rewarding in ways other than just compensation and the job is quite emotionally draining - there are much easier jobs that pay more to be completely honest.
Putting aside the hours and pay - did you like the clinic environment? Did you enjoy watching the surgeries, working with patients etc? If so, maybe it is worth getting some more placements done at other clinics to see what it is like. You may have just gone to a really poorly managed clinic. We are expected to see any end-of-day emergencies that come in, however 20 hours of overtime certainly is not the norm.

You don't have to figure out what is best for you by the end of Year 13. Almost no one knows. Some people don't even figure out their career until they're in their 30s. I actually took two gap years before I got into vet school. Take your time before rushing into vet, law, dentistry etc. If you apply without being sure, you might feel pressured to take your place and then end up doing something which is completely not right for you. One thing for sure is that veterinary isn't for everyone. You have already seen that the job can be tough and I wouldn't want you to rush into that.

If there are any more specific concerns or worries you have feel free to ask me any questions. I hope you figure it out. :smile:


I quite enjoyed the clinical environment, more so than the husbandry work experience actually.
The tasks the vets did did not seem "too bad", and I could envision myself doing consulting and operating no problem. My only concern is that the pay and the hours aren't worth it. I know there is the option of specialising but I've heard that can be mentally and financially draining.
If you don't mind me asking- what do you work as, and what's your salary like?
Also, when you took your gap years when did you decide you wanted to become a vet?
Original post by iqyster xx
I quite enjoyed the clinical environment, more so than the husbandry work experience actually.
The tasks the vets did did not seem "too bad", and I could envision myself doing consulting and operating no problem. My only concern is that the pay and the hours aren't worth it. I know there is the option of specialising but I've heard that can be mentally and financially draining.
If you don't mind me asking- what do you work as, and what's your salary like?
Also, when you took your gap years when did you decide you wanted to become a vet?


The good news is that the profession is slowly getting better. With so many people leaving the career, employers are offering better rates and working conditions. There is no guarantee however that by the time you have qualified, the working life will be ideal for you. Some jobs recently are offering 4 or even 3 day working weeks with no out-of-hours. This is quite a good deal for what the salary is (in my opinion).

We are currently looking at a day-one starting salary of £27-35k in most parts of the country. This is actually quite good and comparable to new junior doctors I believe - someone correct me if I'm wrong. As time goes on you will get paid more with experience, but unfortunately it does not go as high as experienced doctors get. Jobs can go up to £60-70k (or more) but require lots of experience. Those who are willing to do on-call and night emergency work will get paid significantly more. Management roles, specialists and practice owners can get paid a lot although you would need quite a lot of experience, of course. What part of the country you work in will also make a difference - salary is better near London but living costs are also high.

I recommend you have a look on job websites to see what the vet jobs look like in your area and how much they get paid for the experience they have. You can find vet job postings on the internet. Just have a browse and see what is out there for you.

You keep mentioning it "not being worth it". The most important thing to note is that vets generally aren't struggling to pay bills. We have a satisfactory/ livable wage but we make up for it in doing rewarding work and saving animals' lives. This is worth it to me, but is it worth it to you? Almost every healthcare-related profession isn't worth it in terms of pay and hours alone - but becomes worth it when you consider the fact that you are doing very important work and making a difference in other's lives. If this is work you want to do, does pay matter that much? As long as I can pay the bills (which I can with the wage I'll get), I'm happy to do veterinary work. No amount of money is worth a job I simply don't enjoy. Does this apply to you?

I'm currently a vet student, not a vet (just yet). I took my A Levels in humanities subjects and once I received my grades I decided to go back to college to get qualified in sciences so that I could study Zoology. Whilst there, I realised I had actually wanted to be a vet since childhood and I used this science qualification to apply to vet school instead. I did lots of work experience and I even worked for an emergency overnight vet during my second gap year.

Hope this helps. :smile:
Original post by iqyster xx
So, some background information. I do: Bio, Chem and Psychology. I am predicted A*,A,A*. For the majority of Yr 12, I decided the best option I had was to become a vet. It wasn't an aspiration I've had for a long time. I didn't and still don't have an aspiration for any particular course. At the start of Year 12 I sort of chose it on the basis of process of elimination (stupidly enough.) I didn't want to go through the hassle of sitting the UKAT (ik stupid) and I thought it seemed better and easier to get into than dentistry and medicine. I did my EPQ on a vet related theme and have done work experience. But a week before year 13 starts here I am seriously reconsidering.

After doing clinical work experience, I interacted with a vet. And to put it frankly her life seems miserable. She told me about how she worked 20hrs overtime, long hours and poor pay. Sure I've heard this all before, but it's really hit me like a ton of bricks and now I'm reconsidering everything. I'm thinking about the future implications of becoming a vet and whether I'm prepared to throw myself into that lifestyle. What about my family, having my own family etc. How will I have the time or the funds for things like that. I'm also a brown girl and there is a lack of rep in the vet industry. It seems like it'll be isolating. Upon doing more reading it seems people regret becoming vets, and the financial aspect of it is seriously worrying me. It seems like it's not worth becoming a vet.

Now I don't know what to do. I have felt so stressed out this week and I've been crying constantly. I feel like perhaps I need more time to consider the best career for me and give it more thought. Now, I have no clue what degree would be the best for me. Law, Dentistry etc. etc. now I'm back to square one.

Do I not apply this year and consider something else and apply for uni for 2024? I'm just worried I still won't have decided what's best for me by the end of year 13.

Do I apply this year and say F it?

Do I consider taking a different A-level and broaden future options? (I'm not sure about this, somebody did recommend I do this, but I'm not sure if I mentally can endure another year of college.)


If your not ready to apply you can always not apply and wait till next cycle.

OR as you've done a lot of preparation you can apply, then always withdraw your application, then re-apply in 2023 for something else. If you get an offer and your not ready to decide you could always ask to defer although they may well say no (although if you get an offer, and they say no to defering this could put you in a tricky spot...)

If you want to go for a non vet/medical degree you might have clearing options if you end up withdrawing your application/not apply.
Another suggestion is to try and talk to a few more vets, if you haven’t already done this. It sounds like you may have been unduly influenced by one person who isn’t very happy. Not that I mean her opinion isn’t worth listening to - it may be a very real reality check - but it is worth trying to find out from other vets what they like and dislike about their work. Maybe try and reach out to vets in your area and tell them you are considering becoming one but you’d like to find out more. You’ll probably get quite a few rejections but with luck a few would be willing to chat, either in person or over the phone.
Original post by iqyster xx
So, some background information. I do: Bio, Chem and Psychology. I am predicted A*,A,A*. For the majority of Yr 12, I decided the best option I had was to become a vet. It wasn't an aspiration I've had for a long time. I didn't and still don't have an aspiration for any particular course. At the start of Year 12 I sort of chose it on the basis of process of elimination (stupidly enough.) I didn't want to go through the hassle of sitting the UKAT (ik stupid) and I thought it seemed better and easier to get into than dentistry and medicine. I did my EPQ on a vet related theme and have done work experience. But a week before year 13 starts here I am seriously reconsidering.

After doing clinical work experience, I interacted with a vet. And to put it frankly her life seems miserable. She told me about how she worked 20hrs overtime, long hours and poor pay. Sure I've heard this all before, but it's really hit me like a ton of bricks and now I'm reconsidering everything. I'm thinking about the future implications of becoming a vet and whether I'm prepared to throw myself into that lifestyle. What about my family, having my own family etc. How will I have the time or the funds for things like that. I'm also a brown girl and there is a lack of rep in the vet industry. It seems like it'll be isolating. Upon doing more reading it seems people regret becoming vets, and the financial aspect of it is seriously worrying me. It seems like it's not worth becoming a vet.

Now I don't know what to do. I have felt so stressed out this week and I've been crying constantly. I feel like perhaps I need more time to consider the best career for me and give it more thought. Now, I have no clue what degree would be the best for me. Law, Dentistry etc. etc. now I'm back to square one.

Do I not apply this year and consider something else and apply for uni for 2024? I'm just worried I still won't have decided what's best for me by the end of year 13.

Do I apply this year and say F it?

Do I consider taking a different A-level and broaden future options? (I'm not sure about this, somebody did recommend I do this, but I'm not sure if I mentally can endure another year of college.)

I'm a current vet student. I have always wanted to be a vet. It is a difficult course (similar study hours and content to a medical course). If I didn't love the course and want to be a vet there is absolutely no way I would be able to make it through the course let alone the career. What I recommend when people are unsure is to write down what you want out of a career.
e.g. desk job? practical job? physical job? what hours? do you want to be able to travel? what pay? do you want to help people on a personal level? etc that will narrow things down to show you what you might actually want to do.

Quick Reply