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New to A level

hi, I just started A level and I heard that people have to revise alot and are forced to revise during their frees and alot more after school.What exactly do u revise on?Do you just revise on content that hasn't been covered in class ? Or do you revise on content you keep forgetting or struggle to keep in your head?
Original post by cllarence10
hi, I just started A level and I heard that people have to revise alot and are forced to revise during their frees and alot more after school.What exactly do u revise on?Do you just revise on content that hasn't been covered in class ? Or do you revise on content you keep forgetting or struggle to keep in your head?


Depends on the school and probably whether you go to a sixth form or college. My old school were too involved imo for a Sixth Form (felt like I had more freedom in year 11 than I did in sixth form) and they made sure that you revised in your "Study Periods" (frees) e.g if you were caught playing cards for example in said "study periods" your cards would be confiscated. Essentially they wanted you to work in your frees and probably rightfully so. Honestly it's probably up to you on what you revise and whether you actually bother to revise in the first place. @CaptainDuckie or @Sinnoh might be able to give a better/proper answer.
Hello!

First off (and take this with a pinch of salt as every college/sixth form varies), students are not typically forced to revise during these times. It's certainly advised that you use your frees for independent study, but you'll find that now you're studying A levels, it will be a lot more independent, and it's now up to you to motivate yourself and to do your work.

I'm unsure of what you mean by your first question, are you perhaps able to reword it?

In terms of revision, it would be going over content you've just covered in class, however, a bit of pre-reading may help if you feel the need to do so. How you choose to revise is entirely your decision. Personally, I've found it effective to revise the topic areas in which I am struggling the most or do not entirely understand. You may also be revising for upcoming tests you will have throughout the year.

However, I would advise you don't worry about revision at this point too much as you've only just started the course, and so there will not actually be much content to revise, if that makes sense. Just make sure your notes are up to date, and if you do not understand anything, make sure you talk to your teacher about it ASAP so that they can make sure you understand.

You might find your frees initially useful for creating revision material on the topics you are currently studying, so that when it comes to revising for the actual exams, you already have the materials to have, and thus do not have to worry about making them.
Original post by Squiggles1238
Hello!

First off (and take this with a pinch of salt as every college/sixth form varies), students are not typically forced to revise during these times. It's certainly advised that you use your frees for independent study, but you'll find that now you're studying A levels, it will be a lot more independent, and it's now up to you to motivate yourself and to do your work.

I'm unsure of what you mean by your first question, are you perhaps able to reword it?

In terms of revision, it would be going over content you've just covered in class, however, a bit of pre-reading may help if you feel the need to do so. How you choose to revise is entirely your decision. Personally, I've found it effective to revise the topic areas in which I am struggling the most or do not entirely understand. You may also be revising for upcoming tests you will have throughout the year.

However, I would advise you don't worry about revision at this point too much as you've only just started the course, and so there will not actually be much content to revise, if that makes sense. Just make sure your notes are up to date, and if you do not understand anything, make sure you talk to your teacher about it ASAP so that they can make sure you understand.

You might find your frees initially useful for creating revision material on the topics you are currently studying, so that when it comes to revising for the actual exams, you already have the materials to have, and thus do not have to worry about making them.

Good points ^^^
When I did my A-levels I personally just used it to read around topics. For example: if I learnt mitosis, I would spend a good amount of time just reading around it - to gain a foundational understanding. Certain topics you cover at A-level expect you to have some sort of foundational understanding in order to understand more of it, I hope this makes sense.

Similarly, I read ahead on certain topics and any questions I had, I would write a long list of questions to ask my teacher during the lesson. Again, I found that this gathered conceptual understanding.

Original post by Talkative Toad
@CaptainDuckie might be able to give a better/proper answer.



thanks for the tag. :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Squiggles1238
Hello!

First off (and take this with a pinch of salt as every college/sixth form varies), students are not typically forced to revise during these times. It's certainly advised that you use your frees for independent study, but you'll find that now you're studying A levels, it will be a lot more independent, and it's now up to you to motivate yourself and to do your work.

I'm unsure of what you mean by your first question, are you perhaps able to reword it?

In terms of revision, it would be going over content you've just covered in class, however, a bit of pre-reading may help if you feel the need to do so. How you choose to revise is entirely your decision. Personally, I've found it effective to revise the topic areas in which I am struggling the most or do not entirely understand. You may also be revising for upcoming tests you will have throughout the year.

However, I would advise you don't worry about revision at this point too much as you've only just started the course, and so there will not actually be much content to revise, if that makes sense. Just make sure your notes are up to date, and if you do not understand anything, make sure you talk to your teacher about it ASAP so that they can make sure you understand.

You might find your frees initially useful for creating revision material on the topics you are currently studying, so that when it comes to revising for the actual exams, you already have the materials to have, and thus do not have to worry about making them.


Hi, thanks for the response, for the first question what i meant what do u focus your revision on , for example past topics? Or upcoming topics? Or topics that you struggle to remember ect.Yeah, i had just started my first 4 lessons today , i take 4 a levels and i want to get all A*s in them , and from what ive heard , you would have to sacrifice your time outside of school and during your frees, and this baffled me as i had no clue what those people focus their revision on exactly , as teachers should go through every topic and homework isnt exactly what i would call revision. So overall im just confused on what to revise on when it comes to a levels as in my head its either topics that you struggle to memorise or just topics that your teacher hasnt covered.Im just wondering what else could their possibly be.
Original post by CaptainDuckie
When I did my A-levels I personally just used it to read around topics. For example: if I learnt mitosis, I would spend a good amount of time just reading around it - to gain a foundational understanding. Certain topics you cover at A-level expect you to have some sort of foundational understanding in order to understand more of it, I hope this makes sense.

Similarly, I read ahead on certain topics and any questions I had, I would write a long list of questions to ask my teacher during the lesson. Again, I found that this gathered conceptual understanding.




thanks for the tag. :smile:

what does reading around your topic / subject mean exactly? Does it mean that you went beyond the specification to gain an understanding?
Original post by cllarence10
what does reading around your topic / subject mean exactly? Does it mean that you went beyond the specification to gain an understanding?




It means that I spent huge amounts of time solidifying my understanding. I would research the topic in-depth, not necessarily beyond the specification though. Sometimes reading things from different perspectives help you understand it better. The text book IMO assumes you to have so much knowledge about the topic already - I’m kind of slow so I need everything simplified, and clearly explained lol.

Most of the time, I would spend time revisiting content at GCSE level just to get that lightbulb moment. Hope this makes sense.
(edited 1 year ago)

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