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In Britain we use the word MUM ! ! ! watch

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    (Original post by cheeseinthedraw)
    Seriously is anyone else getting annoyed by the americanised abuse of our lovely english language by some posters on this forum.

    It is MUM and not MOM as so many of you foul mouthed fools are saying.

    Why do you do it??????
    please explain !
    Apparently American English is the closest approximation of what modern English would have sounded like today if not for Southern English approximations becoming dominant over the more Northern accent variations according to our linguistics professor. So an American may be justified in saying that it is in fact the English who do not know how to speak their own language....
    *Boy, I hope I don't start a flame war over this! :p: *
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    I don't like mom for some reason. I'll use mutti, mutter or mum. I'm not allowed to call her mummy (not that I would anyway) cos she always replies, "The mummy walks!"
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    (Original post by Apollinariya)
    Yeah, I meant West Midlands.
    I thought so. in the east it's mum and the west it's mom. good to know
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    Ma, good old Scottish slang :p:
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    Liverpool its ma or mam.
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    How did mother get shortened to mum?

    I dun get it. I still use it, but I don't get it.

    LANGUAGE HISTORY PLEASE.
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    (Original post by Lisakid)
    Liverpool its ma or mam.

    And in Ireland! It's clearly better than mum or mom.
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    (Original post by alibertine)
    Ma, good old Scottish slang :p:
    Clearly the goodest old Scottish slang would be "maw". :p:
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    Have we nothing better to worry about at the moment, such as the so called "financial crisis??"
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    My theory is that when some British people first went to America, they caught a cold and their voices went a bit nasal. People gradually adapted to using the nasal voice fr all words, including messing up a load of spellings such as "mom", "color", "flavor", etc.
    Actually if I'm not mistaken color, flavor, organize, realize etc are the original Latin-derived spellings. There's nothing American about them.

    They were mostly spelled that way in Britain until the Norman conquest in 1066 when they were changed to -our/-ise to encourage the French proncounation.

    The Americans decided to switch back to the original Latin-based spellings since nobody was using the French pronunciation anymore and they were considered easier to use. But the British kept most of them, but did change a few of them - back in the 1600’s people in the UK used to spell horror as horrour, error as errour, emperor as emperour.

    I didn't know that until recently :woo:

    So basically:

    Color = Original Latin-derived spelling
    Colour = French influenced respelling
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    (Original post by Lord Foul)
    I call her Ami Ji.
    Hah.
    Mother/Mum.
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    (Original post by Apollinariya)
    If you're from the Midlands, 'mom' is very common. Nothing wrong with it.

    :yep: I'm from midlands and I say mom and mam because my moms irish!
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    I say Mam.
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    The most people that learn English as a second language, we are way more exposed to American English, so we also adopt all these. I don't think it's irreasonable.
    But probably native britons should speak their way.
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    I say "mom". I'm a brummy.
    Fiance calls his mother "mum". He's half brummy.
    My mom calls her mom "mom".

    Is it really that important? They're both contractions of "mother", so strictly speaking they're both wrong.
 
 
 
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