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    (Original post by snoogy)
    Is it possible to cash in the credits you've gained so far so that you walk out with some sort of evidence of your degree so far? I know that some uni's will reward you certificates of HE or HNDs etc if you have a certain number of credits.

    And I agree, Computer Science would drain me completely but if you're good at it, do they allow you to take dual honours so you can mix something fun with something you're good at? If I didn't have psych (a subject I've never done before) next to computer science (one that I could probably do in my sleep) I'd have dropped out by now. It's so clinical and clean and unthinking. And the essay writing style is just void of all personality.
    I really do wish I did a joint honours to begin with - that was a mistake on my behalf. As I could really see myself doing one with business or management to give it balance. For sure straight CS is not for me, it's for those that get a boner out of writing lines of code.

    Incidently the only thing that is keeping me from 'quiting' straight CS is soley the fact that it is a 'challenge', one that would just boost my confidence if I can get the degree with a good mark despite despising it.
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    You are so close, just finish it and then get into something more interesting, if you so choose.
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    I was just telling someone the other day, that you'd need a good interest in computing to be able to do a degree on it. As much as I love computing, I still find bits of it boring - can't imagine what it would be like for someone who doesn't have the interest.
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    (Original post by Kalashnikov)
    I was just telling someone the other day, that you'd need a good interest in computing to be able to do a degree on it. As much as I love computing, I still find bits of it boring - can't imagine what it would be like for someone who doesn't have the interest.
    Very painful, one could compare it to a slow death.
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    Where did you do your year in industry? You must clearly be very good at programming if you managed to secure a years placement
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    Where did you do your year in industry? You must clearly be very good at programming if you managed to secure a years placement
    Freelance.
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    History is a bad subject with no employment prospects, try to stick at ur degree because its relevant and you will reap the rewards later
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    (Original post by IrunNewYork)
    History is a bad subject with no employment prospects, try to stick at ur degree because its relevant and you will reap the rewards later
    Nonsense perhaps?
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    Could you tell me which university you're at? Sorry if I missed you mentioning it earlier...

    I would say that if you truly do despise it you should go for a switch. I used to feel that I should go for a degree that would have good prospects even if I didn't enjoy it; I've now realised that I'd have little chance for success without a subject I'm really interested in. If you're the same sticking with it probably wouldn't be a good idea...
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    Yeah, can I ask which university?
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    The reason for this, is that my degree (computing science) is absolutely boring. Programming, and although I am 'able' at it does not stimulate me at all and frankly I cannot see myself programming afterwards for 20 odd years upon graduation.
    Uh, computing science shouldn't just be programming - its a multi discipline subject covering maths, physics, electronics and countless other areas (neurology or music for example, depending on your specialisms)

    I'd repeat what other have said, try and pick up an extra-curricular activity. I spent a lot of time during my degree in DramaSoc. It shouldnt interfere with your studies too much, I was on the committee for a year and had heavy involvments for the other two years and managed to get a First.

    After you graduate, programming isn't the only route you can take either. I'm a technical consultant for a supplier of commodity/energy trading software, for example.
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    I know its not the same position you are in, but I was in a kind of similar situation with my A-levels a couple of weeks ago. Upon starting 4 A2's it was really stressing me out, I couldn't keep on top of the work and just felt ****. But I kept going, got things organised and now its getting a bit better

    The point is, you might just be going through a rough patch, in which case, battle on and get through it. If, however, you decide to drop out, just think it through before you do it.

    EDIT: Overall, I would say stick with it, but we can't make the decision for you because we don't know exactly how you are thinking.
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    Only half of my degree is in computing but I can symphathise. A lot of the work can be very tedious rather than engaging and it's easy to get bored, especially if you were never that interested in the first place. Sadly though, I gather this rough patch is the norm for many degree level programmes.

    Like others have said, maybe you should try exploring other outside activities before switching? You might find the creative release is enough to keep you going.
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    As a final year CS student - I can honestly say the subject makes me want to swear at things sometimes. Sometimes I do wish I'd been able to do a joint honours (CS + Maths), but the way things went for me I didn't really have much of a choice but to do the single honours course.
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    Can you take option courses from other departments?
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    (Original post by Apocalypte)
    As a final year CS student - I can honestly say the subject makes me want to swear at things sometimes. Sometimes I do wish I'd been able to do a joint honours (CS + Maths), but the way things went for me I didn't really have much of a choice but to do the single honours course.
    I wish I did a joint honours with management. (if I rechose it)
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Deep down inside yeah I do feel strongly for changing degrees. Even prior to this bad patch I never did strongly enjoy programming, all that motivated me was the job prospects afterwards. Which was further reinforced by family pressures and so on.
    Hi,

    I know this thread is flippin' 8 years old :P

    But I'm lurkin on TSR for some advise.

    I am still quite in the same situation as you were.
    I wanted to study engineering mostly for the prospects rather than out of interest, but I am scared that I would fail miserably as you know engineering is very tough. And my dad always pressured me to study chemical engineering for example, almost all of my family have this mindset, that unless you study something very tough and difficult, you're wasting your time at university?

    So now I want to study psychology, which is what I'm interested in, but I'm still scared to study it as it's often seen as a "soft" subject or "useless"?

    Also how have you gotten on since your CS degree?
    Did you switch courses, leave etc.?
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    (Original post by nsolma1)
    Hi,

    I know this thread is flippin' 8 years old :P

    But I'm lurkin on TSR for some advise.

    I am still quite in the same situation as you were.
    I wanted to study engineering mostly for the prospects rather than out of interest, but I am scared that I would fail miserably as you know engineering is very tough. And my dad always pressured me to study chemical engineering for example, almost all of my family have this mindset, that unless you study something very tough and difficult, you're wasting your time at university?

    So now I want to study psychology, which is what I'm interested in, but I'm still scared to study it as it's often seen as a "soft" subject or "useless"?

    Also how have you gotten on since your CS degree?
    Did you switch courses, leave etc.?

    Lol.

    God this thread is old!

    I ended up sticking at it, I got a 2.1 in the end. It was hard, but I am so GLAD that I didn't change courses.

    Since graduation I have been working as a developer, and I have found a lot of my CS knowledge has been handy. Definitely more into programming now, then back then. How life changes.

    If you want to study psychology, I would suggest studying it at a top university as it is a saturated field.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Lol.

    God this thread is old!

    I ended up sticking at it, I got a 2.1 in the end. It was hard, but I am so GLAD that I didn't change courses.

    Since graduation I have been working as a developer, and I have found a lot of my CS knowledge has been handy. Definitely more into programming now, then back then. How life changes.

    If you want to study psychology, I would suggest studying it at a top university as it is a saturated field.
    Wow...

    I almost thought you were about to change course? lool
    But why were you stuck in programming actually? I thought CS was quite a broad field?

    Damn, I don't think I have a chance at going to a top university.
    I have messed up my A levels twice, and I can only do a foundation year. But keep in mind, I failed not necessarily because I couldn't do it, but more because for such a long time I was struggling with anxiety and depression. Which constantly distracted me from studying at that time.

    Honestly psychology is like the only degree I am interested in at the moment.
    And from what I have read on TSR.
    Undergrad psychology won't be enough to work in psychology, so you will need postgrad. Otherwise, since psychology involves some statistics, biology and more. Most people say you could then "transfer" into other careers if you want to leave a psychology career behind.

    Problem is that I have already taken a gap year, and I would dread to take another one. I have about a month to apply to UCAS, but I haven't looked properly into the course modules, lectures yet? Do you think it's too late to do that now?

    Other than that, I have tried the idea of studying other degrees like accounting, chemistry, law etc. But I feel that I would mainly study them for the career prospects rather than out of interest? Which I feel could be dangerous to do, as I could then drop out or something.

    Also I have read quite a few times that most grad schemes/jobs don't need a specific degree, but just a 2.1? Do you know anywhere on TSR where I could find more info about this? I have tried the search bar, but I don't find that many results, I will try again soon.

    Also would you advise me to take a joint-honours to be on the safe side?

    Damn, this thread is ooooooooooooolllllddd.

    So how's life after university anyway? Seems like you're happier now.
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    (Original post by nsolma1)
    Wow...

    I almost thought you were about to change course? lool
    But why were you stuck in programming actually? I thought CS was quite a broad field?
    It is hard at degree level. A CS degree is hard. When you work in industry things become easier, as you are encouraged to use frameworks and 3rd party APIs. When I did CS, the theory was hard, and I had to code everything from scratch.

    Damn, I don't think I have a chance at going to a top university.
    I have messed up my A levels twice, and I can only do a foundation year. But keep in mind, I failed not necessarily because I couldn't do it, but more because for such a long time I was struggling with anxiety and depression. Which constantly distracted me from studying at that time.

    Honestly psychology is like the only degree I am interested in at the moment.
    And from what I have read on TSR.
    Undergrad psychology won't be enough to work in psychology, so you will need postgrad. Otherwise, since psychology involves some statistics, biology and more. Most people say you could then "transfer" into other careers if you want to leave a psychology career behind.

    Problem is that I have already taken a gap year, and I would dread to take another one. I have about a month to apply to UCAS, but I haven't looked properly into the course modules, lectures yet? Do you think it's too late to do that now?

    Other than that, I have tried the idea of studying other degrees like accounting, chemistry, law etc. But I feel that I would mainly study them for the career prospects rather than out of interest? Which I feel could be dangerous to do, as I could then drop out or something.

    Also I have read quite a few times that most grad schemes/jobs don't need a specific degree, but just a 2.1? Do you know anywhere on TSR where I could find more info about this? I have tried the search bar, but I don't find that many results, I will try again soon.

    Also would you advise me to take a joint-honours to be on the safe side?

    Damn, this thread is ooooooooooooolllllddd.

    So how's life after university anyway? Seems like you're happier now.
    These days, you need good UCAS points and a 2.1 minimum for any good grad scheme. If I were you, I wouldn't cut corners.

    If I were you I would stay away from doing a joint honours, just specialize in one subject then do a masters. I might do psychology as a masters at some point.

    Life is much better, when you work on interesting projects and earn money, it makes learning CS worthwhile.
 
 
 
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