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Psychology degree

I am thinking of doing psychology at university but have not taken a level biology. Even though most unis don’t say that you need it, would a level biology increase my chances of getting onto the course, especially in competitive unis like Oxford? Or would just psychology a level be fine
Original post by Isabella.193
I am thinking of doing psychology at university but have not taken a level biology. Even though most unis don’t say that you need it, would a level biology increase my chances of getting onto the course, especially in competitive unis like Oxford? Or would just psychology a level be fine


hmmm oxford uni is hard to get into but its not impossible if u have the grades and ur application and reference is outstanding u should be guud to go. and i feel like bio would've helped but if its not theres its fine as u said most unis dont require it and the others a level or betecs ur doing are at a gud grade u should not be worried <3333
(Original post by Isabella.193)I am thinking of doing psychology at university but have not taken a level biology. Even though most unis don’t say that you need it, would a level biology increase my chances of getting onto the course, especially in competitive unis like Oxford? Or would just psychology a level be fine

I wouldn't assume so - most psychology courses at university recommend one or two science subjects (including psych) without requiring a particular science. The most important thing you can do to increase your chance of getting onto a psychology course is to get good grades and have an excellent personal statement, and if you're applying to Oxbridge, then you'll need to have excellent admissions tests results, which, if you're applying to Oxford this year, the deadline is the 30th September.
Original post by Isabella.193
I am thinking of doing psychology at university but have not taken a level biology.


Marketing legislation means that Unis have to be entirely upfront and honest about required or preferred subjects for each degree.
There are no 'hidden secrets' or 'information that only special people know'.

So - unless they say specifically that 'second science preferred' or 'must include Biology etc, then that is what they mean.

Bristol - A*AA including A on one of Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Further Mathematics; Geography; Mathematics; Physics; Psychology; and Statistics.
UCL - A*AA to include at least one, preferably two subjects from: Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics and Psychology.
York - AAA including at least one of Biology, Chemistry, Further Maths, Maths, Physics, and Psychology
Manchester - AAA/AAB including one or more of: Psychology, Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Statistics, Mathematics, Further Maths, Geography, Geology, Environmental Science, Applied Science, Computer Science.
Sheffield - AAB including a science subject
Sussex - AAB/ABB - no specified subjects
Original post by the fennian
(Original post by Isabella.193)I am thinking of doing psychology at university but have not taken a level biology. Even though most unis don’t say that you need it, would a level biology increase my chances of getting onto the course, especially in competitive unis like Oxford? Or would just psychology a level be fine

I wouldn't assume so - most psychology courses at university recommend one or two science subjects (including psych) without requiring a particular science. The most important thing you can do to increase your chance of getting onto a psychology course is to get good grades and have an excellent personal statement, and if you're applying to Oxbridge, then you'll need to have excellent admissions tests results, which, if you're applying to Oxford this year, the deadline is the 30th September.


Okay thank you. Do you think taking a level biology would make me more preferable among other people who haven’t taken it?
Original post by Isabella.193
Okay thank you. Do you think taking a level biology would make me more preferable among other people who haven’t taken it?


It depends. As a subject - I don't think it's going to give you much of an advantage with admissions compared to people who haven't taken it (though biology will most likely be a useful subject for studying the biological side of psychology - one of my friends studied biology, and when I was studying biopsychology I found it very useful to talk to her about the biological processes to gain a better understanding)

The most important part about applying to university is having subjects that fit the entry requirements, and having good grades in those subjects.
For example, since you mentioned Oxford:
Experimental Psychology A Level (recommended) requirements: One or more science subjects (including Psychology) or Maths
(Link to the page: https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/course-listing/psychology-experimental)
For this, the top candidates would have at least one, if not two subjects out of: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Maths. If you already have one/two of those, then unless you particularly enjoy biology, then you don't have to take it.

High grades are also a very important factor - for psychology, the highest grade requirement is A*AA (Oxford, UCL, etc) and for Russel universities you'll find that they range in about A*AA to AAB.
Studying biology in itself won't make you more or less preferable among other candidates - e.g. a student who has A* physics A psychology A geography will be more preferable when compared to a student who has A biology, A psychology, A geography, simply because of the higher grade.

Another important factor, that's arguably more important than the specific science that you're studying is the admissions test. If you're studying psychology, you'll only have to do admissions tests for Oxbridge. The admissions test are an empirical way of showing to the university your reasoning skills, whereas if you're applying to university and you haven't taken biology yet, you'll be applying with your predicted grades.

tl;dr: as long as you're studying at least one/two sciences(/maths/psychology), it doesn't matter what science you study and biology will give you no particular advantage over physics or chemistry.
Original post by the fennian
It depends. As a subject - I don't think it's going to give you much of an advantage with admissions compared to people who haven't taken it (though biology will most likely be a useful subject for studying the biological side of psychology - one of my friends studied biology, and when I was studying biopsychology I found it very useful to talk to her about the biological processes to gain a better understanding)

The most important part about applying to university is having subjects that fit the entry requirements, and having good grades in those subjects.
For example, since you mentioned Oxford:
Experimental Psychology A Level (recommended) requirements: One or more science subjects (including Psychology) or Maths
(Link to the page: https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/course-listing/psychology-experimental)
For this, the top candidates would have at least one, if not two subjects out of: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Maths. If you already have one/two of those, then unless you particularly enjoy biology, then you don't have to take it.

High grades are also a very important factor - for psychology, the highest grade requirement is A*AA (Oxford, UCL, etc) and for Russel universities you'll find that they range in about A*AA to AAB.
Studying biology in itself won't make you more or less preferable among other candidates - e.g. a student who has A* physics A psychology A geography will be more preferable when compared to a student who has A biology, A psychology, A geography, simply because of the higher grade.

Another important factor, that's arguably more important than the specific science that you're studying is the admissions test. If you're studying psychology, you'll only have to do admissions tests for Oxbridge. The admissions test are an empirical way of showing to the university your reasoning skills, whereas if you're applying to university and you haven't taken biology yet, you'll be applying with your predicted grades.

tl;dr: as long as you're studying at least one/two sciences(/maths/psychology), it doesn't matter what science you study and biology will give you no particular advantage over physics or chemistry.


So if I got A*AA in history, psychology and business it would be better than someone who got AAB in Chemistry, physics and maths?
Original post by Isabella.193
So if I got A*AA in history, psychology and business it would be better than someone who got AAB in Chemistry, physics and maths?

You would have to check the course requirements to make sure that the specific course didn't require two science subjects, but yes - at A*AA as long as you fulfil the A level subject requirements, as far as I am aware that would definitely be better than AAB in science subjects.

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