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Applying to masters with joint degrees?

Msc in Mathematical Finance requires Mathematics. Msc in Economics requires Economics.

Does a joint degree cover these areas sufficiently? For example Maths and Economics. What about degrees with minors, e.g Maths with Economics applying to a Msc in Economics?

Thanks :smile:
yes on the first question, generally, no on the second, generally
Which university? Most mathematical finance degrees don't specifically need a maths degree (physics - for example - is generally acceptable).
Reply 3
Generally yes. However you should always check each institution's/programme's specific requirements. For example the UCL Economics MSc page mentions that:

A minimum of an upper second-class Bachelor's degree in Economics with a significant quantitative component from a UK university, or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard. Applicants with a qualification of an equivalent standard in another quantitative discipline, such as statistics, mathematics, or physics, may also be considered
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by ajj2000
Which university? Most mathematical finance degrees don't specifically need a maths degree (physics - for example - is generally acceptable).

You are correct, perhaps my example was poor.

But this:

https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-mathematical-and-theoretical-physics

I don’t imagine economics counts as a ‘related’ dicipline, but would a joint Maths and Economics degree be sufficient?
Original post by pinkdoughnut11
You are correct, perhaps my example was poor.

But this:

https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-mathematical-and-theoretical-physics

I don’t imagine economics counts as a ‘related’ dicipline, but would a joint Maths and Economics degree be sufficient?


That is a theoretical physics course - not a mathematical finance course.

My guess is that for most finance course joint maths / economics would be ok - and would be fine and possibly preferred for masters degrees in economics.
Original post by ajj2000
That is a theoretical physics course - not a mathematical finance course.

My guess is that for most finance course joint maths / economics would be ok - and would be fine and possibly preferred for masters degrees in economics.

Ok thanks. :smile:

I was just providing an example that requires maths as an undergrad degree - Would this Maths/Eco be accepted on this course despite Eco not being a related dicipline? (Theoretical Physics)

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