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Uni suggestions

Suggest me some good universities where a GCSE B in maths is not required (I’ve got a C☹️)
My subjects:Business Economics Psychology
I want to do Business Management in UK
Reply 1
There are loads to choose from but it's your A level results that are the most important: -
https://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings/business-and-management-studies

Some may overlook the GCSE result if you have strong A levels
Original post by AsadUsman
Suggest me some good universities where a GCSE B in maths is not required (I’ve got a C☹️)
My subjects:Business Economics Psychology
I want to do Business Management in UK


Wouldn't it be easier to just resit your GCSE maths? If you score high grades in your A Level, you would be significantly (and unnecessarily) held back because of a minor grade difference in one subject.

Note: I am not a fan of business managment degrees, so I am biased.

Business management degrees don't ask for specific subjects at A Levels; only that you get good grades. You could have easily done 3 random A Levels (e.g. religiious studies, chemistry, and French) and still get onto the course.

Whilst university league tables came under criticism recently, they are still a useful approximate gauge of the quality of the business schools in the country.
See the following as examples:
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate/degrees/management-science-bsc
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/subjects/management/management-ma/#entry-requirements
https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/foundation/business/
https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/i475/business-management-ba#section3
https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/business-management-bsc-hons-n102/#course-entry
http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/business/businessman/#entry-requirements
https://www.york.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/ba-business-management/#entry
https://www.uea.ac.uk/course/undergraduate/ba-business-management#course-entry-requirements
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by AsadUsman
Suggest me some good universities where a GCSE B in maths is not required (I’ve got a C☹️)
My subjects:Business Economics Psychology
I want to do Business Management in UK

You need to check the entry requirements. Just go into ucas course search and check each university's entrance requirement. It might be a few hours of your time but if you want to go to university doing proper research shouldnt be beyond you.
Reply 4
Original post by MindMax2000
Wouldn't it be easier to just resit your GCSE maths? If you score high grades in your A Level, you would be significantly (and unnecessarily) held back because of a minor grade difference in one subject.

Note: I am not a fan of business managment degrees, so I am biased.

Business management degrees don't ask for specific subjects at A Levels; only that you get good grades. You could have easily done 3 random A Levels (e.g. religiious studies, chemistry, and French) and still get onto the course.

Whilst university league tables came under criticism recently, they are still a useful approximate gauge of the quality of the business schools in the country.
See the following as examples:
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate/degrees/management-science-bsc
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/subjects/management/management-ma/#entry-requirements
https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/foundation/business/
https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/i475/business-management-ba#section3
https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/business-management-bsc-hons-n102/#course-entry
http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/courses/business/businessman/#entry-requirements
https://www.york.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/ba-business-management/#entry
https://www.uea.ac.uk/course/undergraduate/ba-business-management#course-entry-requirements


Can i ask for more info on why you don't necessarily like business/business management degrees? They're always in the top ten most popular degrees every year and you can go into finance,accountancy, business etc with them. Just curious on your opinion :smile:
Original post by Mossu
Can i ask for more info on why you don't necessarily like business/business management degrees? They're always in the top ten most popular degrees every year and you can go into finance,accountancy, business etc with them. Just curious on your opinion :smile:


A list of reasons:

The application and demand from employers for management degrees are next to none. You might know more about management than your employer for example, but they won't hire you because you know more and they definitely won't let you apply your knowledge.

They're not as highly regarded as other more qunatitative degrees e.g. engineering, mathematics, physics

When compared with graduates of other disciplines for business roles, you're equally ranked if not less despite being significantly more relevant

You might be seen as a threat to your line manager if you are in fact able to prove yourself i.e. you will likely have a very short tenure

A lot of the business knowledge is theory, and a lot of it won't either be applicable or appreciated in the workplace

Employers would want you to train and work according to how they want you to work, irrespective of what you know about business. In fact, knowing nothing about business can be more useful to them.

You are not required to have degrees for business related roles. In fact you could sometimes go into these roles without any qualification. For example, you don't need any qualifications to go into marketing or HR. You can go into accounting with A Levels or nothing at all.

Business degrees are generally more expensive than degrees of other disciplines (postgrad), even though they are never really requested in the workplace

Business degrees generally won't offer you exemptions for professional business related qualifications that generally are requested and are appreciated e.g. professional accounting, marketing, HR, finance related qualifications

A lot of the content in business related degrees is a repeat of A Level Business Studies

The only real use of a business related degree is if you want to go into business or start a business yourself, but then you could easily learn what you need outside of academia (with more relevant and more skills based knowledge) e.g. A Level Business Studies, CIMA's BA Certificate, some sort of business course

You cannot do a management related postgrad if you already did an undergrad, but you need a business related degree at postgrad level in order to do a PhD in it

A lot of the material in business related degrees are out of date in terms of what works in the workplace, but business schools still teach it and refuse to update their material e.g. you wouldn't use the same marketing tactics even from 2 years ago, yet business schools teach the same marketing tactics used 20-60 years ago

A lot of the material is opinionated and subjective (much can be proved wrong), yet it's treated like it's godsend e.g. HRM theories, business strategy

There are quantitative modules where you do learn certain skills that would prove useful in the workplace, but these aren't as commonly taught

Some of the key skills to running businesses are never included in the degrees e.g. copywriting, selling skills, negotiation, persuasion

Where business skills are taught, the way they are taught is redundant e.g. read a book then you are presented an opportunity in groups to practice what was preached only once, after that write a very academic report about it that bears little to no resemblance to how it's done in the workplace

The academic tone used in report would only work against you in the business world - in the business world, they use a completely different tone and language to academics

They teach you essentially no useful skills that might help with work i.e. having management skills can be applied to anything, but you would still need a trade in order to start a business; you can't have a business that offers 'management skills' as a service. It would be nice if it was coupled with a trade such as engineering, programming, digital art, languages (for translation services), etc.

Business degrees contain material that are too broad in my opinion for any practical use in any niche or industry

Business degrees generally don't consider cross cultural practices (which happens to be very important) and are incredibly Amercian centric. If you apply the same business practices in a UK or Irish company, you will have your rear end handed to you. If you apply the same practices in a team where you are dealing with team members from a multi-ethnic and multinational background, you can have a lot of conflict (not that you should discriminate or bias certain practices over others based on nationality or ethnicity). If you then have an egotistic boss or one who expects you to get exactly what he/she is saying with little to no context/read his or her mind, expect a very difficult time and a very quick exit at your expense.

You are very likely required to unlearn a lot of the material you did learn in business degrees when you do go into business roles.



There are probably more, but I think the above is more than enough to illustrate things on my end. However, if you're adament in doing a business degree, don't let me put you off.
Reply 6
Original post by MindMax2000
A list of reasons:

The application and demand from employers for management degrees are next to none. You might know more about management than your employer for example, but they won't hire you because you know more and they definitely won't let you apply your knowledge.

They're not as highly regarded as other more qunatitative degrees e.g. engineering, mathematics, physics

When compared with graduates of other disciplines for business roles, you're equally ranked if not less despite being significantly more relevant

You might be seen as a threat to your line manager if you are in fact able to prove yourself i.e. you will likely have a very short tenure

A lot of the business knowledge is theory, and a lot of it won't either be applicable or appreciated in the workplace

Employers would want you to train and work according to how they want you to work, irrespective of what you know about business. In fact, knowing nothing about business can be more useful to them.

You are not required to have degrees for business related roles. In fact you could sometimes go into these roles without any qualification. For example, you don't need any qualifications to go into marketing or HR. You can go into accounting with A Levels or nothing at all.

Business degrees are generally more expensive than degrees of other disciplines (postgrad), even though they are never really requested in the workplace

Business degrees generally won't offer you exemptions for professional business related qualifications that generally are requested and are appreciated e.g. professional accounting, marketing, HR, finance related qualifications

A lot of the content in business related degrees is a repeat of A Level Business Studies

The only real use of a business related degree is if you want to go into business or start a business yourself, but then you could easily learn what you need outside of academia (with more relevant and more skills based knowledge) e.g. A Level Business Studies, CIMA's BA Certificate, some sort of business course

You cannot do a management related postgrad if you already did an undergrad, but you need a business related degree at postgrad level in order to do a PhD in it

A lot of the material in business related degrees are out of date in terms of what works in the workplace, but business schools still teach it and refuse to update their material e.g. you wouldn't use the same marketing tactics even from 2 years ago, yet business schools teach the same marketing tactics used 20-60 years ago

A lot of the material is opinionated and subjective (much can be proved wrong), yet it's treated like it's godsend e.g. HRM theories, business strategy

There are quantitative modules where you do learn certain skills that would prove useful in the workplace, but these aren't as commonly taught

Some of the key skills to running businesses are never included in the degrees e.g. copywriting, selling skills, negotiation, persuasion

Where business skills are taught, the way they are taught is redundant e.g. read a book then you are presented an opportunity in groups to practice what was preached only once, after that write a very academic report about it that bears little to no resemblance to how it's done in the workplace

The academic tone used in report would only work against you in the business world - in the business world, they use a completely different tone and language to academics

They teach you essentially no useful skills that might help with work i.e. having management skills can be applied to anything, but you would still need a trade in order to start a business; you can't have a business that offers 'management skills' as a service. It would be nice if it was coupled with a trade such as engineering, programming, digital art, languages (for translation services), etc.

Business degrees contain material that are too broad in my opinion for any practical use in any niche or industry

Business degrees generally don't consider cross cultural practices (which happens to be very important) and are incredibly Amercian centric. If you apply the same business practices in a UK or Irish company, you will have your rear end handed to you. If you apply the same practices in a team where you are dealing with team members from a multi-ethnic and multinational background, you can have a lot of conflict (not that you should discriminate or bias certain practices over others based on nationality or ethnicity). If you then have an egotistic boss or one who expects you to get exactly what he/she is saying with little to no context/read his or her mind, expect a very difficult time and a very quick exit at your expense.

You are very likely required to unlearn a lot of the material you did learn in business degrees when you do go into business roles.



There are probably more, but I think the above is more than enough to illustrate things on my end. However, if you're adament in doing a business degree, don't let me put you off.

wow i see there are a lot of drawbacks. I was mainly wondering it tbh because I was hopeful a business management degree would be helpful in securing a job role within another professional job profile - as the ones you mentioned (accountancy)- as some unis don't have accountancy undergrad degrees you can go into directly (st andrews, ucl, oxbridge etc.) Thanks for the info. I also did some extra research and yeah, its not seen as a hugely great degree. Do you reckon it would be more beneficial to apply somewhere else in the similar direction as my top priority right now is st Andrews, and the similar courses they have I could apply for would be economics or economics and management. Would one of those two be better applying for?
Original post by Mossu
wow i see there are a lot of drawbacks. I was mainly wondering it tbh because I was hopeful a business management degree would be helpful in securing a job role within another professional job profile - as the ones you mentioned (accountancy)- as some unis don't have accountancy undergrad degrees you can go into directly (st andrews, ucl, oxbridge etc.) Thanks for the info. I also did some extra research and yeah, its not seen as a hugely great degree. Do you reckon it would be more beneficial to apply somewhere else in the similar direction as my top priority right now is st Andrews, and the similar courses they have I could apply for would be economics or economics and management. Would one of those two be better applying for?

Compared to other degrees, I don't think there are significantly more drawbacks. The list is long because I'm detailed oriented.

Do you reckon it would be more beneficial to apply somewhere else in the similar direction as my top priority right now is st Andrews, and the similar courses they have I could apply for would be economics or economics and management. Would one of those two be better applying for?
Sorry, I don't quite get the question. Do you mean whether it's better to apply for a different degree that is in a similar disicipline?
A degree from a top university would be well regarded irrespective of the subject. However, if you're specifically going into a job where a degree is required or is considered beneficial, then the degree needs to be relevant. For example, it makes little sense to do an economics degree (irrespective of which university it's from) in order to go into nursing.
I don't think economics degrees are particularly more highly regarded than management degrees if you're going into a business role. However, it's beneficial to do an economics degree if you want to be open to economist roles. For business related roles, you can apply with any degree.
If you're going for finance related roles, you would need the relevant professional finance qualification specific for the role, and most of these don't have entry requirements.
If you want to become an economist, then a straight economics degree is usually seen as better than an economics and management degree. If you're going into a business related role, then I don't think the specific subject would matter very much.
Reply 8
mmmm... disagree with much of the business management degree knocking...

Frankly, the MAJORITY of degrees fall into the same boat. Unless you are doing a degree that is DIRECTLY relevant to a specific job i.e say a degree in veterinary because you want to become a vet the majority of courses are NOT going to provide you with the skills required in the commercial world. Even in this example you would still need further training in the Real-world environment.

I could use the arguments against to a whole range of degree subjects. A good friend of mine got a First in Maths at Durham, struggled like hell to get on a grad program, ended up selling life assurance for a few years, bounced around a number of senior roles in the telecoms industry and at age 40 is now a Maths teacher at a small school.

All the degree proves is that a) you are most likely trainable and b) have a respectable level of intelligence to be trained. The degree is simply a currency to trade as i see it to help you get onto a career path to get started.

If you can do some work experience alongside the business degree or use it to get onto a specific graduate training program, then it's done its job in my opinion. If later, you want to start your own business you at least have all the base foundation principles to build from.

As always, it's what you do AFTER the degree that counts. I wouldn't be put off doing a business degree unless you know beforehand exactly what career path you are interested in, in which case a degree specifically relevant to that career path along with some work experience alongside in that career would probably serve you better. Good luck

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