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    I have a question with a set of reactions and have to show how each can react with a standard electrophile - E+.

    I'm having a problem with two of the compounds:

    CH2=CH-CH2-MgBr - would the magnesium bromine just polarise the double bond, so the double bond breaks and the carbon can form a bond to the electrophile? also forming a carboncation.

    Et-O-Na - i'm not sure would happen here. Would the oxygen just pulls electrons towards it as its more electronegative and be able to react, and replace the Na?

    Many thanks for any help!.
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    (Original post by hidden088)
    I have a question with a set of reactions and have to show how each can react with a standard electrophile - E+.

    I'm having a problem with two of the compounds:

    CH2=CH-CH2-MgBr - would the magnesium bromine just polarise the double bond, so the double bond breaks and the carbon can form a bond to the electrophile? also forming a carboncation.

    Et-O-Na - i'm not sure would happen here. Would the oxygen just pulls electrons towards it as its more electronegative and be able to react, and replace the Na?

    Many thanks for any help!.
    Think of Grignards like R- and MgBr+ so that R- (the nucleophile) attacks an electrophile

    This acts as RO- and Na+ so the RO- acts as a nucleophile

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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    Think of Grignards like R- and MgBr+ so that R- (the nucleophile) attacks an electrophile

    This acts as RO- and Na+ so the RO- acts as a nucleophile

    Ah ok! so the sodium would just be replaced with the new electrophile, would the double bond on the MgBr compound break, so that the carbon can form a new bond? But wouldn't that leave one of the carbons as a carboncation? Or does another carbon react with the electrophile.
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    (Original post by hidden088)
    Ah ok! so the sodium would just be replaced with the new electrophile, would the double bond on the MgBr compound break, so that the carbon can form a new bond? But wouldn't that leave one of the carbons as a carboncation? Or does another carbon react with the electrophile.
    the double bond doesn't break it stays as CH2=CH-CH2-

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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    the double bond doesn't break it stays as CH2=CH-CH2-

    Oooo, sorry yeah, didn't occur to me that the MgBr would just be replaced
 
 
 
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