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LNAT universities guidance - help !

My predicted grades are A*A*A and I intend to study law at university. The dilemma I'm facing is this, I want to attend a top 10 institution but I have a fear of poor performance within the LNAT. This fear is not unfounded as, according to online LNAT practice tests, I'm just scraping average marks.

At this point, I'm even considering doing a History degree and then a GDL to heighten my chances of offers from top institutions...

If I applied to strictly non-LNAT universities i.e Leeds, York, Nottingham, Warwick etc, are my graduate prospects still strong enough to render me a competitive applicant to London law firms?

Alternatively, do you suggest that I should take the risk and apply to 3 non-LNAT, 2 LNAT requiring universities?

Cheers
Original post by OliverTSR
My predicted grades are A*A*A and I intend to study law at university. The dilemma I'm facing is this, I want to attend a top 10 institution but I have a fear of poor performance within the LNAT. This fear is not unfounded as, according to online LNAT practice tests, I'm just scraping average marks.

At this point, I'm even considering doing a History degree and then a GDL to heighten my chances of offers from top institutions...

If I applied to strictly non-LNAT universities i.e Leeds, York, Nottingham, Warwick etc, are my graduate prospects still strong enough to render me a competitive applicant to London law firms?

Alternatively, do you suggest that I should take the risk and apply to 3 non-LNAT, 2 LNAT requiring universities?

Cheers

Im personally deciding to go through the GDL route, at the end of the day you still study law (when doing the GDL) and i get into a better uni which essentially means i get a better job after uni.You could put 3 non lnat law unis and 2 non law courses meaning you can put the unis that would have required an Lnat score down for the non law courses

There’s a lot of mixed reviews with LNAT some people say you can revise it and some just say some people naturally get it and others don’t.That’s why a lot of people see themselves in a similar state as you trying to avoid it
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 2
Original post by Elijah2004
Im personally deciding to go through the GDL route, at the end of the day you still study law (when doing the GDL) and i get into a better uni which essentially means i get a better job after uni.You could put 3 non lnat law unis and 2 non law courses meaning you can put the unis that would have required an Lnat score down for the non law courses

There’s a lot of mixed reviews with LNAT some people say you can revise it and some just say some people naturally get it and others don’t.That’s why a lot of people see themselves in a similar state as you trying to avoid it


Yeah, it's a tough decision. There are only a couple of months until I need to decide.
Another fear is that if I struggle with the LNAT, maybe I just don't have the aptitude required to thrive in that career...

Just did an Arbitio free test and scored 22 which I'm happy with considering how hard it's meant to be, but who knows what it will be like in the real thing.

Out of curiosity, what degree are you applying for?
Original post by OliverTSR
Yeah, it's a tough decision. There are only a couple of months until I need to decide.
Another fear is that if I struggle with the LNAT, maybe I just don't have the aptitude required to thrive in that career...

Just did an Arbitio free test and scored 22 which I'm happy with considering how hard it's meant to be, but who knows what it will be like in the real thing.

Out of curiosity, what degree are you applying for?


Don’t be put off. I’ve visited a few Uni open days (most not LNAT) and good, reputable courses. One recently dropped the LNAT. I asked all about this, and most of the admissions tutors said their reasoning for not doing it or dropping it, was simply they don’t feel the LNAT really gives an objective view of whether that person will be good at studying ACADEMIC law. They said they found no correlation in success at Uni to how students did in their LNAT back in the day. I thought that was quite interesting.
Original post by OliverTSR
Yeah, it's a tough decision. There are only a couple of months until I need to decide.
Another fear is that if I struggle with the LNAT, maybe I just don't have the aptitude required to thrive in that career...

Just did an Arbitio free test and scored 22 which I'm happy with considering how hard it's meant to be, but who knows what it will be like in the real thing.

Out of curiosity, what degree are you applying for?


Im looking at applying for history and politics.Yeah like you said who knows what the real thing will be like, that’s the main issue for me the lack of preparedness i feel even if i try revise for it. Its also important to remember the SQE 1 prep course it technically extra year of education(around 6 months) and this means extra costs, but if you have a firm at that point most of them cover the costs.I’ve seen some people say the SQE prep course was the hardest thing they’ve done as they are essentially learning what some people learn in 3 years through an accelerated course.These are just things to weigh in when deciding.
Im in the same boat. I’ve been using arbitio to practice the LNAT, and the most ive got in the MCQ has been 20 so far, which i know isnt good enough for any of the uni’s im applying for that require the LNAT. It is frustrating, and I feel like there’s only so much prep that you can do :/
Original post by Squiggles1238
Im in the same boat. I’ve been using arbitio to practice the LNAT, and the most ive got in the MCQ has been 20 so far, which i know isnt good enough for any of the uni’s im applying for that require the LNAT. It is frustrating, and I feel like there’s only so much prep that you can do :/

You'll be fine. Someone I know who's being scoring similar to you just attempted an official practice test and scored 27, so I think that you're underestimating your ability.
Original post by toxicgamage56
You'll be fine. Someone I know who's being scoring similar to you just attempted an official practice test and scored 27, so I think that you're underestimating your ability.


I really hope that to be the case. It's rather strange as my college is holding LNAT sessions, and we practiced a couple of passages with sets of questions (these came from an LNAT book), and everyone found them extremely easy. I appreciate that arbitio is designed to be harder than the real thing, but I really doubt it is that much harder.

My worst has been 13, so getting 19 in the one I practiced today has showed me that not all hope is lost, but there is still so much improvement to make, and my LNAT is in two weeks today!!!
Reply 8
Original post by toxicgamage56
You'll be fine. Someone I know who's being scoring similar to you just attempted an official practice test and scored 27, so I think that you're underestimating your ability.

I have been going through The Ultimate LNAT Collection: 3 Books In One, 600 Practice by Rohan Agarwal and William Antony and have found this to be pretty easy, much easier than the official LNAT website practice tests.

I will struggle to pay for Arbitio but I would take the hit if it is definitely worth it. Is the Arbitio free practice test easier than the other practice papers on the site? I still haven't booked my LNAT but I'm thinking of doing it in December so if I were to buy it now I'd have a couple of months of practice.

What's your opinion on this?

Also, how do I prepare best for the essay section? Not the essay writing skills but the essay topics and content. I rarely read the news, therefore, I don't have a strong understanding of a wide range of contemporary contentious issues. Looking at some of the examples on the LNAT website, I could think of little evidence to support the varying arguments within an essay. Any tips?

Cheers
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by OliverTSR
I have been going through The Ultimate LNAT Collection: 3 Books In One, 600 Practice by Rohan Agarwal and William Antony and have found this to be pretty easy, much easier than the official LNAT website practice tests.

I will struggle to pay for Arbitio but I would take the hit if it is definitely worth it. Is the Arbitio free practice test easier than the other practice papers on the site? I still haven't booked my LNAT but I'm thinking of doing it in December so if I were to buy it now I'd have a couple of months of practice.

What's your opinion on this?

Also, how do I prepare best for the essay section? Not the essay writing skills but the essay topics and content. I rarely read the news, therefore, I don't have a strong understanding of a wide range of contemporary contentious issues. Looking at some of the examples on the LNAT website, I could think of little evidence to support the varying arguments within an essay. Any tips?

Cheers

The free Arbitio test is the same difficulty as the rest of their tests. If you were to buy the course, you can use my discount code (SUBSCRIBE_85269) to get 10% off. However, Arbitio is by no means necessary, and the LNAT is very much about natural aptitude after all so don't feel pressured to buy into it if your finances will be affected (I'm sure your school might be able to help out in the form of a bursary if you really need). 22 is pretty good for Arbitio. I've done 3 tests, and my highest score is 25, so I feel like that will put you in good standing for the actual LNAT.
For the essay section, I use the following structure: introduction including your interpretation of the essay prompt and your stance, 2 points for your argument, one counter-argument and a rebuttal, then a conclusion. You obviously can't be expected to have specialist knowledge on all essay topics, but try to incorporate some rough statistics (tbh, you could fib a little if it's realistic as they won't check) and try to use what knowledge you do have. Generally, you are expected to write 500-600 words and a maximum of 750 words which is easily doable within the 45 minutes you get, so I wouldn't be too afraid of the essay (especially if the universities you're applying to don't check the essay).
Reply 10
Original post by toxicgamage56
The free Arbitio test is the same difficulty as the rest of their tests. If you were to buy the course, you can use my discount code (SUBSCRIBE_85269) to get 10% off. However, Arbitio is by no means necessary, and the LNAT is very much about natural aptitude after all so don't feel pressured to buy into it if your finances will be affected (I'm sure your school might be able to help out in the form of a bursary if you really need). 22 is pretty good for Arbitio. I've done 3 tests, and my highest score is 25, so I feel like that will put you in good standing for the actual LNAT.
For the essay section, I use the following structure: introduction including your interpretation of the essay prompt and your stance, 2 points for your argument, one counter-argument and a rebuttal, then a conclusion. You obviously can't be expected to have specialist knowledge on all essay topics, but try to incorporate some rough statistics (tbh, you could fib a little if it's realistic as they won't check) and try to use what knowledge you do have. Generally, you are expected to write 500-600 words and a maximum of 750 words which is easily doable within the 45 minutes you get, so I wouldn't be too afraid of the essay (especially if the universities you're applying to don't check the essay).


I'll definitely consider using that code, cheers. The essay appears less daunting now, I'll also take a look at the universities that do not consider it. Out of curiosity where are you considering/have applied to? It's such a tricky decision between applying to the best universities, LNAT requiring, or applying to a couple and the remainder Russell group courses that don't require it. It's frustrating how it hinges on this test, but it is understandable.
Reply 11
Original post by BarryScott2022
Don’t be put off. I’ve visited a few Uni open days (most not LNAT) and good, reputable courses. One recently dropped the LNAT. I asked all about this, and most of the admissions tutors said their reasoning for not doing it or dropping it, was simply they don’t feel the LNAT really gives an objective view of whether that person will be good at studying ACADEMIC law. They said they found no correlation in success at Uni to how students did in their LNAT back in the day. I thought that was quite interesting.


It is rather interesting, it's just a shame that it serves as a barrier for students trying to attend top universities. I suppose it's to separate the good students from the great students. It's funny though as I've read of many Cambridge law students who did not score well on the LNAT yet still succeeded on that course.
Original post by OliverTSR
It is rather interesting, it's just a shame that it serves as a barrier for students trying to attend top universities. I suppose it's to separate the good students from the great students. It's funny though as I've read of many Cambridge law students who did not score well on the LNAT yet still succeeded on that course.

I don’t think it can be Cambridge students as they’re only starting using the LNAT this year. They used to do their own Cambridge Law Test so perhaps they meant that.
That was another point one of the Directors of one of the courses made re LNAT. He said it can be costly & they don’t want it to be a barrier to applying. Fair point.

Good luck anyway.
Reply 13
Original post by BarryScott2022
I don’t think it can be Cambridge students as they’re only starting using the LNAT this year. They used to do their own Cambridge Law Test so perhaps they meant that.
That was another point one of the Directors of one of the courses made re LNAT. He said it can be costly & they don’t want it to be a barrier to applying. Fair point.

Good luck anyway.

Sorry if that was poorly worded. I meant to say that applicants to Cambridge - who still sat the LNAT and received their scores - succeeded there (received 1st, passed the Cambridge admissions test like you mentioned etc) despite not scoring particularly highly in the LNAT. So is it truly an accurate measure of ability for success within Law? I agree with what the admissions tutors you spoke to said about the matter.

Same to you!
Original post by OliverTSR
Sorry if that was poorly worded. I meant to say that applicants to Cambridge - who still sat the LNAT and received their scores - succeeded there (received 1st, passed the Cambridge admissions test like you mentioned etc) despite not scoring particularly highly in the LNAT. So is it truly an accurate measure of ability for success within Law? I agree with what the admissions tutors you spoke to said about the matter.

Same to you!

I understand now & see your point. Ultimately though some universities must rate it to continue to use it, so I’m sure they’d have a different view of it.
Original post by OliverTSR
I'll definitely consider using that code, cheers. The essay appears less daunting now, I'll also take a look at the universities that do not consider it. Out of curiosity where are you considering/have applied to? It's such a tricky decision between applying to the best universities, LNAT requiring, or applying to a couple and the remainder Russell group courses that don't require it. It's frustrating how it hinges on this test, but it is understandable.

I'm applying to UCL, KCL, Durham, QMUL, and one other which ought to be a safety since the aforementioned 4 have an entry requirement of A*AA. I'm not sure about Durham since it's quite far from London. But yeah, it's quite annoying to have my grades and PS sorted, but having everything hinge on this one "aptitude" test. However, I have heard from some friends that have just done it that it's much easier than Arbitio and that a lot of answers "pop out".
If anyone is searching for Arbitio promo code here's one

SUBSCRIBE_32721 ! You're welcome.

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