The Student Room Group

is pure law a bad idea??

I'm currently in my first year of A-levels and I'm starting to think about what I want to do. I'm quite set on law, but many of my fellow law-pursuers are advising me against a pure law degree. I've looked at joint honours, but not many well respected unis do them and I'm so clueless about conversion courses. Also I don't really know what unis to consider outside of Oxbridge to secure a training contract. Pls help 🙏🙏
Original post by izzy_v22
I'm currently in my first year of A-levels and I'm starting to think about what I want to do. I'm quite set on law, but many of my fellow law-pursuers are advising me against a pure law degree. I've looked at joint honours, but not many well respected unis do them and I'm so clueless about conversion courses. Also I don't really know what unis to consider outside of Oxbridge to secure a training contract. Pls help 🙏🙏


If you really want to do Law that badly then you should follow that. However, it's a very tough field and I think you really need to put your whole mindset into the profession to truly succeed at it. What other subjects do you have an interest in?
Original post by izzy_v22
I'm currently in my first year of A-levels and I'm starting to think about what I want to do. I'm quite set on law, but many of my fellow law-pursuers are advising me against a pure law degree. I've looked at joint honours, but not many well respected unis do them and I'm so clueless about conversion courses. Also I don't really know what unis to consider outside of Oxbridge to secure a training contract. Pls help 🙏🙏

Hi there

I also study law and would say this- if you're truly interested in pursuing and studying law, you should. It's easy to be discouraged by others' opinions but as long as you devote yourself to it and manage your time well, it is possible to ace a law degree. However, if there's another subject that intrigues you but you still wanna be a solicitor, do that degree instead. If you're clueless about conversion courses, do some research into it. Read some articles on google and watch youtube videos. You don't need to think about it too much for now because if you do end up getting a TC, your firm would most probably help you through the process.

Durham is one of the top 7 law schools so you can consider it as well. You can start by looking at league tables- look at at least 4-5 and draw out the common ones from all of them. Then research them more in terms of whether they meet your expectations of what uni should be like. Here are some considerations to think about: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/diagrams/considerations-when-choosing-a-university. But always remember that firms don't really look at which uni you studied at when offering you a TC- they care more about your actual grades + your ability to be a good trainee which is showcased through your application answers and assessment centre/interviews/aptitude tests.

-Himieka
Reply 3
Original post by JDINCINERATOR
If you really want to do Law that badly then you should follow that. However, it's a very tough field and I think you really need to put your whole mindset into the profession to truly succeed at it. What other subjects do you have an interest in?


I also have interest in Psychology and English Literature, which are two of my Alevel subjects, however I think my prospects might be even worse in these areas :frown:
Reply 4
Original post by Durham Students
Hi there

I also study law and would say this- if you're truly interested in pursuing and studying law, you should. It's easy to be discouraged by others' opinions but as long as you devote yourself to it and manage your time well, it is possible to ace a law degree. However, if there's another subject that intrigues you but you still wanna be a solicitor, do that degree instead. If you're clueless about conversion courses, do some research into it. Read some articles on google and watch youtube videos. You don't need to think about it too much for now because if you do end up getting a TC, your firm would most probably help you through the process.

Durham is one of the top 7 law schools so you can consider it as well. You can start by looking at league tables- look at at least 4-5 and draw out the common ones from all of them. Then research them more in terms of whether they meet your expectations of what uni should be like. Here are some considerations to think about: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/g/diagrams/considerations-when-choosing-a-university. But always remember that firms don't really look at which uni you studied at when offering you a TC- they care more about your actual grades + your ability to be a good trainee which is showcased through your application answers and assessment centre/interviews/aptitude tests.

-Himieka

As a law student, do you have any advice for me what I could do to be proactive for uni applications i.e. what extra curriculars, external programmes should I get involved in?? I'm currently a debate club member, a school librarian and I just received confirmation that I'll be on a Model Law Commission program with BVL over the next three months.
If not no worries.. It's just not many around me in life seem to know what the hell I'm talking about when it comes to law
Original post by izzy_v22
I also have interest in Psychology and English Literature, which are two of my Alevel subjects, however I think my prospects might be even worse in these areas :frown:


Psychology is a very useful subject and so is English Lit. I think they will be less demanding and more rewarding. My advice is keep your expectations in check and don't let pressure force you into doing anything.
Original post by izzy_v22
As a law student, do you have any advice for me what I could do to be proactive for uni applications i.e. what extra curriculars, external programmes should I get involved in?? I'm currently a debate club member, a school librarian and I just received confirmation that I'll be on a Model Law Commission program with BVL over the next three months.
If not no worries.. It's just not many around me in life seem to know what the hell I'm talking about when it comes to law


You're already doing a lot and from my experience, it's more than enough to demonstrate an interest in law on your UCAS application. Please don't feel pressured, you can engage in whatever extra-curricular you're interested in- be it sports, music, drama or anything else. Be proactive but don't burn yourself out. If you want to be a solicitor, some firms have programmes for Year 10-13 students that you can apply for or maybe do some mooting competitions. You can find more info about these programmes using the following links:

http://theworkladder.com/opportunities-students-year-12-13/
https://www.legable.co.uk/legal-work-experience-england-wales
https://www.lawcareers.net/Explore/Features/17082021-Mooting-opportunities-for-students

You absolutely don't need any legal work experience to get an offer but if you do wanna get involved in something, the above links can be a useful resource. You can also complete some free virtual experiences on Forage or Springpod :smile:

-Himieka
Reply 7
Original post by Durham Students
You're already doing a lot and from my experience, it's more than enough to demonstrate an interest in law on your UCAS application. Please don't feel pressured, you can engage in whatever extra-curricular you're interested in- be it sports, music, drama or anything else. Be proactive but don't burn yourself out. If you want to be a solicitor, some firms have programmes for Year 10-13 students that you can apply for or maybe do some mooting competitions. You can find more info about these programmes using the following links:

http://theworkladder.com/opportunities-students-year-12-13/
https://www.legable.co.uk/legal-work-experience-england-wales
https://www.lawcareers.net/Explore/Features/17082021-Mooting-opportunities-for-students

You absolutely don't need any legal work experience to get an offer but if you do wanna get involved in something, the above links can be a useful resource. You can also complete some free virtual experiences on Forage or Springpod :smile:

-Himieka


Thanks a lot! It's reassuring to know I'm doing enough.
Reply 8
Original post by JDINCINERATOR
Psychology is a very useful subject and so is English Lit. I think they will be less demanding and more rewarding. My advice is keep your expectations in check and don't let pressure force you into doing anything.


would you be able to give me more information on what opportunities an English lit degree would offer?
Original post by izzy_v22
would you be able to give me more information on what opportunities an English lit degree would offer?


I don't know if there are any jobs that specifically require an English Literature degree. However, a degree in English Lit can help you be a journalist, freelance writer, teacher, museum curator, copywriter and author.

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