The Student Room Group

Physiotherapy course with children

Heya
Has anyone done a physiotherapy course as an adult learner with children to care for? How did you juggle kids and uni?

I'm wanting to do the course but I'm just afraid that I'm not going to have time with my kids.

Thank you in advance 😊
I cannot possibly comment personally, however I know someone who did a Physiotherapy course part-time in order to help juggle kids and university, it would take 6 years instead of 3 but could be an option... or maybe do a PT degree apprenticeship, I am not sure if that would help with having more time with your children but it takes 4 years I believe and you learn on the job.
Reply 2
Original post by palaeolivic
I cannot possibly comment personally, however I know someone who did a Physiotherapy course part-time in order to help juggle kids and university, it would take 6 years instead of 3 but could be an option... or maybe do a PT degree apprenticeship, I am not sure if that would help with having more time with your children but it takes 4 years I believe and you learn on the job.


Heya thank you for your response. Unfortunately there isn't anywhere near by that does the apprenticeship.

Thanks again
Claire
Original post by Claire 24!
Heya
Has anyone done a physiotherapy course as an adult learner with children to care for? How did you juggle kids and uni?

I'm wanting to do the course but I'm just afraid that I'm not going to have time with my kids.

Thank you in advance 😊


Hi Clare,

So I'm currently doing my access course, and have 2 under 6.
University looming for next year, I have had to make decisions based upon unis closer to me due to commute. It's not going to be easy but, Luckily my partner works part time and we currently fit around the kids. Lucky to have support networks also.

With being an adult learner, people are always aware of other commitments, and as long as your upfront from the start it's easier.
Reply 4
Original post by lukesmith1987
Hi Clare,

So I'm currently doing my access course, and have 2 under 6.
University looming for next year, I have had to make decisions based upon unis closer to me due to commute. It's not going to be easy but, Luckily my partner works part time and we currently fit around the kids. Lucky to have support networks also.

With being an adult learner, people are always aware of other commitments, and as long as your upfront from the start it's easier.

Heya
Thank you for your advice, I hope the course is going well. I'm hoping to get on to an access course in September this year, I was wondering if you recommend any books that might be worth getting before the course? I'm slightly dislexic and unfortunately take longer to lean things, so I'm hoping to learn as much as possible before the course.

Many thanks
Claire
Original post by Claire 24!
Heya
Thank you for your advice, I hope the course is going well. I'm hoping to get on to an access course in September this year, I was wondering if you recommend any books that might be worth getting before the course? I'm slightly dislexic and unfortunately take longer to lean things, so I'm hoping to learn as much as possible before the course.

Many thanks
Claire


Hi Claire,
so I would say what access course are you doing this will allow me to maybe suggest what books to need.
also most colleges would and can help with any extra needs so dyslexia they can aid for sure once you announce it straight away to them.

luke
Reply 6
Original post by lukesmith1987
Hi Claire,
so I would say what access course are you doing this will allow me to maybe suggest what books to need.
also most colleges would and can help with any extra needs so dyslexia they can aid for sure once you announce it straight away to them.

luke

Thank you Luke for your response, it'll be an access to health course.

I know they'll be able to accommodate for me but it will help reduce my stress levels if I know a bit before the course.

Thanks again
Claire 😊
You doing access to Heath professions or access to science.?
Original post by Claire 24!
Thank you Luke for your response, it'll be an access to health course.

I know they'll be able to accommodate for me but it will help reduce my stress levels if I know a bit before the course.

Thanks again
Claire 😊

AHP courses like physiotherapy and the preliminary Access course are very commonly taken by both mature students generally, and students with parents, and so the academic/tutorial academic staff are used to dealing with the common issues which arise with these cohorts. However, it's important to be aware of just how 'full on' an Access course, and then a physiotherapy degree is. A common issue is that the student tries to fit the course around their other commitments, such as childcare, whereas the course needs to come front and centre if you are to succeed. That's not to say that a student parent cannot manage to balance childcare, work and being a f/t student - but it requires much planning, foresight, Plans B, C and D for various calamities/eventualities and preferably good support at home.

You will have several placements during your physiotherapy degree, and these are non-negotiable. Although most universities attempt to give 'priority placement' to students with children, placing them in hospitals or locations relatively close to their homes, this is not guaranteed, and you may end up having to attend a placement many miles away - again, this is something to check with each HE institution you're thinking of attending. As for the Access course, there are several modes of study, both full-time, part-time and online (not recommended), so it's worth thinking about which is going to fit in best with your current commitments - but of course, the goal is to do the degree, so it's worth planning ahead to see whether that is going to be achievable before starting the Access course. Universities will be as flexible and accommodating as they can, but in the end there is a limit to what can be accommodated, and students who begin to regularly miss scheduled teaching, placement/placement activities and other directed learning due to 'childcare/family' commitments soon become problematic. The best way of mitigating this is to plan, plan and plan more before embarking on the degree by getting concrete details of requirements for attendance, placement and coursework expectations early. Timetables are not released (for HE, anyway) until a few weeks until the start of the academic year, but most unis will be happy to show you the current year's timetable so you can get an idea of the number/timing of directed learning.
Reply 9
Original post by Reality Check
AHP courses like physiotherapy and the preliminary Access course are very commonly taken by both mature students generally, and students with parents, and so the academic/tutorial academic staff are used to dealing with the common issues which arise with these cohorts. However, it's important to be aware of just how 'full on' an Access course, and then a physiotherapy degree is. A common issue is that the student tries to fit the course around their other commitments, such as childcare, whereas the course needs to come front and centre if you are to succeed. That's not to say that a student parent cannot manage to balance childcare, work and being a f/t student - but it requires much planning, foresight, Plans B, C and D for various calamities/eventualities and preferably good support at home.

You will have several placements during your physiotherapy degree, and these are non-negotiable. Although most universities attempt to give 'priority placement' to students with children, placing them in hospitals or locations relatively close to their homes, this is not guaranteed, and you may end up having to attend a placement many miles away - again, this is something to check with each HE institution you're thinking of attending. As for the Access course, there are several modes of study, both full-time, part-time and online (not recommended), so it's worth thinking about which is going to fit in best with your current commitments - but of course, the goal is to do the degree, so it's worth planning ahead to see whether that is going to be achievable before starting the Access course. Universities will be as flexible and accommodating as they can, but in the end there is a limit to what can be accommodated, and students who begin to regularly miss scheduled teaching, placement/placement activities and other directed learning due to 'childcare/family' commitments soon become problematic. The best way of mitigating this is to plan, plan and plan more before embarking on the degree by getting concrete details of requirements for attendance, placement and coursework expectations early. Timetables are not released (for HE, anyway) until a few weeks until the start of the academic year, but most unis will be happy to show you the current year's timetable so you can get an idea of the number/timing of directed learning.

Hi
Thank you so much for your advice, I think you are definitely right. Preparation and planning along with research is key. I'm very keen but I'm also very courteous not to get into something I can't finish. I will definitely get in touch with the university in regards to there time table. It definitely makes sense to do this, I'm planning on going into the college for a taster day in June to hopefully have a bit more of an insight to what it will be like.

Thanks again
Claire

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