The Student Room Group

Why did UK leave the EU?

I have to answer that question for Citizenship. The internet does not provide a clear answer (or I'm just too dumb for that :tongue:) Please, help
We wanted to make the country more isolated and harder to trade with.
Original post by StriderHort
We wanted to make the country more isolated and harder to trade with.


Thank you very much
Reply 3
Original post by HotaruWalkthr
Thank you very much

That is the cynical answer. The answer is multifaceted. Some wanted to be able to set limits on immigration as opposed to the freedom of movement being in the EU required us to implement. Others wanted to regain some sort of mythical ideology of sovereignty which allows our government to make its own decision unimpeded of the EU. Others just wanted to stick one up to the government of the day which was giving out a very pro-EU message.

The reality has been that we are receiving just as many illegal immigrants as before
Our government is still bound by international agreements and deals it has made including with the EU
We are no freer of our nearest much larger neighbours than we were before. The only difference is we no longer have influence in the EU's decision making process.
It has been an unmitigated disaster.
Original post by hotpud
That is the cynical answer. The answer is multifaceted. Some wanted to be able to set limits on immigration as opposed to the freedom of movement being in the EU required us to implement. Others wanted to regain some sort of mythical ideology of sovereignty which allows our government to make its own decision unimpeded of the EU. Others just wanted to stick one up to the government of the day which was giving out a very pro-EU message.

The reality has been that we are receiving just as many illegal immigrants as before
Our government is still bound by international agreements and deals it has made including with the EU
We are no freer of our nearest much larger neighbours than we were before. The only difference is we no longer have influence in the EU's decision making process.
It has been an unmitigated disaster.


Glib as I was, I'd hope we could agree I could have been far more negative, I was at least 40% on Brexo message there.

If someone asked me for sensible reasons we left, well.. I'd slap them.
Because people of a certain generation wished to take us back to a time before EU regulations dictated the curvature of our bananas.

Alas, it was generation who wore such rose-tinted spectacles that they have forgotten we were known as the sick man of Europe.
Original post by StriderHort
We wanted to make the country more isolated and harder to trade with.


So we can hear the wailing and gnashing of teeth from the likes of the above.
Also because the UK made lots of stupid laws and pinned the blame on the EU.
Original post by HotaruWalkthr
I have to answer that question for Citizenship. The internet does not provide a clear answer (or I'm just too dumb for that :tongue:) Please, help


An answer from an actual Brexiteer (i.e. me).

I voted Brexit for 3.5 reasons (I was previously a europhile before I actually considered things in 2015)...

0.5) I actually bothered to read the Treasury and IMF reports rather than just the media headlines and the mean scenarios basically stated that the hit to annual GDP would be about 0.4%. I.e. average growth between 2018-2030 was forecast to be 1.8% rather than 2.2%.

This basically took away my largest concern since I took the view that a small hit to GDP was not something that would substantially impact my life and the potential existed for meaningful economic reform to overcome this.

1) Sovereignty - As somebody that had always had a strong nationalist leaning despite my prior europhile views I looked upon the number of directives coming from Brussels with dismay and found the idea of a foreign parliament or council directing our laws to be offensive. Notably there are conflicts such as the ECJ being able to overrule the Supreme Court, this is frankly offensive.

Identity was likely a factor here too. While I previously supported EU membership and federalism because of the potential power, I do not consider myself European and one only need look at the Franco-German betrayal and hesitation over Ukraine to see why we should remain sovereign.

2) Disagreements with various laws - I do not support VAT, I support things which would be tantamount to state aid, I do not support the common agricultural policy, I think an island nation allowing foreign states access to it's fish stock to be frankly insane and many others. Sufficed to say, my economic views do not wash with the level playing field.

3) The Refugee Crisis - Although the crisis itself is not a big factor in itself it embodies everything wrong with the current organisational structure of the EU. In 2015 we began to see a flood of third world migrants enter Europe and rather than defend the wishes of most European people in multiple states in multiple polls, we saw Merkel (previously a hero during the Greek austerity crisis) invite literally millions of third world migrants into the country.

Worse though, the European council led by Merkel and co then attempted to force states like Hungary and Poland which had explicitly expressed their wish that there be no migration allowed to accept a quota which would have forced more than 100,000 third worlders onto them.

What this told us is two things. The first is that as per the Lisbon Treaty referendums which were simply ignored and the states made to vote again and give the right answer, the European elite don't give a rat's about the opinions of their populous. The second is that they are not at all willing to defend the cultural makeup of Europe, inviting third world Muslims in their millions. No sane conservative who values the supremecy of market democracy and the liberties we have should support that.

..

In short, I am British and have more in common with North Americans than I do the Spanish and I find the idea that we should be dependent on their direction and are not capable of self rule to be offensive. Couple that with minor disagreements over refugee and economic policies and we see the reason for my change in stance. The attitude of the EU over things like NI only hardened my stance.
Original post by Rakas21
An answer from an actual Brexiteer (i.e. me).

I voted Brexit for 3.5 reasons (I was previously a europhile before I actually considered things in 2015)...

0.5) I actually bothered to read the Treasury and IMF reports rather than just the media headlines and the mean scenarios basically stated that the hit to annual GDP would be about 0.4%. I.e. average growth between 2018-2030 was forecast to be 1.8% rather than 2.2%.

This basically took away my largest concern since I took the view that a small hit to GDP was not something that would substantially impact my life and the potential existed for meaningful economic reform to overcome this.

1) Sovereignty - As somebody that had always had a strong nationalist leaning despite my prior europhile views I looked upon the number of directives coming from Brussels with dismay and found the idea of a foreign parliament or council directing our laws to be offensive. Notably there are conflicts such as the ECJ being able to overrule the Supreme Court, this is frankly offensive.

Identity was likely a factor here too. While I previously supported EU membership and federalism because of the potential power, I do not consider myself European and one only need look at the Franco-German betrayal and hesitation over Ukraine to see why we should remain sovereign.

2) Disagreements with various laws - I do not support VAT, I support things which would be tantamount to state aid, I do not support the common agricultural policy, I think an island nation allowing foreign states access to it's fish stock to be frankly insane and many others. Sufficed to say, my economic views do not wash with the level playing field.

3) The Refugee Crisis - Although the crisis itself is not a big factor in itself it embodies everything wrong with the current organisational structure of the EU. In 2015 we began to see a flood of third world migrants enter Europe and rather than defend the wishes of most European people in multiple states in multiple polls, we saw Merkel (previously a hero during the Greek austerity crisis) invite literally millions of third world migrants into the country.

Worse though, the European council led by Merkel and co then attempted to force states like Hungary and Poland which had explicitly expressed their wish that there be no migration allowed to accept a quota which would have forced more than 100,000 third worlders onto them.

What this told us is two things. The first is that as per the Lisbon Treaty referendums which were simply ignored and the states made to vote again and give the right answer, the European elite don't give a rat's about the opinions of their populous. The second is that they are not at all willing to defend the cultural makeup of Europe. No sane conservative who values the supremecy of market democracy and the liberties we have should support that.

In short, I am British and have more in common with North Americans than I do the Spanish and I find the idea that we should be dependent on their direction and are not capable of self rule to be offensive. Couple that with minor disagreements over refugee and economic policies and we see the reason for my change in stance. The attitude of the EU over things like NI only hardened my stance.

PRSOM
This looks like a study help question rather than an open political one I've moved it over there. :smile:

Quick Reply

Latest