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    To those who have completed PhDs and what is the process of acquiring the title after completion?
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    Don't know, but I hope I get one in a few years... it'll do wonders for my insurance quote...
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    I don't know, I want to do a PhD after I've done my degree, whether i'll use the title or not, I don't know. Everyone I've spoke to about it though have all said : ooh! You'll be a 'Dr' then!. Soo.. yep :p: it's only a title at the end of the day though.
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    Am a surgeon but I use my first name with patients/nurses/other doctors. Dr only gets used when someone's being obstructive (usually some kinda manager/receptionist).

    Overusing Dr is a little pretentious IMO... Have gone back to Mr officially now anyway :P
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    Only professionally. I'm halfway through my PhD but my boyfriend has his, and is only ever referred to as 'Dr' by students (though most call him by his first name) and other academics. If someone in a bank or whatever addressed him as 'Mr' he certainly wouldn't correct them. It's pretentious. It would show arrogance and insecurity to behave like that.
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    Only professionally. I'm halfway through my PhD but my boyfriend has his, and is only ever referred to as 'Dr' by students (though most call him by his first name) and other academics. If someone in a bank or whatever addressed him as 'Mr' he certainly wouldn't correct them. It's pretentious. It would show arrogance and insecurity to behave like that.
    Well its an achievement one should be proud so why not always correct people?
    Can you choose to opt out of the title, is it conferred automatically upon completion?
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    One of my friends is a lord but he just uses mr. I presume the case would be the same with drs.
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    (Original post by IrunNewYork)
    Well its an achievement one should be proud so why not always correct people?
    Can you choose to opt out of the title, is it conferred automatically upon completion?
    If you didn't want the 'title', you wouldn't do a PhD. You are a doctor whether you like it or not. Whether you choose as an individual to utilise it in such a way as to rub everyone's noses in the fact, is another matter. Gordon Brown, for example, has a doctorate but doesn't use the title of Doctor. Similarly Angela Merkel.
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    (Original post by IrunNewYork)
    Well its an achievement one should be proud so why not always correct people?
    Can you choose to opt out of the title, is it conferred automatically upon completion?
    I don't know if you can opt out, but I presume not - after all, it's really up to the individual how much they use it outside of a formal capacity, and if they opted out they wouldn't be able to use it professionally, which might prove problematic.

    As for the other thing, there's being proud of your achievements on a personal level, and there's braying about them openly in order to boost your ego or pull rank. Now I know informing someone who calls you 'Mr' that they should be saying 'Dr' is hardly braying, but at the same time it's hardly necessary to mention it in most circumstances. I suppose it depends on whether or not you care that the woman in the phone shop knows that you're clever and over-educated
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    (Original post by oriel historian)
    If you didn't want the 'title', you wouldn't do a PhD. You are a doctor whether you like it or not. Whether you choose as an individual to utilise it in such a way as to rub everyone's noses in the fact, is another matter. Gordon Brown, for example, has a doctorate but doesn't use the title of Doctor. Similarly Angela Merkel.
    But on letters, driving licence etc, does that mean you have no choice but to be referred to as dr formally?
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    (Original post by IrunNewYork)
    But on letters, driving licence etc, does that mean you have no choice but to be referred to as dr formally?
    No - those things have boxes. If you want to be known as Mr so n so you have the individual right to choose. The matter is somewhat different at work. But the same is the case for a medical doctor.
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    OP, why do you care anyway? You're years away from doing one.
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    (Original post by the_alba)
    OP, why do you care anyway? You're years away from doing one.
    Perhaps he's wondering whether it'll be worth the effort.
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    My uncle only ever writes Dr if he is complaining about something. Normally he just uses Mr.

    He has a postgrad. in Geology though so he's not a medical doctor.
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    Most "medical doctors" in the UK don't actually have PhDs, though, do they?:confused:
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    I don't have a PhD but most of the lecturers at my university don't use the Dr. prefix outside of the nameplate on their office doors.

    My personal opinion, as someone hoping to one day in a million years down the line to do a PhD herself, I don't particular want to use the Dr. prefix. I appreciate people who would want to use it but I am hoping to become a composer and unless I marry, I am likely to be confused by a welsh author who is a Dr. at my University with the same name as me.
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    I remember that FRIENDS episode where someone, I think it was Russ's mom pointing out to someone that he was a Dr, only for one of the flatmates to turn around and state "he's not a REAL Dr though"

    This is exactly how I would feel about using it, waiting for someone to point out that I wasn't a 'proper' Dr!
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Most "medical doctors" in the UK don't actually have PhDs, though, do they?:confused:
    No but my point was that people have the right to choose. It's a professional qualification which endows a title; if you use it, it's your prerogative to do so.
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    (Original post by AllergicToFairydust)
    I don't have a PhD but most of the lecturers at my university don't use the Dr. prefix outside of the nameplate on their office doors.

    My personal opinion, as someone hoping to one day in a million years down the line to do a PhD herself, I don't particular want to use the Dr. prefix. I appreciate people who would want to use it but I am hoping to become a composer and unless I marry, I am likely to be confused by a welsh author who is a Dr. at my University with the same name as me.
    Don't worry, there are bezillions of them. Just use your middle initial as a marker of individuality
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    (Original post by oriel historian)
    Don't worry, there are bezillions of them. Just use your middle initial as a marker of individuality
    Oh yeah an M is really going to make a difference. :rolleyes: As far as I am aware there is only 1 person in the UK with your name and 312 with mine.
 
 
 
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