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Medicine vs Pharmacy

Hi, i am currently in year 12 and am undecided upon my career options. I have always wanted to do medicine as i am a social person. Recently, i have came across pharmacy, and i have realised that the job may be better suited to my talents as i am better at chemistry that biology. Also, i have heard that pharmacy has a better work-life balance and would be looking to have kids somewhere in my twenties. Of course these things cannot be planned, but it reflects the fact that a good work life balance is important. I have yet to receive my actual predicted grades, but my gcse’s are 9999999887. My eights were in physics and psychology and my seven in a L2 further maths. Please let me know whether you think pharmacy or medicine may be a better course of action for me. I am planning to explore both by getting work experience!
Thank you.
Original post by CarysEmma
Hi, i am currently in year 12 and am undecided upon my career options. I have always wanted to do medicine as i am a social person. Recently, i have came across pharmacy, and i have realised that the job may be better suited to my talents as i am better at chemistry that biology. Also, i have heard that pharmacy has a better work-life balance and would be looking to have kids somewhere in my twenties. Of course these things cannot be planned, but it reflects the fact that a good work life balance is important. I have yet to receive my actual predicted grades, but my gcse’s are 9999999887. My eights were in physics and psychology and my seven in a L2 further maths. Please let me know whether you think pharmacy or medicine may be a better course of action for me. I am planning to explore both by getting work experience!
Thank you.


Medicine includes a crazy amount of chem too(we have pharmacology lectures as well as chem just being everywhere in every other lecture)

I think you should read around the jobs to see what each entails because although both in healthcare they are vastly different
(edited 1 year ago)
you have such good gcse grades how did you revise 😭

I think pharmacy would be better for you as like you said your better at chemistry and you know how to talk to people too.
Original post by doughnutsareslay
you have such good gcse grades how did you revise 😭

I think pharmacy would be better for you as like you said your better at chemistry and you know how to talk to people too.

Do drs not talk to people?
Reply 4
Original post by doughnutsareslay
you have such good gcse grades how did you revise 😭

I think pharmacy would be better for you as like you said your better at chemistry and you know how to talk to people too.

To be honest, I did different things for different subjects. Around January I started to revise and make loads of flashcards for everything. Most of GCSE is just memorisation, which is both annoying and amazing. My english literature has always been around the 6/7 mark so i asked my teacher for past questions for her to mark. I did around 6 essays altogether, which sounds like alot but over time, it actually isnt that much. On the day of my exam, i watched mini summary videos and did questions to prepare. We also had lots of time in lessons to revise, as some of my teachers were off during our exams. That meant we had time to revise. The biggest thing is not doing too much at once though, or too much of the same thing. This is just because neglecting talking to other people can just stress you out and make it worse. Some people obviously crammed though and i know they got high grades. Its just what you prefer! But dont worry, i jumped up grades in my actual exams because of preparation!
Original post by CarysEmma
To be honest, I did different things for different subjects. Around January I started to revise and make loads of flashcards for everything. Most of GCSE is just memorisation, which is both annoying and amazing. My english literature has always been around the 6/7 mark so i asked my teacher for past questions for her to mark. I did around 6 essays altogether, which sounds like alot but over time, it actually isnt that much. On the day of my exam, i watched mini summary videos and did questions to prepare. We also had lots of time in lessons to revise, as some of my teachers were off during our exams. That meant we had time to revise. The biggest thing is not doing too much at once though, or too much of the same thing. This is just because neglecting talking to other people can just stress you out and make it worse. Some people obviously crammed though and i know they got high grades. Its just what you prefer! But dont worry, i jumped up grades in my actual exams because of preparation!

Ahh thank youu
Original post by _Rusty_
Do drs not talk to people?

They do but they said there better at chemistry than biology and for a dr biology is the like leading subject wheres for pharmacy chemistry is
for both you still need to know how to communicate
Original post by doughnutsareslay
They do but they said there better at chemistry than biology and for a dr biology is the like leading subject wheres for pharmacy chemistry is
for both you still need to know how to communicate

I wouldn't say really there is a leading subject in medicine. It is impossible to break down entire careers into one or two different points. Thats why OP should read around the jobs.
Yep i agree ahaha im only in y10 lmao i dont know much about medicine either way
Original post by doughnutsareslay
Yep i agree ahaha im only in y10 lmao i dont know much about medicine either way

Well maybe don't give out advice then:smile:
lmao okay I was just trying to help.
Original post by doughnutsareslay
lmao okay I was just trying to help.


That's fine and its greatly appreciated but help in areas where you know the answers to things rather than guessing.
Reply 12
Medicine tends to be more contact with the patients and so, in that respect, i would prefer a career where there is less time in labs and more time with the patients. Despite this, Pharmacy can still have contact with people but in a different aspect. I was just wondering if anyone knew how similar those would be in the respect of spending time with people.
Original post by CarysEmma
Medicine tends to be more contact with the patients and so, in that respect, i would prefer a career where there is less time in labs and more time with the patients. Despite this, Pharmacy can still have contact with people but in a different aspect. I was just wondering if anyone knew how similar those would be in the respect of spending time with people.

The thing to remember is to be a Dr there is one degree: medicine.

However you're talking about pharmacology, which is a bit different to pharmacy. Read about it here

I'm a bit out of my depth now so going to tag @artful_lounger to see if they can advise about the lifestyle in pharmacy/pharamcology/etc
Original post by _Rusty_
The thing to remember is to be a Dr there is one degree: medicine.

However you're talking about pharmacology, which is a bit different to pharmacy. Read about it here

I'm a bit out of my depth now so going to tag @artful_lounger to see if they can advise about the lifestyle in pharmacy/pharamcology/etc


@CarysEmma

Not sure what is being mentioned about pharmacology here, as I can't really see any direct references to it as a degree - but in any case as Rusty notes it's a completely different area. Pharmacology is to pharmacy as biomedical sciences is to medicine :smile:

Job wise I imagine someone with a pharmacology degree would, if remaining in a related area and not going into a generalist grad scheme in e.g. corporate management, media, banking, accountancy, the civil service etc, would be a lab based role in a pharma company. However many probably do go into those non-related areas after graduation.

Pharmacists are well, pharmacists. You can probably get an idea of what that involves by arranging work experience at a local community pharmacy. If you don't want to become a pharmacist there's not much point in doing a pharmacy degree.

As noted to become a doctor you need to do a medical degree. There are actually two (small, I believe) specialties within medicine directly related to pharma areas - clinical pharmacology & therapeutics and pharmaceutical medicine. However I expect most if not all specialties will engage with pharmacological and pharmaceutical considerations to some extent, and some quite a bit more than average (I imagine anaesthetics and medical oncology, for example, since they involve a bit more physiology-pharmacology interactions and/or complex medication planning I believe?).
Reply 15
Original post by artful_lounger
@CarysEmma

Not sure what is being mentioned about pharmacology here, as I can't really see any direct references to it as a degree - but in any case as Rusty notes it's a completely different area. Pharmacology is to pharmacy as biomedical sciences is to medicine :smile:

Job wise I imagine someone with a pharmacology degree would, if remaining in a related area and not going into a generalist grad scheme in e.g. corporate management, media, banking, accountancy, the civil service etc, would be a lab based role in a pharma company. However many probably do go into those non-related areas after graduation.

Pharmacists are well, pharmacists. You can probably get an idea of what that involves by arranging work experience at a local community pharmacy. If you don't want to become a pharmacist there's not much point in doing a pharmacy degree.

As noted to become a doctor you need to do a medical degree. There are actually two (small, I believe) specialties within medicine directly related to pharma areas - clinical pharmacology & therapeutics and pharmaceutical medicine. However I expect most if not all specialties will engage with pharmacological and pharmaceutical considerations to some extent, and some quite a bit more than average (I imagine anaesthetics and medical oncology, for example, since they involve a bit more physiology-pharmacology interactions and/or complex medication planning I believe?).

Thank you! I really appreciate this! I would probably be looking into this type of doctor/pharmacy themed career. Its good to know that some aspects of medicine would engage with this area of my interest!

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