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Which one's most competitive? Exeter or Edinburgh? (English lit.) watch

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    So, which one's harder to get in to if you want to study English literature - Exeter (Exeter + Cornwall campuses) or Edinburgh? It seems that English literature is one of the most oversubscribed courses in the UK.

    I like both Edinburgh and Exeter. And I'm also wondering what the difference is between the Exeter and Cornwall campuses? Just location or also lower/higher qualiy?

    Also what other universities have good/renowned English literature courses, but not necessarily top grade requirements and too many applicants (i.e. less than 25% get in)?
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    English lit IS one of the most oversubscribed courses.

    Edinburgh has an amazing reputation as a Uni, it scores highly in the league tables (have a look on The Guardian or The Times websites!) It has entry requirements of BBB which is rather deceiving because it attracts many AAA applicants and therefore, is rather difficult to get into.

    With it's reputation, I'd say Edinburgh although that is without having a great deal of knowledge on Exeter.

    English lit courses that are very very good Oxbridge, Durham, York, Bristol etc... but for that reason are very competitive!

    Look out for the ones with the 5* research rating.

    I've researched English Lit way too much these past few months so, although I can't help you with Exeter, happy to help if I can!
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    I would have thought Exeter. One of the reasons behind the creation of the Cornwall campus was to increase participation from those with non-traditional qualifications or who, for whatever reason, didn't perform well at A-level as others. Due to this, its more modest entry requirements and location, I very much doubt it's more competitive than Edinburgh. Don't be misled by Edinburgh's BBB typical offers for arts courses.

    I'm moving this to the English subforum.
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    (Original post by River85)
    I would have thought Exeter. One of the reasons behind the creation of the Cornwall campus was to increase participation from those with non-traditional qualifications or who, for whatever reason, didn't perform well at A-level as others. Due to this, its more modest entry requirements and location, I very much doubt it's more competitive than Edinburgh. Don't be misled by Edinburgh's BBB typical offers for arts courses.

    I'm moving this to the English subforum.
    She was asking which one was most competitive, River.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    She was asking which one was most competitive, River.
    :o: I know that, I meant to say Edinburgh but, hey, they both begin with an E (and it was five in the morning or something daft like that). Hmmm, just to make it clear...

    Edinburgh is the most competitive. :p:
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    Why the schwing do they say their typical offer's a BBB, when in fact it's much higher?

    I read that many lectures at the Exeter Cornwall campus are televised via a communication link from Exeter campus or something like that? I find that a little offputting. Opinions, experiences, thoughts, anyone?
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    (Original post by motherofpearl)
    Why the schwing do they say their typical offer's a BBB, when in fact it's much higher?
    For Edinburgh you mean? When I was at the open day they said that even though you may in practice need AAA/AAB prediction to get an offer, once you do it'll only be BBB. I haven't heard of anyone being asked higher than their typical offer (but then again I don't know many people who went...)
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    (Original post by motherofpearl)
    Why the schwing do they say their typical offer's a BBB, when in fact it's much higher?

    I read that many lectures at the Exeter Cornwall campus are televised via a communication link from Exeter campus or something like that? I find that a little offputting. Opinions, experiences, thoughts, anyone?
    To answer the BBB bit:

    Because the course ranks so highly and attracts top candidates, they have applicants with better grades to pick from. It makes sense to pick AAA/AAB applicants over BBB really - but they should up their entry requirements!

    I have a couple of friends applying to Oxbridge. And they put Edinburgh as one of their other choices...

    Beautiful city though!
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    (Original post by motherofpearl)
    Why the schwing do they say their typical offer's a BBB, when in fact it's much higher
    Well, it's not really, the typical offer is still almost always BBB. It's just they often expect applicants to have AAA-ABB. But that's not to say an applicant with BBB predicted has no chance of an offer. Scottish ancients don't really have entry requirements than can quite match the top English unis, for various reasons, but not because they are inferior (as, by a rule, they aren't at all).
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    (Original post by motherofpearl)
    Why the schwing do they say their typical offer's a BBB, when in fact it's much higher?
    Because it isn't. The typical offer really is BBB, but obviously that doesn't change anything about the fact that a lot of applicants will be predicted better grades than that. But if they do get an offer, it's likely to be BBB.

    Edit: Damn you, River, for getting there first again.:mad:
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    And I second victoire, you may (unofficially) need AAB or AAA to get an offer but the place will be conditional on BBB.
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    Edinburgh is more competitive. Though BBB is the typical offer, the higher your grades the higher you are up the pecking line. Of course it's isn't just about grades, they put a large emphasis on the personal statement. The College of Humanities and Social Science attracts a lot of candidates.
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    Alright, I think I get it.

    And why is English literature so popular? In some countries it's not very highly regarded. Alright, it's prestigious to have an English degree, but I've heard many people say that English literature (or other literature courses) is for students who don't know what to do with their lives and will probably end up as a teacher at a crappy school with uninspired pupils.
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    (Original post by motherofpearl)
    Alright, I think I get it.

    And why is English literature so popular? In some countries it's not very highly regarded. Alright, it's prestigious to have an English degree, but I've heard many people say that English literature (or other literature courses) is for students who don't know what to do with their lives and will probably end up as a teacher at a crappy school with uninspired pupils.
    Well, I suppose quite a few people base their subject choice on the sort of subjects they enjoyed most / did best in at school, especially if they're not too sure yet what they'd like to do afterwards. English is a popular A-level subject.:dontknow:
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    (Original post by River85)
    Well, it's not really, the typical offer is still almost always BBB. It's just they often expect applicants to have AAA-ABB. But that's not to say an applicant with BBB predicted has no chance of an offer. Scottish ancients don't really have entry requirements than can quite match the top English unis, for various reasons, but not because they are inferior (as, by a rule, they aren't at all).
    it's probably because quite a lot of people dont want to move far away from home and so a lot of people in england will rule out going to uni in scotland because it seems incredibly far away (when in reality it isn't) and also because first year is a lot like A-level/Advanced Higher (it is in the science and engineering school at least).

    edinburgh also put their typical offer lower because tey take into account how a pupil has achieved their grades - if they go to a c**** school in the middle of a city with a terrible record and are predicted BBB then they will not descriminate against that person because of their educational background. also - personal statement is key here, they like to read them (often why it takes a while for an offer to come through)
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    (Original post by motherofpearl)
    Alright, I think I get it.

    And why is English literature so popular? In some countries it's not very highly regarded. Alright, it's prestigious to have an English degree, but I've heard many people say that English literature (or other literature courses) is for students who don't know what to do with their lives and will probably end up as a teacher at a crappy school with uninspired pupils.

    You do get science/maths students with the classic argument of "where will reading a book get you" but I think with an English Lit degree, it says quite a lot about you as a person.

    It is seen as a challenging subject that requires thought and analysis as well as a strong command of English and the ability to present ideas clearly.

    Yes, teaching is one possibility. But the degree in itself can lead to all sorts, not necessarily English literature related (I am sceptical for how many jobs the actual subject would be useful for BUT I think the skills you acquire would be desirable for... something!).

    I think the University you went to also counts for a lot.

    Bear in mind, I also want to do English lit at uni, so maybe I'm just trying to reassure myself! :o:
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    (Original post by FTC199)
    it's probably because quite a lot of people dont want to move far away from home and so a lot of people in england will rule out going to uni in scotland because it seems incredibly far away (when in reality it isn't).
    You think so? (Edinburgh certainly isn't far away from me, but I'm an exception :p: ). I know that there is the attitude amongst some, that it's so far away, some exaggerate it so much that you'd think Scotland was the edge of the earth! (even Leeds, Durham or Newcastle can be too far away for many who live on the south coast like Brighton when, in reality, it's only about 2 - 4 hours on the train).

    But St Andrews still ask for higher grades and so do Glasgow. Some of Glasgow's arts courses are now AAB-ABB. Although I'm a firm believer that both unis are of much the same standard, there's no difference in strength, Edinburgh does have the better reputation and pull amongst most English (and Welsh, we'll leave NI aside for now) sixth formers.

    Whatever the reasons, Edinburgh is in a great position. It's able to undercut many of the English unis, particularly the redbricks (and Edinburgh's arguably stronger in the arts than the redbricks).
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    Can somebody tell me the reason why Edinburgh's Eng lit course is for 4 years? Does this make it a more valuable degree compared to the 3 year English lit offered from say Newcastle and will the student have to pay for the extra year compared to the 3 year courses in England?
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    (Original post by DynDzl)
    Can somebody tell me the reason why Edinburgh's Eng lit course is for 4 years? Does this make it a more valuable degree compared to the 3 year English lit offered from say Newcastle and will the student have to pay for the extra year compared to the 3 year courses in England?
    Because Edinburgh is a Scottish university.
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    (Original post by DynDzl)
    Can somebody tell me the reason why Edinburgh's Eng lit course is for 4 years? Does this make it a more valuable degree compared to the 3 year English lit offered from say Newcastle and will the student have to pay for the extra year compared to the 3 year courses in England?
    As Hobnob said, Scottish University. I think Scottish MAs are considered equivalent to British BAs, but I could be wrong. You will have to pay for the extra year, but the tuition fee for each year is less than half the maximum ( 3,145) so in terms of tuition, 4 years at Edinburgh is the same as/cheaper than 3 years at a good English University. However, the cost of living at Edinburgh will make you cower back in fear; I think the minimum their accomodation costs is 120 pw. And they have 36 week years, I think.
 
 
 
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