The Student Room Group

Applying in another nhs region as a newly qualified nurse

Hi guys,
I just wanted to know if I can apply in another nhs region after I graduate as I am in UWS. For example after I graduate I want to go to Aberdeen to work instead of working in the Glasgow area. I thought you have to apply to where the area you've done all your training in such as GCC or the Highlands.
Original post by Ed12251997
Hi guys,
I just wanted to know if I can apply in another nhs region after I graduate as I am in UWS. For example after I graduate I want to go to Aberdeen to work instead of working in the Glasgow area. I thought you have to apply to where the area you've done all your training in such as GCC or the Highlands.


The only restriction I know of is:
If you trained in Wales and used the full bursary rather than student loan, you have to stay working in Wales (for any health board) for 2 years post qualifying (but can go anywhere else after that initial 2 years).
I don't know of any restrictions in Scotland but @Tracey_W will know if there are.
Original post by Ed12251997
Hi guys,
I just wanted to know if I can apply in another nhs region after I graduate as I am in UWS. For example after I graduate I want to go to Aberdeen to work instead of working in the Glasgow area. I thought you have to apply to where the area you've done all your training in such as GCC or the Highlands.

There's no rules stating that you must work in the health board area you trained in as a student nurse as I applied for a job at the time of nearly qualifying in NHS Grampian health board, NHS Tayside and also NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board for a midwife position as I trained in NHS Lothian health board area which I worked with for nearly 15 months before going back home to the Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board area when I found a midwife position there.

They usually hope that you will stay within the health board area you trained in as reason why they only train xx amount of students in each university but it's up to the individual person where they eventually work about.
Original post by Emily_B
The only restriction I know of is:
If you trained in Wales and used the full bursary rather than student loan, you have to stay working in Wales (for any health board) for 2 years post qualifying (but can go anywhere else after that initial 2 years).
I don't know of any restrictions in Scotland but @Tracey_W will know if there are.


I have not heard of restrictions Emily with you having to stay in the NHS health board area you trained in. As if so I wouldn't have been able to go back to Glasgow after about 15 months.


_____________________________________________________________________________________
This is from recruitment last year for the Glasgow health board area as you'll see further down that nurses were recruited from further afield....
NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde has welcomed more than 650 newly qualified nurses and midwives to its ranks as part of this year’s intake.

The nurses will be working across all of the health board’s hospitals, as well as in communities in all six health and social care partnership areas.

Dr Margaret McGuire, director of nursing at NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC), said: “Given the extra demands of this year, many of our newly qualified nurses have already been working with us as healthcare assistants and I would like to thank them for that.

“This new cohort of nurses and midwives marks a significant and unique recruitment of graduates, and just like last year, reflects one of the most important periods in our history.

“They bring a wealth of additional experience gained during a very testing time in the NHS.
“Their skills and experience will be invaluable in supporting us in our response to Covid-19 as we move into a second winter.
“They have joined us at a time like no other and their experience will stand them in great stead in their careers as they move into their chosen specialisms within healthcare.”

The vast majority of the new workers have come from universities across the west of Scotland and have studied adult nursing, children’s nursing, as well as mental health and learning disability nursing.

Smaller numbers have come from further afield in Scotland and from England.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Ed12251997
Hi guys,
I just wanted to know if I can apply in another nhs region after I graduate as I am in UWS. For example after I graduate I want to go to Aberdeen to work instead of working in the Glasgow area. I thought you have to apply to where the area you've done all your training in such as GCC or the Highlands.


What I would suggest you do is apply for positions in areas that you want to be working in ( if it's Grampian health board - Aberdeenshire area or the Highlands) then if any positions available for you to apply for then you can apply for these and see where it goes regarding interviews etc as I travelled to the one's I said previously to your message for interviews with recieving offer's from them but I got offered a position in Lothian health board which I took as didn't have to uproot until such time I wanted to let
Original post by Tracey_W
There's no rules stating that you must work in the health board area you trained in as a student nurse as I applied for a job at the time of nearly qualifying in NHS Grampian health board, NHS Tayside and also NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board for a midwife position as I trained in NHS Lothian health board area which I worked with for nearly 15 months before going back home to the Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board area when I found a midwife position there.

They usually hope that you will stay within the health board area you trained in as reason why they only train xx amount of students in each university but it's up to the individual person where they eventually work about.


I have not heard of restrictions Emily with you having to stay in the NHS health board area you trained in. As if so I wouldn't have been able to go back to Glasgow after about 15 months.


It's only a Welsh thing, that's probably why you've never heard of it. I only know because one of our newly qualifieds told me - if he'd chosen to train in Wales and take the full bursary (ie the old bursary that we used to have in England that covered all fees etc) he'd have to have stayed working for NHS Wales for 2 years post qualifying, but chose to train in England to give him that bit more freedom to work whichever side of the Welsh/English border he likes.
Original post by Emily_B
It's only a Welsh thing, that's probably why you've never heard of it. I only know because one of our newly qualifieds told me - if he'd chosen to train in Wales and take the full bursary (ie the old bursary that we used to have in England that covered all fees etc) he'd have to have stayed working for NHS Wales for 2 years post qualifying, but chose to train in England to give him that bit more freedom to work whichever side of the Welsh/English border he likes.


Yes I heard that about the Welsh offering newly qualified nursing staff and other health care staff as well a two year contract as part of them training in Wales. It's probably to retain the staffing levels there.

Yah strange how they are doing this to retain there levels of staff numbers as I think that they have problems getting staff to work with there health board.....
Original post by Tracey_W
Yes I heard that about the Welsh offering newly qualified nursing staff and other health care staff as well a two year contract as part of them training in Wales. It's probably to retain the staffing levels there.

Yah strange how they are doing this to retain there levels of staff numbers as I think that they have problems getting staff to work with there health board.....


The funding comes from the Welsh government, hence why they are keen to keep nurses whose training they have funded in Wales. There’s also attractive funding for those who choose to study in the medium of Welsh.

we’ve got six main health boards here, with similar recruitment and retention issues as the rest of the UK (though I believe for those of you north of Hadrians wall have it a little better from what I hear).
Original post by moonkatt
The funding comes from the Welsh government, hence why they are keen to keep nurses whose training they have funded in Wales. There’s also attractive funding for those who choose to study in the medium of Welsh.

we’ve got six main health boards here, with similar recruitment and retention issues as the rest of the UK (though I believe for those of you north of Hadrians wall have it a little better from what I hear).


Every part of the UK has problems with retaining staff regardless of whether they are currently qualified or coming up to qualifying.

Unfortunately the Scottish government provide there staff with a better pay than those South of the border because they appreciate the work we do haha. It's not our fault that our government feels we are better thought of than elsewhere in the UK.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Tracey_W
Every part of the UK has problems with retaining staff regardless of whether they are currently qualified or coming up to qualifying.

Unfortunately the Scottish government provide there staff with a better pay than those South of the border because they appreciate the work we do haha. It's not our fault that our government feels we are better thought of than elsewhere in the UK.

I wouldn't say that's unfortunate :lol:

It'll be interesting to see what pans out there now with the fixed offer the government has made there.
Original post by moonkatt
I wouldn't say that's unfortunate :lol:

It'll be interesting to see what pans out there now with the fixed offer the government has made there.


We shall see what happens when the pay settlement is sorted out as I don't think that the RCN will succeed with there extra 5% above inflation ( about 15% ) pay rise for the staff of the NHS as how is it being paid when you hear massive government cuts ahead.
Reply 10
come to shetland we would love to have you.
Original post by moonkatt
I wouldn't say that's unfortunate :lol:

It'll be interesting to see what pans out there now with the fixed offer the government has made there.


So I understand that nurses in England are only being offered £1,400 rise a year compared to the Scottish offer of just over £2,200 a year ( roughly 11.5%) which is currently going out to ask us with the Union. - big comparison, I think that all the NHS staff throughout the UK should be paid equal. Shouldn't be any difference between the devolved nation's.....

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