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    (Original post by Mush)
    There probably will be, in comparison to most disciplines. But the high end of the Engineering Salary spectrum isn't as high as the Medical spectrum. That's all I was saying. It's all relative.
    I have to disagree. Top consultants can upto £161k p.a.(by which time you're old, and have nothing worth living for.)

    Should an engineer make it big, they make it REALLY big.

    I agree on average, doctors and dentists earn more, but there is much more potential for larger salaries in Engineering than there ever will be for medicine, especially now thanks to the crumbling NHS.
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    (Original post by Profesh)
    Ahh. You know, I actually mistook 'fiat' for an especially flagrant malapropism of 'feat'; more fool me, evidently.
    No, I think you were right; I thought the same. Perhaps we were both wrong, though.
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    :rant:

    A very heated exchange! :hmmmm2:

    I'm not the average engineering student (I'm 28, have worked in a wide variety of jobs, and up until I returned to education 4 years ago, I didn't have a particularly sparkling academic record). But I enjoy Engineering. :o:

    I am in my final year of a part time Foundation Degree in Electronic Engineering and I'm starting full time study next year. I work in R&D in the automotive industry.

    I'll be 33+ (depending on success, placements and the millions of other variables life presents) by the time I get my degree then there's 10 years ish working towards chartership.

    Will I make it? :dontknow: I don't know.
    Will I enjoy the journey? I do at the minute, and that hopefully won't change.
    Will it be worth it? Again I don't know, but if consider that I'm happier now than I've been doing anything else, It hopefully will be. Besides, I could be doing worse things with my time.

    PS It's good that some posters have so much pride in their chosen path, but, is it necessary to snipe at other people's vocations? Probably not. It's likely that each of your future employers will be looking for the "ability to work in multi-disciplinary teams" so remember the barbed comments you posted when you lie to the interviewers face about effective communication, team working and mutual respect.

    PPS for all those who respect the other person for trying just as hard as they do, in whatever field of endeavour, I salute you.

    And to both groups good luck in your studies and career! I know what type of people I'd rather work with regardless of my profession

    Rant over! :wavey:
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    (Original post by Mush)
    Well it depends how you want to look at it. Anything is 'noble' so long as it's not fun to do, and you persist at it anyway. If being a Doctor was easy peasy, and patients brought you flowers, and you worked 9-5, and people never died then it wouldn't be noble at all. The reason it's noble is because you're working a lot more hours than other professions during unsociable times of the day and in longer shifts. Most patients hate you and don't appreciate your care one bit, your patients die all the time, and it has massive effects on your personal life - most doctors can kiss goodbye to a regular night out each weekend and a steady partner until they're 35+. So is it worth it? I most certainly don't think that being considered 'noble' is worth going through that. For 2 reasons:

    1) The people who would consider you to be 'noble' is the public, and the public don't have a clue. If the public hailed me as the next Jesus, I wouldn't think anything of it, because these are the people who follow the every footstep of Britney Spears and Abi Titmuss via The Sun.

    2) It's not REAL 'nobility'. It's by default. You haven't achieved anything to become noble, you've just put up with harsh conditions for a lot longer than any self-respecting human being would .

    So who do you think deserves more credit, the Doctor who puts people into MRI machines and reads their scans, or two SCIENTISTS/ENGINEERS who made that technology possible by engineering the machine to begin with? I can tell you that not a single doctor has received the Nobel Prize for operating an MRI machine, but those two scientists/engineers got it.

    Who gets more credit, Alexander Fleming (Chemist/Biologist/Engineer) who invented penecillin, or the doctors who prescribe it?

    Worshiping the doctor above the engineer is like worshiping the pilot of an aircraft over the guy who gave him the means to fly. Without Engineers, medicine would be useless and 'faith healers' would be in big business.

    And equally, you just trivialised Engineering as building buildings??!?!?!? Hahaha.
    This thread should have ended after this.

    I also agree that it should be about what you enjoy doing rather than what you'll get out of it. Especially for medical careers (and Engineering), how far you go in your caeer depends on whether your heart is really in what you do. I changed my mind about medicine and went with engineering cause I know i'd be a good doctor but an excellent engineer. The rewards of both engineering and medicine depend on the work you put in, but as far as prospects go and moving up in your career, engineering is not a dead end, as a matter of fact there is a limitless number of things you can do with engineering. Do something you're good at and will enjoy.
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    MUSH, i sooo totally agree with you mate!
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    Yes.
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    Mush speaks the truth
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    (Original post by Mush)
    Best advice ever.

    Basing your career on money will indefinitely lead you to banking/medicine/dentistry.

    Basing your career on travel will indefinitely lead you to aviation/engineering/environmental subjects.

    Basing your career on WHAT YOU ENJOY will indefinitely lead you to happiness.

    I know which one I'd prefer.
    But surely, earning more money enables you to do the things that you love in life..like go on more holidays, move up the social ladder, freedom to spoil yourself etc.

    I suppose there is a compromise.
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    (Original post by Soya15)
    But surely, earning more money enables you to do the things that you love in life..like go on more holidays, move up the social ladder, freedom to spoil yourself etc.

    I suppose there is a compromise.
    Lol. And what is it about Medicine that thrusts its professionals higher up the social ladder and makes them more able to go on holidays than Engineers?

    That's right. Nothing. In making a comparison between Engineering and Medicine (the point of this thread), it's easy to conclude that Engineers have more freedom to spoil themselves, since they tend to have regular shifts and sociable hours, and a hell of a lot more holidays.
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    (Original post by Mush)
    Lol. And what is it about Medicine that thrusts its professionals higher up the social ladder and makes them more able to go on holidays than Engineers?

    That's right. Nothing. In making a comparison between Engineering and Medicine (the point of this thread), it's easy to conclude that Engineers have more freedom to spoil themselves, since they tend to have regular shifts and sociable hours, and a hell of a lot more holidays.
    I thought the point of this thread was to debate over whether engineering for a career is a dead end or not (which from my perspective is not a dead end):

    Hey there, I'm just wondering if this is true. After reading some articles on the internet on this forum, I get the feeling engineering is poorly paid and has little room for progression, which is annoying as I chose doing a degree in it over something like Dentistry.

    Can anyone give their views whether this is true or false?

    Thanks


    since your original post which mine was a respone to was making some pretty rough generalisations, mine was also pretty general in the context of your original post. Wouldn't you agree that generally, it would be very unlikely that people on lower incomes/benefits would have a better lifestyle than high income earners?
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    (Original post by Soya15)
    I thought the point of this thread was to debate over whether engineering for a career is a dead end or not (which from my perspective is not a dead end):

    Hey there, I'm just wondering if this is true. After reading some articles on the internet on this forum, I get the feeling engineering is poorly paid and has little room for progression, which is annoying as I chose doing a degree in it over something like Dentistry.

    Can anyone give their views whether this is true or false?

    Thanks


    since your original post which mine was a respone to was making some pretty rough generalisations, mine was also pretty general in the context of your original post. Wouldn't you agree that generally, it would be very unlikely that people on lower incomes/benefits would have a better lifestyle than high income earners?
    Yeah... the OP was wondering if it was highly paid or not, and had much progression, and thought it would be rather annoying if it didn't as he would prefer a job in Engineering over Dentistry/Medicine or the likes... And then much debating about the differences ensued.

    As a general case, you're right, lower incomes usually means less sufficient lifestyles. But there are a lot of cases where there is a REASON that a certain career is so highly paid, and these reasons lead the lifestyle of the professional to deteriorate. Sometimes large salaries are something of a compensation for the freedom and security that is lost in undertaking certain professions, in which case a lower paid career would benefit a person much more.
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    (Original post by Mush)
    Yeah... the OP was wondering if it was highly paid or not, and had much progression, and thought it would be rather annoying if it didn't as he would prefer a job in Engineering over Dentistry/Medicine or the likes... And then much debating about the differences ensued.

    As a general case, you're right, lower incomes usually means less sufficient lifestyles. But there are a lot of cases where there is a REASON that a certain career is so highly paid, and these reasons lead the lifestyle of the professional to deteriorate. Sometimes large salaries are something of a compensation for the freedom and security that is lost in undertaking certain professions, in which case a lower paid career would benefit a person much more.
    hmm... freedom and security?
    I see what you mean - you have to work extremely hard and go overtime in certain careers to get that big salary but I don't think it affects your security. There is nothing wrong with working hard and sacrificing your time and effort to get that big apartment you've always wanted or whatever. People sometimes enjoy it and have that particular work ethic.

    I guess it depends on the individual. Whenever i think of an individual with a high income, i tend to form a successful person image in my head. if that successful person can't manage a work life balance and spend the money and his time wisely then he wouldn't be successful if that's what your point is?

    anyway as for the OP you can't really tell unless you've tried both professions out in the real world yourself. and there are so much variation in terms of the opportunities for promotion availabe which is different depending on the company you work for. you can't just say oh i wish i studied law otherwise the pay would have been better because you can not exactly guarantee a higher salary.
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    (Original post by Soya15)
    hmm... freedom and security?
    I see what you mean - you have to work extremely hard and go overtime in certain careers to get that big salary but I don't think it affects your security. There is nothing wrong with working hard and sacrificing your time and effort to get that big apartment you've always wanted or whatever. People sometimes enjoy it and have that particular work ethic.

    I guess it depends on the individual. Whenever i think of an individual with a high income, i tend to form a successful person image in my head. if that successful person can't manage a work life balance and spend the money and his time wisely then he wouldn't be successful if that's what your point is?

    anyway as for the OP you can't really tell unless you've tried both professions out in the real world yourself. and there are so much variation in terms of the opportunities for promotion availabe which is different depending on the company you work for. you can't just say oh i wish i studied law otherwise the pay would have been better because you can not exactly guarantee a higher salary.
    By security I mean physical security. A lot of jobs that pay well are dangerous, and that's why they pay well. Oil rigs, the military, and hospital etc...

    It does depend on the individual. In most graduate jobs, you have financial security. So the differentiation between the lifestyles or higher earners and lower earners within that spectrum depends on a great number of things. I would gladly turn down a 200K per annum job as a consultant surgeon, in turn for a 50K job as a sub-managerial engineer. The lifestyle that comes with the latter would make me a much happier person, and the things I want in life are not outwith the realms of such a salary.
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    Does money buy happiness. It might, but does it buy career satisfaction?

    Does it ****
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    Do medical engineers also get a NHS Bursery like doctors do? Sorry for changing the subject
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    (Original post by 101joce)
    Do medical engineers also get a NHS Bursery like doctors do? Sorry for changing the subject
    no
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    ok, so I read this WHOLE thread and it seems like most people are quite intelligent and seem to be very passionate about their respective fields.

    I am currently in college doing a course in Electrical/Electronic Engineering (BTEC National Diploma).

    Some people here are stating that Doctors will earn more then engineers, well to a certain extent its true... BUT this is a very vague comparison... it depends on a lot of factors.

    In Medicine, the people that earn the most are probably consultants who earn £73,403 to £173,638 (Info from the NHS)

    Though, you cant earn much more then this unless you cure AIDS or cancer etc.

    The most you can earn in engineering comes probably when you become a Chartered Engineer

    where you earn from 30k-89k (really depends on where you work and in what part of engineering).


    So, lets say that the best Consultant earns 174k, and the best engineer earns 90k. There is quite a bit of difference as you can clearly see.

    BUT, in engineering you are are always trying to develop and innovate (new electronic devices, buildings, bridges etc) while in medicine you are usually just working on helping people (as a GP, dentist etc)

    The fact of the matter is, you can much more easily advance is engineering then you can in Medicine. By advance I mean you can change a particular field such as Electronic Engineering by creating new devices such as new tv's, mp3 players, communication systems etc.

    This can be proved by just looking at how fast engineering has progressed compared to Medicine:

    From the 1940's - 1990's we were able to develop the first proper computers, then in the next 50 years we were able to develop them so much, that now we have computers going from being as big as a huge room, to being smaller then a hair (im referring to nanotechnology and its advances now)

    Engineers have made it possible to see cells and viruses, as well as us being able to explore the depths of our universe.

    In medicine, there has never been as much progress over a period of 50 years without the use of the microscope or an engineering device.

    I am not stating that Medicine is less valuable then engineering, I am only saying that it is harder to progress in medicine then in engineering.

    Considering that engineering is a field that is easier to progress and innovate in, then there is no real limit to the money you can earn, if you are good enough, you can be richer then Bill gates.

    It is also important to note, that the richest people in the world did not use medicine to earn money, they using engineering and technology.

    Well... thats all I had to say.
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    yeah, i agree with that.... i mean, if you invented something like.... artificial gravity perhaps? you arent going to donate it for the good of mankind, are you? you are going to sell it for the good of mankind!

    there really is no financial limit in engineering. although amount of cash is directly proportional to the brilliance and marketability of your creation!


    im strange, kill me.
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    (Original post by Richiboi)
    there really is no financial limit in engineering. although amount of cash is directly proportional to the brilliance and marketability of your creation!
    Your post reminded me of a MSc I saw a while back:
    http://www.ceg.ncl.ac.uk/info/pdf/msc%20sen.pdf
    not to sure if that degree will give a good rate of return, or what the job prospects will be like but it sounds interesting.
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    i guess that looks like a good postgrad- adds business knowledge to engineering experience you have.
    still, i havent had my first offer for civil yet, no time to be thinking of such things yet!
 
 
 
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