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    In a world filled with mobile phones and social networking websites, is face-to-face talk is being pushed to the margins? Is conversation alive or dead in your country?

    Journalist Catherine Blyth argues in The Art of Conversation that while this form of communication is vital to human intimacy and development we now have fewer and fewer opportunities to have ordinary conversations.

    We are too distracted by emails and text messages to engage in face-to-face chat, Blyth suggests.

    Blyth also argues that the historical periods when conversation was most revered were also the times most fruitful for "reason, invention and respect for the individual".

    Are you too busy or too distracted to have conversations? Is face-to-face chat important in your country? Does modern technology help or hinder conversation?
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    It would appear said 'art' is dead with you...

    Personally, I prefer one-on-one; I hate phones
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    Of course conversation isn't dead. Perhaps if you were a hermit who didn't leave your front door then you would be lacking in the conversation area but everyone else must have daily encounters with other people?

    I mean conversations are rife in the work place, at school, college, university etc.
    Yes people use other methods in order to communicate, but often such methods e.g. texting, are used to facilitate the arrangement of "real-life" experiences and meetings.
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    (Original post by arisk01)
    It would appear said 'art' is dead with you...

    Personally, I prefer one-on-one; I hate phones
    Me too. I hate having phone conversations other than to make arrangements, say you're late etc...

    Same with texting. I'd I'm going to have a decent conversation, I prefer it face to face. You miss out on facial expressions etc...
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    Is it?!!! No.

    Just think that technological forms of conversion eg. texting, social network sites, telephone, add an extra dimension to communication and human interfacing (didn't mean that to sound so robotic and non human). And agree that these forms of communication facilitate face to face conversation.

    But if anything, it just helps us to communicate - we don't communicate face to face any less, just that when we are not in a position to communicate face to face it extends the possibility of communication, so we can, in effect, communicate more. If that makes sense, I realise that was very Rumsfeldesque.
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    This argument was put forward by a woman suprise-suprise.
    I remember reading in a New Scientist magazine that when talking in chatrooms/to chatbots, women felt less of a connection with the other person/machine because of the lack of facial expression and voice.
    Women are emotionally needy creatures and so require all the "human intimacy" mojo.
 
 
 
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