Cracker Watch

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Tina
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#1
STUDENT EXPELLED FOR "CRACKER" REMARK

Wed. June 12, 2002

JUNCTION CITY, OR (AP) Wally Jackson isn't the type of kid you'd think would be expelled from the
sixth grade. His grades put him in the top three quarters of his class, and according to Christina
Hinton, his teacher at Oaklea Middle School, he has never been in serious trouble. In fact, the only
disciplinary action on his record was a trip to the principal's office in the third grade, when he
pulled Mary McKenna's ponytail in science class.

Yet, he's been expelled for at least the remainder of the school year. According to Carla Laviss,
the headmaster at Oaklea, his language last week in the school's cafeteria "was an unacceptable
breach of the school's disciplinary code. Such language is not acceptable at Oaklea." The school's
disciplinary code prohibits "profanity, racially charged language, or threats of violence or
unlawful activity."

The language in question? Wally was expelled for using the term -- cracker. As in saltine, Cheez-It,
or, in Wally's case, Ritz.

According to Tommy Jackson, Wally's younger brother, Wally used this term when he turned to another
boy in the lunchroom and asked him "Would you like this cracker?" (An investigation later revealed
that Wally was negotiating for a piece of chewing gum belonging to the other boy.) This comment was
overheard by John Stargis, the gym coach, who had been passing through the cafeteria. Apparently
because the other boy was of a different race (the boy is white, Wally is African-American), Mr.
Stargis thought that Wally had asked "Would you like this, cracker?" the word "cracker" used as a
racial epithet. After a discplinary hearing, in which Mr. Stargis and the other boy (but not Wally)
were allowed to testify, Wally was expelled.

You'd think that Wally should have been allowed to speak at the hearing, right? To explain the
context of his use of "racially charged language"? Wally didn't need to be heard, said Ms. Laviss,
because Wally had admitted using the word "cracker" and because "cracker is an offensive term.
Everyone at that table, especially Wally, knew of the inherent offensiveness of that word and its
inappropriate usage."

"Inherent offensiveness"? It's not clear who might find "cracker" inherently offensive. Surely not
the good people of Nabisco, who put this word right on the front of every box of Ritz. (Nabisco is a
subsidiary of Kraft Foods.) To be sure, "cracker" sometimes may be more offensive than other words,
such as, say,"niggardly." Recall that in 1999, Washington, DC staffer David Howard was fired (but
later re-hired) by mayor Anthony Williams for using "niggardly," a word meaning "grudgingly mean
about spending or granting." But "niggardly" isn't a racial epithet (though it sounds like one),
while "cracker" can be a racial slur when used in a certain context.

Wally doesn't know exactly what "context" means. He does know that he has to take the bus to a
"special" school each morning, and that he can no longer play on the Oaklea baseball team. Tom
Endersby, the principal at Oaklea, says that he was not involved in the decision to expel Wally,
but that Wally can return to school in the fall if he takes a "racial sensitivity" class over
the summer.

Until then, Wally should get used to eating "salted flatbread snacks" for lunch.
0
Cybercypher
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[email protected] (tina) burbled news:[email protected]:

[q1]> STUDENT EXPELLED FOR "CRACKER" REMARK[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Wed. June 12, 2002[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> JUNCTION CITY, OR (AP) Wally Jackson isn't the type of kid[/q1]

[...]

Where did you get this? The Washington Post and AP archives have no record of this story. It's
probably just a put-on.

--
Franke: ". . . you obviously don't have a clue. I do, from firsthand experienced, and there's both
gay and straight men in this thread who'd dispute your 'straight men don't have homosexual sex'
statement." Mike Cleven Grammar 1: Internalized rules for the spoken language. Grammar 2: Formal
rules for the written language. Grammar 1 does not equal Grammar 2.
0
Ale.Complain
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#3
Report 17 years ago
#3
http://www.orientaldaily.com.hk/cgi-...cgi?seq=248400

http://www.orientaldaily.com.hk/cgi-...cgi?seq=248401

http://www.orientaldaily.com.hk/cgi-...cgi?seq=248402

All friends, this is a news for complain ale. Please join us, I would help you.

mailto:[email protected]

ALE Complain

10/06/2002 ???? ?? 2 A 24

tina <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
[q1]> STUDENT EXPELLED FOR "CRACKER" REMARK[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Wed. June 12, 2002[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> JUNCTION CITY, OR (AP) Wally Jackson isn't the type of kid you'd think would be expelled from the[/q1]
[q1]> sixth grade. His grades put him in the top three quarters of his class, and according to Christina[/q1]
[q1]> Hinton, his teacher at Oaklea Middle School, he has never been in serious trouble. In fact, the[/q1]
[q1]> only disciplinary action on his record was a trip to the principal's office in the third grade,[/q1]
[q1]> when he pulled Mary McKenna's ponytail in science class.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Yet, he's been expelled for at least the remainder of the school year. According to Carla Laviss,[/q1]
[q1]> the headmaster at Oaklea, his language last week in the school's cafeteria "was an unacceptable[/q1]
[q1]> breach of the school's disciplinary code. Such language is not acceptable at Oaklea." The school's[/q1]
[q1]> disciplinary code prohibits "profanity, racially charged language, or threats of violence or[/q1]
[q1]> unlawful activity."[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> The language in question? Wally was expelled for using the term -- cracker. As in saltine,[/q1]
[q1]> Cheez-It, or, in Wally's case, Ritz.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> According to Tommy Jackson, Wally's younger brother, Wally used this term when he turned to[/q1]
[q1]> another boy in the lunchroom and asked him "Would you like this cracker?" (An investigation later[/q1]
[q1]> revealed that Wally was negotiating for a piece of chewing gum belonging to the other boy.) This[/q1]
[q1]> comment was overheard by John Stargis, the gym coach, who had been passing through the cafeteria.[/q1]
[q1]> Apparently because the other boy was of a different race (the boy is white, Wally is[/q1]
[q1]> African-American), Mr. Stargis thought that Wally had asked "Would you like this, cracker?" the[/q1]
[q1]> word "cracker" used as a racial epithet. After a discplinary hearing, in which Mr. Stargis and the[/q1]
[q1]> other boy (but not Wally) were allowed to testify, Wally was expelled.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> You'd think that Wally should have been allowed to speak at the hearing, right? To explain the[/q1]
[q1]> context of his use of "racially charged language"? Wally didn't need to be heard, said Ms. Laviss,[/q1]
[q1]> because Wally had admitted using the word "cracker" and because "cracker is an offensive term.[/q1]
[q1]> Everyone at that table, especially Wally, knew of the inherent offensiveness of that word and its[/q1]
[q1]> inappropriate usage."[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> "Inherent offensiveness"? It's not clear who might find "cracker" inherently offensive. Surely not[/q1]
[q1]> the good people of Nabisco, who put this word right on the front of every box of Ritz. (Nabisco is[/q1]
[q1]> a subsidiary of Kraft Foods.) To be sure, "cracker" sometimes may be more offensive than other[/q1]
[q1]> words, such as, say,"niggardly." Recall that in 1999, Washington, DC staffer David Howard was[/q1]
[q1]> fired (but later re-hired) by mayor Anthony Williams for using "niggardly," a word meaning[/q1]
[q1]> "grudgingly mean about spending or granting." But "niggardly" isn't a racial epithet (though it[/q1]
[q1]> sounds like one), while "cracker" can be a racial slur when used in a certain context.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Wally doesn't know exactly what "context" means. He does know that he has to take the bus to a[/q1]
[q1]> "special" school each morning, and that he can no longer play on the Oaklea baseball team. Tom[/q1]
[q1]> Endersby, the principal at Oaklea, says that he was not involved in the decision to expel Wally,[/q1]
[q1]> but that Wally can return to school in the fall if he takes a "racial sensitivity" class over[/q1]
[q1]> the summer.[/q1]
[q1]>[/q1]
[q1]> Until then, Wally should get used to eating "salted flatbread snacks" for lunch.[/q1]
0
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