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Just how important is the University's reputation to you? watch

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    (Original post by IanDangerously)
    Wait ... if reputation and prestige were the ultimate factor then why did you choose nottinghham for a business related course? ABS is one of the highest ranked business schools in England. :confused:
    Yes indeed ABS is one of the highest ranked business schools in England and surpasses Nottingham in the Time's ranking however in terms of overall prestige, name, and reputation, then Nottingham would surpass Aston. I loved Aston as much as Nottingham and to make a choice between the two was very tough, it was either study at a business school which is ranked very highly or to study at a university which is more well-known so to speak..

    Another factor was that Nottingham Uni is in a closed campus whereas Aston is based in the city with it's buildings spread around am I right? Therefore the amount of pollution as well as noise is certainly something which I don't wish to experience not after coming from De Montfort which is also a city campus..
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    (Original post by kuka)
    I don't think so - maybe for psychology that is the case, but I am still not entirely convinced that a DMU degree is on par with a Oxford degree even for that subject.

    Well that's the thing accredited Psychology degrees are standardised so they are comparable from uni's across the UK . A student obtaining a 1st at DMU in psychology would get a job over someone who obtains a second at Oxford.
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    (Original post by Joanna May)
    It's very important to me. I don't see why you'd go to a less prestigious university if you could go to a better one. Pretty much everyone I know is having fun at uni, so if you could be happy almost anywhere then I don't see why you wouldn't go for the more prestigious you could.

    It's not for 'fun' factor alone - it's about quality. Some people opt for 'lower' universities because they're actually higher quality (either objectively or subjectively).
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    (Original post by KadeK)
    Well that's the thing accredited Psychology degrees are standardised so they are comparable from uni's across the UK . A student obtaining a 1st at DMU in psychology would get a job over someone who obtains a second at Oxford.
    Not true, they are given a list of topics that they must include, that's pretty much it.

    An electrical engineering degree from Southampton Solent is accredited, yet needs grades EEe and only teaches lectures on Monday and Tuesday. A first from there can no way be compared to one at a better uni.

    However there isn't going to be much difference between say Bristol and Sheffield, employers won't care there.
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    (Original post by Snobpence17)
    Not true, they are given a list of topics that they must include, that's pretty much it.

    An electrical engineering degree from Southampton Solent is accredited, yet needs grades EEe and only teaches lectures on Monday and Tuesday. A first from there can no way be compared to one at a better uni.

    However there isn't going to be much difference between say Bristol and Sheffield, employers won't care there.
    You can't judge quality on contact hours of entry requirements.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    You can't judge quality on contact hours of entry requirements.
    :rolleyes:

    Why would Southampton Solent be an engineering powerhouse compared to Bristol when it accepts people who have probably only written their name on the exam papers to get their grades, then only have to do two days of lectures?
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    (Original post by Snobpence17)
    :rolleyes:

    Why would Southampton Solent be an engineering powerhouse compared to Bristol when it accepts people who have probably only written their name on the exam papers to get their grades, then only have to do two days of lectures?
    So you do all of your work in your lectures and nothing outside? Slacking off a bit there, don't you think?
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    (Original post by SiaSiaSia)
    I suppose it's that whole show-off factor isn't it?
    Not really, I think there is a bit more to it than that; there is for me anyway.

    I have purposely applied to 5 unis with a solid reputation (Southampton, Nottingham etc.) I want to go to university where the teaching will be of a decent standard, where there will be good facilities, both academic and non academic, where the staff and lecturers will be at the forefront of their fields, and somewhere that an employer will look highly upon.

    Going to university costs a lot of money, and while your there, you should at least spend a lot of time working hard and putting in the effort (in your 2nd/3rd year anyway). I didn't want to walk into £30+ grand of debt to come out with a degree that isn't even worth the paper its written on.

    In conclusion, the reputation of a university is important to me. But it's not the only factor I would, and will, consider when deciding where to go. Providing the 2 universities are both considered "decent" despite one having a slightly "worse" reputation (if you see what I mean) then I would go to the one which I prefer in other ways - i.e. its location.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    So you do all of your work in your lectures and nothing outside? Slacking off a bit there, don't you think?
    /facepalm

    obviously not. But I expect to go to univeristy to be taught, in something as rigorous as an engineering degree you need to be having 9-5 lectures every week day to do well. Unless you're at somewhere terrible.
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    (Original post by KadeK)
    A student obtaining a 1st at DMU in psychology would get a job over someone who obtains a second at Oxford.
    In theory yes, but in reality that's unlikely to happen.
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    (Original post by Snobpence17)
    /facepalm

    obviously not. But I expect to go to univeristy to be taught, in something as rigorous as an engineering degree you need to be having 9-5 lectures every week day to do well. Unless you're at somewhere terrible.
    Nowhere, but nowhere is going to have 9-5 lectures every weekday. When I was at Brizzle we didn't have anywhere near that (studying maths) kind of workload, and I seem to recall the engineers being more slack than we were.
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    (Original post by MrShifty)
    Nowhere, but nowhere is going to have 9-5 lectures every weekday. When I was at Brizzle we didn't have anywhere near that (studying maths) kind of workload, and I seem to recall the engineers being more slack than we were.
    Precisely. Rigorous courses aren't rigorous only because of timetabled hours.
    :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by MrShifty)
    Nowhere, but nowhere is going to have 9-5 lectures every weekday. When I was at Brizzle we didn't have anywhere near that (studying maths) kind of workload, and I seem to recall the engineers being more slack than we were.
    What I meant was you leave at 9 and come back at 5, basically having that time containing lectures of all sorts, and lunch et.c, not stone set 9 to 5.

    You expect to have a timetable of contact time every day from a good university in such a demanding subject.

    You don't expect to go to university and be given a few lectures over two days of the week.

    If they are of equal quality, then why wouldn't everyone go for the easy option?
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Precisely. Rigorous courses aren't rigorous only because of timetabled hours.
    :rolleyes:
    Would you consider an EEE degree from Bristol equal to one from Solent?
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    (Original post by Snobpence17)
    Would you consider an EEE degree from Bristol equal to one from Solent?
    Yes, I would. Degrees might not specifically be standardised, but there are many, many checks on them to ensure than a 2:1 is worth the same everywhere. With regards to the ways those things are learnt, differences occur; and a degree from Bristol might be worth more within employment since there's still elitism, but essentially I believe two people the same level of degree are at the same level.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Yes, I would. Degrees might not specifically be standardised, but there are many, many checks on them to ensure than a 2:1 is worth the same everywhere. With regards to the ways those things are learnt, differences occur; and a degree from Bristol might be worth more within employment since there's still elitism, but essentially I believe two people the same level of degree are at the same level.
    Basically you're saying it's unfair to discriminate against the guy who couldn't be bothered to try in his A-levels and degree, and he should be considered equal to the guy who has done some work to achieve good results in a harder course.

    That's what is really unfair in this, when hardworking people are undermimed by those who can't be arsed yet go to uni for a four year piss up and a little bit of work.

    And that's all I can be bothered to say, means less competition for me.
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    (Original post by Snobpence17)
    Basically you're saying it's unfair to discriminate against the guy who couldn't be bothered to try in his A-levels and degree, and he should be considered equal to the guy who has done some work to achieve good results in a harder course.

    That's what is really unfair in this, when hardworking people are undermimed by those who can't be arsed yet go to uni for a four year piss up and a little bit of work.

    And that's all I can be bothered to say, means less competition for me.

    No, I'm not saying it's unfair to discriminate against him if he's not worked as hard; of course not. Don't know at all where you got that from.
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    (Original post by Snobpence17)
    Basically you're saying it's unfair to discriminate against the guy who couldn't be bothered to try in his A-levels and degree, and he should be considered equal to the guy who has done some work to achieve good results in a harder course.
    Nice non-sequitor there. Why is it a harder course? Just because it is more popular (the key driving force for admissions offers btw)? Why is it assumed that the person in question wouldn't have tried in their degree? If they got a good grade they will have tried.
    Why should I really care if someone did badly in their A-levels if they have done well in their degree? What's the point in caring about the fact that someone got an A or a C in chemistry if they have a first class degree in the subject? Surely the latter supercedes the former just a little doesn't it?

    That's what is really unfair in this, when hardworking people are undermimed by those who can't be arsed yet go to uni for a four year piss up and a little bit of work.
    But they aren't. People who have better degree classifications are not undermined by those that have worse ones in any way at all.
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    Not really too bothered. I plan to work for myself after uni.
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    It is important, but not important enough that I would go to a Uni solely for that.

    I've applied to Edinburgh, Leeds, Nottingham, Manchester and Sheffield. They all have a solid reputation as Universities, but admittedly they are not as prestigious as say Warwick or LSE by any stretch. I seriously think I could have had an offer from Warwick (LSE probably a bit too far) with a small bit of luck, but opted not to even give it a go. That's because I wouldn't want to spend my Uni life in Coventry or thereabouts, LSE because of London. Out of that list Sheffield is a non-starter (Got an offer, but was more of a just incase option), but the rest I'm still pondering on. (Still need offers/rejections from Leeds and Edinburgh though) Notts probably has the best reputation, although I think Leeds is where I can see myself studying for 3 years and not too far from home (Newcastle) so can easily come up to see my pals. Edinburgh probably has the best mix of enjoyment and prestige out of the list.

    What I'm saying is, I don't think you should sacrifice everything for reputation, but you should take into account as a big factor and if possible get into one with a good reputation. Personally I wouldn't at all study at an ex-poly basically because of their rep's.
 
 
 
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