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    (Original post by IcEmAn911)
    Whatever.. Probably under constant racist abuse and being laughed at?? Question, have you ever seen a chinese plumber in the UK? probably not, have you ever wondered why?.
    What an excuse!
    My plumber is Chinese :yep:
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    (Original post by LOCI)
    i missed by conditional by 200 points but still got into my first choice.....and im in my second year now and doing just fine!
    200 points ?!?!
    Thats like ....
    two B grades or
    1 A and a C or
    2C's and an E
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    I don't think DDD/EEE will get you anywhere worthwhile with your studies - though it might be fun. What about a foundation course in something, setting you up for a big, lucrative course.
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    (Original post by ashy)
    Fair enough then, I suppose you are an exception, possibly. Where do you think you'd be now if you had decided to get a job or apprenticeship or something similar, though?
    There are a fair number of people who graudate with good degrees from ex-polys and then get accepted into some of our leading unis (yes, that does include Oxbridge) at postgrad level. These exceptions probably aren't as rare as you think

    I do like it how people still have the impression ex-polys (or any uni that have DDDs as a typical offer) only offer film studies. A course, I may add, offered at top unis also (Warwick, possibly KCL).
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    If you're over 21, Birkbeck Uni of London will accept you without any A levels, providing you show the right interest and willingness for the course you want. If you're under 21, they ask that you hvae done A levels, no stipulations about grades.

    And there's no way you can say that Birkbeck is an easy option, a mickey mouse uni, or that a degree from there is meaningless.
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    Personally, I agree with Mr Roboto and add that taking a HND may also be advisable
    or take an intensive year.

    It may even be in your interest , you can afford to take an intensive year with - Mander Portman Woodward - specialists at intensive A level retake years.

    http://www.mpw.co.uk/lon/a-level.asp?scW=1280
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    Roehampton!

    I think.
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    University of bedfordshire ftw!

    People on here are way too snobby for their own good lol. DDD doesn't mean you're thick at all.
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    (Original post by LurkerintheDark)
    I agree with the emerging (and sensible, thank christ) consensus. Anything below CCC (which is fairly poor in itself, ain't it?) is simply not good enough for degree-level study. I've written many long posts on this topic, but the usual suspects persist in reeling off their pathertic, wooly-soft and demonstrably fallible arguments. I'll conclude simply by saying that if anybody is currently in University who had anything below CCC at A-Level, they don't deserve to be there. Period.
    Ok. I got CDEd at A-Level. Far below what I'm capable of, mainly because my relationship with my family was falling apart thanks to my dad remarrying. I rushed into a HND/Degree programme after completing my A-Levels and I was doing well until things got really bad at home and I began treatment for depression. I failed my first year on the 2nd semester coursework, of which most of it was late and the rest I didn't even complete.

    I dropped out and after months of trying, got a part time Christmas job for Currys, working minimum wage. My contract was extended to a permanent one and after a year working part time for them, I got a full time job with RICS, working in their customer service department. I moved out of my dad's house, sorted my life out and paid off my debts.

    I'm now back at uni, 4 years later (albeit not a great one, but the unis that offer my course aren't exactly "Red Brick" ) and at the moment, I'm on course for a First. I also stand to become quite well off when I leave, too. Under your little "One size fits all" arrangement, I would be denied the education I deserve and the career I want. So quit bashing all the people with less than perfect A-Levels. It's not like you're going to be affected by us with your red brick degree.
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    So quit bashing all the people with less than perfect A-Levels. It's not like you're going to be affected by us with your red brick degree.
    Well said. That point about students underachieving is one I get tired of making.

    Every year people will achieve modest grades (say CCD-DDD) at A-level. It doesn't mean that, in all cases, they are "thick" but were, instead, dealt a rough deal. Students may have personal problems, health problems, undiagnosed learning difficulties or may come from a poor school.

    It's quite sickening that people are so quick to judge people they don't even know just because of a few letters.
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    don't even bother going to uni get a job instead
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    my dad got into sunderland (when it was a poly) with one E
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    (Original post by LurkerintheDark)
    I agree with the emerging (and sensible, thank christ) consensus. Anything below CCC (which is fairly poor in itself, ain't it?) is simply not good enough for degree-level study. I've written many long posts on this topic, but the usual suspects persist in reeling off their pathertic, wooly-soft and demonstrably fallible arguments. I'll conclude simply by saying that if anybody is currently in University who had anything below CCC at A-Level, they don't deserve to be there. Period.
    Nonsense, it's attitudes like this which lead to class divides.
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    Thames South Bank only wants two A-level passes (i.e. EE) to get onto most of it's courses.
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    try london met
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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    Ok. I got CDEd at A-Level. Far below what I'm capable of, mainly because my relationship with my family was falling apart thanks to my dad remarrying. I rushed into a HND/Degree programme after completing my A-Levels and I was doing well until things got really bad at home and I began treatment for depression. I failed my first year on the 2nd semester coursework, of which most of it was late and the rest I didn't even complete.

    I dropped out and after months of trying, got a part time Christmas job for Currys, working minimum wage. My contract was extended to a permanent one and after a year working part time for them, I got a full time job with RICS, working in their customer service department. I moved out of my dad's house, sorted my life out and paid off my debts.

    I'm now back at uni, 4 years later (albeit not a great one, but the unis that offer my course aren't exactly "Red Brick" ) and at the moment, I'm on course for a First. I also stand to become quite well off when I leave, too. Under your little "One size fits all" arrangement, I would be denied the education I deserve and the career I want. So quit bashing all the people with less than perfect A-Levels. It's not like you're going to be affected by us with your red brick degree.
    Boo-hoo. With a story like that mate, go apply for X-Factor.
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    I did As levels and I got U's, I then went and did a BTEC Nat Cert instead and got Double Distinction (equivalent to two A's). I got into uni, passed my first year and im now on my 2nd year.

    Personally, if your willing to buck up your ideas and put the effort in then I can't see why you couldn't go to Uni . . . .:dontknow:, unless im just thinking completely and utterly differently to everyone else in here? . . . .
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    I only got DDE in my A-levels because I hated everything about the school I went to for the last year. As a result I didn't try particularly hard and considered withdrawing my UCAS application. I missed my offer by 40 points and have still got a place for next year on a degree course that I am looking forward to and I fully intend to work a lot harder as I want a decent degree.
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    Doesn't a college in Cambridge still give out EE offers?

    Just have to get high predictions and an excuse not to have done (almost) any modules the first year
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    (Original post by kirsty142)
    I only got DDE in my A-levels because I hated everything about the school I went to for the last year. As a result I didn't try particularly hard and considered withdrawing my UCAS application. I missed my offer by 40 points and have still got a place for next year on a degree course that I am looking forward to and I fully intend to work a lot harder as I want a decent degree.
    that's still no excuse for DDE, i hated one of mine and got an A.....
 
 
 
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