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Struggling to figure out what course to do for uni

hi. i am in year 13 studying psych, bio, and chem and I was initially going to apply for medicine however I didn't and I'm taking a gap year rn. its bc I don't know if I really want to do medicine - I don't know what I really what to do and medicine is only bc that's the only career my dad talks abt so I didn't really get to choose. trying to find other courses made me realize that maths is really essential and I'm quite sad I didn't pick it, however, I'm not very good at maths lol. ive been looking into chemical engineering but some unis need maths and now I'm looking into natural sciences rn and some need maths aswell. Would it be worth it to do a maths a level rn? I'm a bit torn between all these choices cuz medicine is really broad that's why I like it, however ive spoken to doctors and so any people regret doing medicine- I'm taking a gap year however I don't know what to do during it. ive taken loads of quizzes but it isnt really working. i really don't know what to do - any advice?
Original post by Abys05
hi. i am in year 13 studying psych, bio, and chem and I was initially going to apply for medicine however I didn't and I'm taking a gap year rn. its bc I don't know if I really want to do medicine - I don't know what I really what to do and medicine is only bc that's the only career my dad talks abt so I didn't really get to choose. trying to find other courses made me realize that maths is really essential and I'm quite sad I didn't pick it, however, I'm not very good at maths lol. ive been looking into chemical engineering but some unis need maths and now I'm looking into natural sciences rn and some need maths aswell. Would it be worth it to do a maths a level rn? I'm a bit torn between all these choices cuz medicine is really broad that's why I like it, however ive spoken to doctors and so any people regret doing medicine- I'm taking a gap year however I don't know what to do during it. ive taken loads of quizzes but it isnt really working. i really don't know what to do - any advice?


Maths is probably the most widely requested required subject, with biology being a close second.

If you're adamant in doing an engineering degree, it's worth doing the A Level.

You will have to take the exams as a private candidate (£250 if apply early), but it would depend on how you go about it.
If you want to take a course on it, you would want to go to an online college website and pick a course that is for the specific exam body that you want to do your A Level with (AQA and EdExcel being the most popular). Do not go and pick the course based on the reputation of the college; pick the course based on the reputation of the tutor who you will get; not all tutors are as good as the other. You can find these online course through googling terms such as "A Level online maths course" (make sure the course is not for iA Levels - these are A Levels for international exam boards, so you would be learning some of the wrong material). There should be roughly 20 courses available in the UK. Cost of the suitable courses can range from £395 to £800.
If you want to self study, just pick the textbook relevant to the exam board that you're studying under and study away. Textbooks can cost £50 brand new.
Irrespective of which route you want to take, you will want to pick a recommended calculator (I picked both and I don't regret it; one for graphs, the other for quick calculations). The calculators can cost £30 or £120, and I recommend buying them brand new (take it from experience). I would also recommend exam practice books and revision guides specific for your exam board (second hand ones can cost just below £10). However, I would recommend doing as many past exam papers as you can find, irrespective of which exam board they are for (you can find the past papers on various websites). YouTube videos on specific questions and how to tackle certain topics is also very advisable, if your course doesn't recommend them enough.

The aim of the game is to complete all the material by February at the latest, and then do as many exam practice papers as you can until your exams. (I did 15-20 for my A Level; it was not easy.) It is said that you can go through the material for an A Level in 300 or so hours. However, I would double that so you have 300 hours to go through the material and another 300 for revision.

Bear in mind, if you can't do A Level maths or don't enjoy it, you are very unlikely to enjoy an engineering, physics, maths, actuarial science, economics, or computer science degree.

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