The Mathematics G100 course Watch

Poll: Which uni in the UK has the strongest maths department outside Oxbridge?
Imperial (11)
42.31%
Warwick (11)
42.31%
Other (mention in thread) (4)
15.38%
This discussion is closed.
angelafleming
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#81
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#81
Anyway, I applied to University of Leicester as my fifth choice.

Hopefully I won't get rejected outright like by Cambridge!
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Magical Moogles
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#82
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I'm not an expert, but I think I can make some contribution to this thread.

I'm going to be the oddball and vote for "Other", and I'll explain myself.

Reading your posts, you seem to focused more on ranks and whatnot, rather than the university itself. Firstly, league tables are NOT a good way of choosing a university. Most of the tables are created from irrelevant and out-of-date information. How about starting by visiting the universities and seeing what it is like? You can visit the Maths department, and get a feel of what it will be like if you were a Warwick/Imperial student.

You are interested in both Imperial and Warwick, which academically they are both said to be strong, but what about the environment? As far as I am aware, warwick and Imperial are two completly different universities in two completly different locations. Surely if you researched both appropriately, you would find some sort of preference...

As far as Maths goes, I dont think the course structure changes much. The BSc is pretty general, and they will possibly allow you to experiment a little with the modules. Most of the time you will find the course structure a little different from university to university, and the university might make modules 'core' because they are good at teaching it.

The biggest difference is not what they teach, but how. Some universities might go straight in the deep-end, whereas other may be more conservative. Again, this is something you need to research.

I decided to vote for 'Other' because I dont think you've really thought about this seriously (I could be wrong). Open days are a blessing, and I highly recommend you going to a few. I've been to plenty of universities that although they do not rank highly in tables, they just feel 'right'.

It may sound corny, but I do think there is a university that suits everyone. I wish you good luck deciding what university that is, as its very important you get it right, as your going to be spending the next 3 years of your life there.

Magical Moogles

-----------------------

If I had to decide between Warwick or Imperial, I would say Warwick. The campus is pretty, and they have a good reputation. I havent actually visited either, so Imperial may be nice as well. This is 'my' preference, and its not based on league tables...
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angelafleming
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#83
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#83
(Original post by Magical Moogles)
I'm not an expert, but I think I can make some contribution to this thread.

I'm going to be the oddball and vote for "Other", and I'll explain myself.

Reading your posts, you seem to focused more on ranks and whatnot, rather than the university itself. Firstly, league tables are NOT a good way of choosing a university. Most of the tables are created from irrelevant and out-of-date information. How about starting by visiting the universities and seeing what it is like? You can visit the Maths department, and get a feel of what it will be like if you were a Warwick/Imperial student.

You are interested in both Imperial and Warwick, which academically they are both said to be strong, but what about the environment? As far as I am aware, warwick and Imperial are two completly different universities in two completly different locations. Surely if you researched both appropriately, you would find some sort of preference...

As far as Maths goes, I dont think the course structure changes much. The BSc is pretty general, and they will possibly allow you to experiment a little with the modules. Most of the time you will find the course structure a little different from university to university, and the university might make modules 'core' because they are good at teaching it.

The biggest difference is not what they teach, but how. Some universities might go straight in the deep-end, whereas other may be more conservative. Again, this is something you need to research.

I decided to vote for 'Other' because I dont think you've really thought about this seriously (I could be wrong). Open days are a blessing, and I highly recommend you going to a few. I've been to plenty of universities that although they do not rank highly in tables, they just feel 'right'.

It may sound corny, but I do think there is a university that suits everyone. I wish you good luck deciding what university that is, as its very important you get it right, as your going to be spending the next 3 years of your life there.

Magical Moogles

-----------------------

If I had to decide between Warwick or Imperial, I would say Warwick. The campus is pretty, and they have a good reputation. I havent actually visited either, so Imperial may be nice as well. This is 'my' preference, and its not based on league tables...
Thanks for your thoughtful post, the best on this thread so far!
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silent ninja
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#84
(Original post by Swayum)
Ur, what? Warwick's first year gives you 25% choice in your modules in which you can do courses outside of mathematics if you want (and to give an extreme example, even history, as pointed out in an open day). I'm fairly certain this is nothing like Cambridge. And you get more and more choice as you progress.
Yeah, it was founded on that principle: to provide a tutorial type system combined with American-style module choice. In reality, the modules are more limited than appear as you have to take certain modules for future modules and so on. The key point is that a keen student can follow his/her interests and take more maths options to suit, but the core maths modules cover a lot of material and take up the vast majority of your time.
Everyone I know is taking maths/economics/physics options. Outside options, apart from languages, are not really that common-- even if you do take them the course does make sure that overall you do a sufficient amount of maths i.e you can't escape maths, they will bust your balls with it lol

(Btw I dont do maths but there is a decent amount of overlap in the first year and I know a few maths students).
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SimonM
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#85
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(Original post by angelafleming)
Cambridge: The reason for this decision is that competition in your subject was particularly fierce this year (we in fact had an all-time record number of applications) and your ranking on paper was not high enough for you to be included on our shortlist for interview. A final decision on your application will be made in late December/early January.

Any advice on what I should do?
You would have to be particularly poor on paper to not get an interview, so claiming to be better than top A level students is unlikely to be true.

Advice: Imperial/UCL/Warwick/The US
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angelafleming
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#86
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#86
(Original post by SimonM)
You would have to be particularly poor on paper to not get an interview, so claiming to be better than top A level students is unlikely to be true.
I really am insulted by your post!

The only "flaw" in my application was not having A levels. (Doing A levels or not has no bearing on a person's intelligence, trust me.) Apart from that, I had top grades in all my exams, participated in the national maths olympiad twice (mentioned it in my PS) and had an excellent reference (I even got to see it as I was applying as an individual candidate).

And I am better than most top A level students. You know that just as well as I do.
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SimonM
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#87
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#87
(Original post by angelafleming)
The only "flaw" in my application was not having A levels. (Doing A levels or not has no bearing on a person's intelligence, trust me.) Apart from that, I had top grades in all my exams, participated in the national maths olympiad twice (mentioned it in my PS) and had an excellent reference (I even got to see it as I was applying as an individual candidate).
I'm not going to try and write a thesis on why you got rejected but here are a few ideas.

The exams you took weren't sufficient: Cambridge have told you that as you know (and you wouldn't have to take A levels, there is also IB as an option)
Participating in the NMO is not really an achievement: Anyone can participate, doing well is something different
Excellent reference: So will everyone else

Also:
You are applying over a year since leaving school, Cambridge aren't fond of this sort of thing
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angelafleming
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#88
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#88
(Original post by SimonM)
I'm not going to try and write a thesis on why you got rejected but here are a few ideas.

The exams you took weren't sufficient: Cambridge have told you that as you know (and you wouldn't have to take A levels, there is also IB as an option)
Participating in the NMO is not really an achievement: Anyone can participate, doing well is something different
Excellent reference: So will everyone else

Also:
You are applying over a year since leaving school, Cambridge aren't fond of this sort of thing
I had promised to write the A levels in June 2009.
For your information, only RMO awardees are allowed to write the INMO.
Excellent reference: I read my reference; everyone else wouldn't have read theirs.

And about applying in my gap year, I really had no choice as I didn't like my previous uni.
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Simplicity
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Excellent reference: I read my reference; everyone else wouldn't have read theirs.
I read mine, about half the students in the forum read there reference.

And about applying in my gap year, I really had no choice as I didn't like my previous uni.
Thats proberly why you got rejected.

To be brutally honest, Cambridge is proberly not racist, espically the people who do maths, as Ramanujan went to Cambridge.

participated in the national maths olympiad twice (mentioned it in my PS)
Did you get a award or get to the finals?
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angelafleming
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#90
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(Original post by Simplicity)
I read mine, about half the students in the forum read there reference.


Thats proberly why you got rejected.

To be brutally honest, Cambridge is proberly not racist, espically the people who do maths, as Ramanujan went to Cambridge.


Did you get a award or get to the finals?
Is that a new word or something?
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Simplicity
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#91
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#91
Is that a new word or something?
I think thats the reason you got rejected from Cambridge.
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Kolya
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#92
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#92
(Original post by SimonM)
I'm not going to try and write a thesis on why you got rejected but here are a few ideas.

The exams you took weren't sufficient: Cambridge have told you that as you know (and you wouldn't have to take A levels, there is also IB as an option)
Participating in the NMO is not really an achievement: Anyone can participate, doing well is something different
Excellent reference: So will everyone else

Also:
You are applying over a year since leaving school, Cambridge aren't fond of this sort of thing
Or, simply, the find-and-replace feedback does have some truth to it: competition for international students is extremely fierce. I don't think it is a case of competence; I think it is a case of standing out. With such a huge pool of international applicants to choose from, I would suspect it is a case of picking out those they especially want, rather than rejecting those who have flaws. I think that is a simple, unfortunate fact for an international applicant.
angelafleming
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#93
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(Original post by Simplicity)
I think thats the reason you got rejected from Cambridge.
For correcting other people's spelling? Cambridge does that often, I've heard!
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angelafleming
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#94
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(Original post by Barny)
What do you want from your degree/time at University? Where do your interests lie?

I can tell you, if you look beyond subjective "brand quality" and University rankings, there is a great deal of choice for you.

As far as brands go, in the UK, it's simple. Cambridge is top, roughly on par with Oxford. After that, there isn't a discernible difference in quality between the next 15 Universities, and you should choose them based on what you're interested in rather than what some people on TSR deem to be the "best" Universities.

For example, do you like pure mathematics, or applied? Warwicks Maths course is exceptionally Pure orientated, where as Imperial has a much stronger applied department and module choices/teaching reflects that. Do you want a broad Maths education or do you want significant choice from the outset? Some Universities won't let you make any module choices for the first two years, so you could spend a significant amount of time studying for modules you hate. I know York is very much like that where as Nottingham is the opposite.

The point is that it's your choice, it's your degree and your interests so you need to do some research rather than blindly following league tables/hear say.
The reason I originally joined "The Student Room" was to get info about Cambridge application. Now that I've been rejected, I don't intend to study in the UK anymore and will probably leave TSR for good.

Anyway, I'd be glad if someone could suggest a few decent US colleges where I'll be sure of getting in. My SAT scores are:
SAT I: 2000 (planning to retake on Dec 4, 2009)
SAT II: 2370
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River85
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#95
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(Original post by angelafleming)
The reason I originally joined "The Student Room" was to get info about Cambridge application. Now that I've been rejected, I don't intend to study in the UK anymore and will probably leave TSR for good.

Anyway, I'd be glad if someone could suggest a few decent US colleges where I'll be sure of getting in. My SAT scores are:
SAT I: 2000 (planning to retake on Dec 4, 2009)
SAT II: 2370
So this thread isn't relevant or useful anymore?

If you want to know about US study then it's best to go to the specialist subforum and ask there (not here)

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9#post15398159
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angelafleming
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#96
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#96
(Original post by River85)
So this thread isn't relevant or useful anymore?

If you want to know about US study then it's best to go to the specialist subforum and ask there (not here)

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...9#post15398159
Or maybe I should return to (Edited by moderator - Please don't link to other forums)

Anyway TSR has become obsolete as far as I'm concerned.
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MrShifty
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#97
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Is that a dummy I see on the floor? Who spat that out?
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River85
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#98
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Well, as this thread is now obsolete and much of it has been spam/bickering (and I think it'll only get worse) I'm closing it.

I wish you the best of luck in your decision and uni life.
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