The Student Room Group

A-level

what can you do in the future with economics maths biology chemistry
a-level?
Original post by AmyDarcy001
what can you do in the future with economics maths biology chemistry
a-level?

This is a one of those very open ended questions.

What do you want to do?

If you're asking what degrees you can do with your A Levels, you can do anything in life sciences (which can lead to jobs with the NHS/healthcare or life science research), economics (not because of the economics A Level), financial mathematics/acuarial science, maths, civil engineering, computer science and software engineering, geology, chemistry, chemical engineering. You can then pick degrees that accept any A Level subjects: anything from business school (excluding financial mathematics), archaeology, agriculture, anthropology, architecture, some art and design degrees, sociology and criminology, education, game design, some geography degrees, hospitality, journalism, law, media, philosophy, politics, social work, sports, theology.

In terms of careers, only a handful of jobs would ever need degrees or come close to using degrees. From your list, anything related to the NHS would likely require a degree, as well as education, architecture, and anything related to research. Areas where the degrees would be useful in industry include law, economics, engineering. You can also then apply for any work that doesn't require degrees (which can include a very long list of jobs).

Do note, for any single role in the UK health sector, you would very likely require specific degrees approved by very specific bodies in order to be eligible for the role you want. Not all top universities will provide degrees that would meet these specific requirements.

It would also depend on the regulations in your country that would determine what you would need or don't need in order to get specific roles. In the UK, we're relaxed about a number of areas as mentioned above which means you're exposed to a wide array of opportunities, even if you ultimately decide not to get a degree.

If you're based in the UK and want to investigate such roles, I recommend looking at National Careers Service (https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers) or Career Pilot (https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/sectors) for specific information about particular job profiles.

If you have even an inkling of some idea of what you want to do professionally, I might be able to pinpoint some of the information you would need should you want.
Original post by MindMax2000
This is a one of those very open ended questions.

What do you want to do?

If you're asking what degrees you can do with your A Levels, you can do anything in life sciences (which can lead to jobs with the NHS/healthcare or life science research), economics (not because of the economics A Level), financial mathematics/acuarial science, maths, civil engineering, computer science and software engineering, geology, chemistry, chemical engineering. You can then pick degrees that accept any A Level subjects: anything from business school (excluding financial mathematics), archaeology, agriculture, anthropology, architecture, some art and design degrees, sociology and criminology, education, game design, some geography degrees, hospitality, journalism, law, media, philosophy, politics, social work, sports, theology.

In terms of careers, only a handful of jobs would ever need degrees or come close to using degrees. From your list, anything related to the NHS would likely require a degree, as well as education, architecture, and anything related to research. Areas where the degrees would be useful in industry include law, economics, engineering. You can also then apply for any work that doesn't require degrees (which can include a very long list of jobs).

Do note, for any single role in the UK health sector, you would very likely require specific degrees approved by very specific bodies in order to be eligible for the role you want. Not all top universities will provide degrees that would meet these specific requirements.

It would also depend on the regulations in your country that would determine what you would need or don't need in order to get specific roles. In the UK, we're relaxed about a number of areas as mentioned above which means you're exposed to a wide array of opportunities, even if you ultimately decide not to get a degree.

If you're based in the UK and want to investigate such roles, I recommend looking at National Careers Service (https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers) or Career Pilot (https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/sectors) for specific information about particular job profiles.

If you have even an inkling of some idea of what you want to do professionally, I might be able to pinpoint some of the information you would need should you want.

I agree
Original post by MindMax2000
This is a one of those very open ended questions.

What do you want to do?

If you're asking what degrees you can do with your A Levels, you can do anything in life sciences (which can lead to jobs with the NHS/healthcare or life science research), economics (not because of the economics A Level), financial mathematics/acuarial science, maths, civil engineering, computer science and software engineering, geology, chemistry, chemical engineering. You can then pick degrees that accept any A Level subjects: anything from business school (excluding financial mathematics), archaeology, agriculture, anthropology, architecture, some art and design degrees, sociology and criminology, education, game design, some geography degrees, hospitality, journalism, law, media, philosophy, politics, social work, sports, theology.

In terms of careers, only a handful of jobs would ever need degrees or come close to using degrees. From your list, anything related to the NHS would likely require a degree, as well as education, architecture, and anything related to research. Areas where the degrees would be useful in industry include law, economics, engineering. You can also then apply for any work that doesn't require degrees (which can include a very long list of jobs).

Do note, for any single role in the UK health sector, you would very likely require specific degrees approved by very specific bodies in order to be eligible for the role you want. Not all top universities will provide degrees that would meet these specific requirements.

It would also depend on the regulations in your country that would determine what you would need or don't need in order to get specific roles. In the UK, we're relaxed about a number of areas as mentioned above which means you're exposed to a wide array of opportunities, even if you ultimately decide not to get a degree.

If you're based in the UK and want to investigate such roles, I recommend looking at National Careers Service (https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers) or Career Pilot (https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/sectors) for specific information about particular job profiles.

If you have even an inkling of some idea of what you want to do professionally, I might be able to pinpoint some of the information you would need should you want.


professionally I feel like doing biomedical data scientist or like something to do with data and science or like being a cyber security analyst what i want to do always changes which makes it so difficult to choose but I do know that I enjoy analysing data of something for like science or computing
Original post by AmyDarcy001
what can you do in the future with economics maths biology chemistry
a-level?


Try plugging your A levels into this:

https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/a-level-explorer

and then do the quiz on here:

https://www.prospects.ac.uk/
Original post by AmyDarcy001
professionally I feel like doing biomedical data scientist or like something to do with data and science or like being a cyber security analyst what i want to do always changes which makes it so difficult to choose but I do know that I enjoy analysing data of something for like science or computing


Whilst cyber security analyst roles do not require specific qualifications, you can do professional qualifications that have no entry requirements (and are cheap) See the following:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/cyber-security-analyst
https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/information/ncsc-certified-degrees#section_5 (in case you want to do a postgrad after a biology related undergrad)
https://www.itgovernance.co.uk/blog/what-are-the-best-qualifications-for-a-career-in-cyber-security (personally, I would just go straight into CompTIA)
https://hackr.io/blog/best-cybersecurity-certification
https://www.springboard.com/blog/cybersecurity/cybersecurity-certifications/
https://uk.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/security-certifications
https://firebrand.training/uk/blog/10-best-cybersecurity-certifications

Biomedical data science sounds like bioinformatics, which is a master's degree you can go into with a biological science (or more of a computer science/maths/engineering/physics) degree at bachelor's level (depending on the entry requirements). You might want to consider a PhD afterwards since the applications are mostly academic, but there are some roles that would accept you at bachelor's level in the NHS:
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/healthcare-science/roles-healthcare-science/clinical-bioinformatics/clinical-bioinformatics-genomics
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/explore-roles/health-informatics/health-informatics/roles-health-informatics/roles-health-informatics/clinical-informatics/clinical
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/healthcare-science/roles-healthcare-science/clinical-bioinformatics/clinical-bioinformatics-health-informatics
https://www.glassdoor.co.uk/Career/bioinformatics-scientist-career_KO0,24.htm

You have the A Level to do a data science degree should you wish (A Level Maths), but it's unlikely that a degree would get you into the space in industry. See the following:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG__zV5t8K0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhiw8ftAFZk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-omNhEjl1xQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVIIxkofDQg
https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/certifications/power-bi-data-analyst-associate/
Unless you intend to go into academia, you may have issues doing anything in data science. Other people's opinions may differ though.
Should you wish to get a degree that would allow you to go into data science, you can do one at master's level e.g.:
https://www.coventry.ac.uk/course-structure/pg/eec/data-science-msc/#ct-section4
https://aru.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applied-data-science#entry_requirements
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/courses/data-science-msc
https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/masters-degrees/a-z/data-science/
As you would expect, top end university courses in data science would ask for an undergrad in a quantiative subject e.g. computer science, engineering, mathematics, physics, etc.

As mentioned above, a degree in computer science or IT won't help get jobs in tech in industry (you will need it if you want to do research in academia though). I don't know which specific role you want in IT, so I would recommend you go through the following:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-categories/computing-technology-and-digital
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/data-network/job-profiles
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/software-systems/job-profiles

Should you want to go into computer science research, there are a number of master degrees that would accept an undergraduate in any subject so long you have a high enough grade. See the following as examples:
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught-degrees/computer-science-msc
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/taught/computer-science/computer-science.aspx#EntryRequirementsTab
https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/pg/computing/computing/
There are computer science master's degrees that build on existing computer science undergrad knowledge. Unless you have an undergrad in computer science, you won't be eligible for these degrees.

If you want to be as broad as you want and have a range of options as backup, I would get an undergrad in biomedical science or similiar then remain open to a variety of master's in:

bioinformatics

computer science (if you want to go into computer science or bioinformatic research)

data science (if you want to go into bioinfomatics or data science research)

cybersecurity (not necessary to go into cybersecurity, but available if you want)


Should you wish to do a more mathematical undergrad related to biology (essentially just a maths degree with a biology context), you can do an undergrad in mathematical biology, but only a handful of universities offer it in the country:
https://www.dundee.ac.uk/undergraduate/mathematical-biology-bsc/entry-requirements
https://www.york.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/bsc-mathematical-bioscience/#entry
https://www.exeter.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/mathematics/mathsmsci-biology/#entry-requirements
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/subjects/biology/biology-bsc/biology-and-mathematics-joint/ (this is a joint degree, so you get equal amounts of maths and biology)
https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/undergraduatecourses/biologyandmathematics/#entry (this is a joint degree, so you get equal amounts of maths and biology)
The above degrees would allow you to go into the same master's degrees in the 4 areas mentioned above.
Original post by MindMax2000
Whilst cyber security analyst roles do not require specific qualifications, you can do professional qualifications that have no entry requirements (and are cheap) See the following:
https://www.prospects.ac.uk/job-profiles/cyber-security-analyst
https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/information/ncsc-certified-degrees#section_5 (in case you want to do a postgrad after a biology related undergrad)
https://www.itgovernance.co.uk/blog/what-are-the-best-qualifications-for-a-career-in-cyber-security (personally, I would just go straight into CompTIA)
https://hackr.io/blog/best-cybersecurity-certification
https://www.springboard.com/blog/cybersecurity/cybersecurity-certifications/
https://uk.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/security-certifications
https://firebrand.training/uk/blog/10-best-cybersecurity-certifications

Biomedical data science sounds like bioinformatics, which is a master's degree you can go into with a biological science (or more of a computer science/maths/engineering/physics) degree at bachelor's level (depending on the entry requirements). You might want to consider a PhD afterwards since the applications are mostly academic, but there are some roles that would accept you at bachelor's level in the NHS:
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/healthcare-science/roles-healthcare-science/clinical-bioinformatics/clinical-bioinformatics-genomics
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/explore-roles/health-informatics/health-informatics/roles-health-informatics/roles-health-informatics/clinical-informatics/clinical
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/healthcare-science/roles-healthcare-science/clinical-bioinformatics/clinical-bioinformatics-health-informatics
https://www.glassdoor.co.uk/Career/bioinformatics-scientist-career_KO0,24.htm

You have the A Level to do a data science degree should you wish (A Level Maths), but it's unlikely that a degree would get you into the space in industry. See the following:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG__zV5t8K0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhiw8ftAFZk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-omNhEjl1xQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aVIIxkofDQg
https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/certifications/power-bi-data-analyst-associate/
Unless you intend to go into academia, you may have issues doing anything in data science. Other people's opinions may differ though.
Should you wish to get a degree that would allow you to go into data science, you can do one at master's level e.g.:
https://www.coventry.ac.uk/course-structure/pg/eec/data-science-msc/#ct-section4
https://aru.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applied-data-science#entry_requirements
https://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/courses/data-science-msc
https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/masters-degrees/a-z/data-science/
As you would expect, top end university courses in data science would ask for an undergrad in a quantiative subject e.g. computer science, engineering, mathematics, physics, etc.

As mentioned above, a degree in computer science or IT won't help get jobs in tech in industry (you will need it if you want to do research in academia though). I don't know which specific role you want in IT, so I would recommend you go through the following:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-categories/computing-technology-and-digital
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/data-network/job-profiles
https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/software-systems/job-profiles

Should you want to go into computer science research, there are a number of master degrees that would accept an undergraduate in any subject so long you have a high enough grade. See the following as examples:
https://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught-degrees/computer-science-msc
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/taught/computer-science/computer-science.aspx#EntryRequirementsTab
https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/pg/computing/computing/
There are computer science master's degrees that build on existing computer science undergrad knowledge. Unless you have an undergrad in computer science, you won't be eligible for these degrees.

If you want to be as broad as you want and have a range of options as backup, I would get an undergrad in biomedical science or similiar then remain open to a variety of master's in:

bioinformatics

computer science (if you want to go into computer science or bioinformatic research)

data science (if you want to go into bioinfomatics or data science research)

cybersecurity (not necessary to go into cybersecurity, but available if you want)


Should you wish to do a more mathematical undergrad related to biology (essentially just a maths degree with a biology context), you can do an undergrad in mathematical biology, but only a handful of universities offer it in the country:
https://www.dundee.ac.uk/undergraduate/mathematical-biology-bsc/entry-requirements
https://www.york.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/bsc-mathematical-bioscience/#entry
https://www.exeter.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/mathematics/mathsmsci-biology/#entry-requirements
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/subjects/biology/biology-bsc/biology-and-mathematics-joint/ (this is a joint degree, so you get equal amounts of maths and biology)
https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/undergraduatecourses/biologyandmathematics/#entry (this is a joint degree, so you get equal amounts of maths and biology)
The above degrees would allow you to go into the same master's degrees in the 4 areas mentioned above.

Very comprehensive, well thought-out answer. What an asset to TSR you are :smile:
Original post by Reality Check
Very comprehensive, well thought-out answer. What an asset to TSR you are :smile:


Thanks
Original post by AmyDarcy001
what can you do in the future with economics maths biology chemistry
a-level?

Heya!
That's exactly the same a-levels I did :h: Just to give you an idea of what you can do, I did a science degree which focused on chemical analysis (though you are welcome to do an economics/finance degree too as you have maths!) and now I'm doing science mixed with business masters as I want to go into the business side of the pharmaceutical industry (having done some economics really helped out!). I would recommend checking out Prospects if you are unsure what you want to do. There are plenty of options for you! You can also check out Unicompare to see what unis and what courses are there!

I hope this helps!
Milena G.
UCL PFE
Study Mind

Quick Reply

Latest