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Primary Education with QTS University Interview

Hi everyone,

I have my interviews coming up this week and next week for Primary Education with QTS.

I just wondered if anyone who has had one of these interviews have any advice or input on what I should expect?

I've been told it's a group interview where you had to pick one of the 5 options to present, I chose an educational issue (as that's what i have to do for another interview) and the issue I've chosen is the SEND Crisis. I plan to talk about the rapid increase in pupils requiring SEND support and the lack of funding, awareness and support etc.

I'm just super nervous so any advice or tips would really help!!
Good luck with your interview :smile:I have my first one next week and another next month.Choosing SEND sounds really good and those points are defo good.Have you been able to do a mock interview with any of the staff at your sixth form/school/college? As this may help you. What universities are you applying for?For one of mine it is a group interview - questions like and then a short 4 minute presentation on a children's book.
Original post by chloesealeyy
Hi everyone,

I have my interviews coming up this week and next week for Primary Education with QTS.

I just wondered if anyone who has had one of these interviews have any advice or input on what I should expect?

I've been told it's a group interview where you had to pick one of the 5 options to present, I chose an educational issue (as that's what i have to do for another interview) and the issue I've chosen is the SEND Crisis. I plan to talk about the rapid increase in pupils requiring SEND support and the lack of funding, awareness and support etc.

I'm just super nervous so any advice or tips would really help!!

Hello,

I finished my three years in Prim Ed this year and I am now a teacher! Firstly, I would like to say you're making a great decision and you will have a brilliant time.

The best tip I can give you is be yourself and let your passion for teaching show. I was so nervous but I found that the more I spoke about the topic, the easier it was. It was like when I had my teaching interview and I was so nervous until I started the teaching section and it became natural.
The interviewers will most likely be the lecturers and they're not looking for an expert, they're looking for someone who is excited to teach, is open to learning and has a passion. If you have experience in a school, that is great and you should definitely draw on that whenever possible. If not, real life applications to anything you can are brilliant too. But above all, let your passion show!

I would also recommend that you do a bit of reading around current primary education topics. Even just turning education news alerts on your news app can have a big impact. I found I would spend a couple of minutes a day keeping in touch because it has caught my attention through my phone. This will help you get involved with the group discussion and show a proactive mindset.
You could also see if there are any relevant articles around the lack of support. You could print them and bring them along, it's not like you need to memorise the content.

I hope this helps and I wish you the best of luck!
Lydia :smile:
Original post by Lydia Taylor (YSJU Student Ambassador)
Hello,

I finished my three years in Prim Ed this year and I am now a teacher! Firstly, I would like to say you're making a great decision and you will have a brilliant time.

The best tip I can give you is be yourself and let your passion for teaching show. I was so nervous but I found that the more I spoke about the topic, the easier it was. It was like when I had my teaching interview and I was so nervous until I started the teaching section and it became natural.
The interviewers will most likely be the lecturers and they're not looking for an expert, they're looking for someone who is excited to teach, is open to learning and has a passion. If you have experience in a school, that is great and you should definitely draw on that whenever possible. If not, real life applications to anything you can are brilliant too. But above all, let your passion show!

I would also recommend that you do a bit of reading around current primary education topics. Even just turning education news alerts on your news app can have a big impact. I found I would spend a couple of minutes a day keeping in touch because it has caught my attention through my phone. This will help you get involved with the group discussion and show a proactive mindset.
You could also see if there are any relevant articles around the lack of support. You could print them and bring them along, it's not like you need to memorise the content.

I hope this helps and I wish you the best of luck!
Lydia :smile:

Well Done for getting your first teaching job :smile:
I noticed you went to York St John (from profile picture and name) and I have applied there and am awaiting on hearing if I got a interview. Did you enjoy it there? How did you find it? Were your placements fairly nearby?
Do many universities ask about current primary education topics/issues then?
Original post by polzeath1234
Well Done for getting your first teaching job :smile:
I noticed you went to York St John (from profile picture and name) and I have applied there and am awaiting on hearing if I got a interview. Did you enjoy it there? How did you find it? Were your placements fairly nearby?
Do many universities ask about current primary education topics/issues then?

Hello,

That's great to hear that you applied to us. I hope it has all gone well for you!

I loved my time at YSJ. It is a smaller campus which makes such a community feel as you always have a mutual friend with someone. However, we still have all the facilities of a big campus such as a 24 hour library and a range of support teams. All the lecturers knew the whole cohort by name, knew if we had a particular specialism we wanted to pursue but most importantly always were there to chat if we needed to.

I felt the course content was great, we covered core curriculum, wider curriculum, wider skills (a choice of things like languages, sports or first aid to give us a CV boost), education theory, behaviour management, assessment, EYFS, other educational settings and an elective module for which I chose creativity in the curriculum. I am sure there is more I have left out. We had average of 20 hour weeks so its a lot of work but it prepared me well for teaching and I draw on my experience daily.
The course has no exams but instead relies on essays, portfolios, presentations and creative artefacts. The lecturers understand that teachers are very practical people and so wanted to make the course to suit our needs so we can get the best grade possible.

Placements were my favourite part. We did 6 weeks in first year, 8 weeks in second year and 10 weeks in third year. By your last placement, you are essentially the class teacher and only out for PPA and ECT time. You can choose either your home address or university address for them to find a placement nearest to. I was in Leeds in my first year, a school near my home in my second year and York for my third year. They do try their best to place you as close as they can and they cover travel costs which is brilliant! In your first placement they also try to place you with someone else on your course and start as a couple of days before moving onto week blocks as this allows you to settle in and find your feet.

I hope that helps!
Lydia :smile:
Original post by Lydia Taylor (YSJU Student Ambassador)
Hello,

That's great to hear that you applied to us. I hope it has all gone well for you!

I loved my time at YSJ. It is a smaller campus which makes such a community feel as you always have a mutual friend with someone. However, we still have all the facilities of a big campus such as a 24 hour library and a range of support teams. All the lecturers knew the whole cohort by name, knew if we had a particular specialism we wanted to pursue but most importantly always were there to chat if we needed to.

I felt the course content was great, we covered core curriculum, wider curriculum, wider skills (a choice of things like languages, sports or first aid to give us a CV boost), education theory, behaviour management, assessment, EYFS, other educational settings and an elective module for which I chose creativity in the curriculum. I am sure there is more I have left out. We had average of 20 hour weeks so its a lot of work but it prepared me well for teaching and I draw on my experience daily.
The course has no exams but instead relies on essays, portfolios, presentations and creative artefacts. The lecturers understand that teachers are very practical people and so wanted to make the course to suit our needs so we can get the best grade possible.

Placements were my favourite part. We did 6 weeks in first year, 8 weeks in second year and 10 weeks in third year. By your last placement, you are essentially the class teacher and only out for PPA and ECT time. You can choose either your home address or university address for them to find a placement nearest to. I was in Leeds in my first year, a school near my home in my second year and York for my third year. They do try their best to place you as close as they can and they cover travel costs which is brilliant! In your first placement they also try to place you with someone else on your course and start as a couple of days before moving onto week blocks as this allows you to settle in and find your feet.

I hope that helps!
Lydia :smile:

Thank you for all that! It really does help :smile: it sounds brilliant!
Do you remember what sort of things they asked or how the interview worked? As I have been invited to interview but don't know what to expect
or how it is gonna work and the questions etc?
Original post by polzeath1234
Thank you for all that! It really does help :smile: it sounds brilliant!
Do you remember what sort of things they asked or how the interview worked? As I have been invited to interview but don't know what to expect
or how it is gonna work and the questions etc?

Congratulations! That is brilliant news.

So YSJ is the first university to have adopted the same style of interview they use for medicine courses for an education course. That just means you'll be interviewed by about 6 different interviewers in a carousel. There is usually 5 lecturers and a current third year. They all have a different topic or question to discuss with you which gives you a variety of topics to shine in and also 6 different people to impress. If one goes wrong, you know you have another five! However, it is worth saying that all of the lecturers and students are lovely, I felt like they really valued my input when I interviewed.

From what I can remember, questions might be about your experience in a school environment or with children, current educational topics and your ideas about teaching or activities.

My top 3 tips would be:
> Let your passion show, they want to know why you want to teach and what motivates you.
> Do a little reading about some educational topics, even if you just see what are the top headlines in the education section on the news app.
> Be yourself and be confident!
Honestly, the lecturers do not want you to be nervous or trip you up. They are brilliant and will be able to see you passion above all! You're not a teacher yet, they're just looking for someone who has the potential to be.

Lydia :smile:
Original post by Lydia Taylor (YSJU Student Ambassador)
Congratulations! That is brilliant news.

So YSJ is the first university to have adopted the same style of interview they use for medicine courses for an education course. That just means you'll be interviewed by about 6 different interviewers in a carousel. There is usually 5 lecturers and a current third year. They all have a different topic or question to discuss with you which gives you a variety of topics to shine in and also 6 different people to impress. If one goes wrong, you know you have another five! However, it is worth saying that all of the lecturers and students are lovely, I felt like they really valued my input when I interviewed.

From what I can remember, questions might be about your experience in a school environment or with children, current educational topics and your ideas about teaching or activities.

My top 3 tips would be:
> Let your passion show, they want to know why you want to teach and what motivates you.
> Do a little reading about some educational topics, even if you just see what are the top headlines in the education section on the news app.
> Be yourself and be confident!
Honestly, the lecturers do not want you to be nervous or trip you up. They are brilliant and will be able to see you passion above all! You're not a teacher yet, they're just looking for someone who has the potential to be.

Lydia :smile:


Thank you very much Lydia :smile:
This is all super helpful!!

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