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French speaking exam EDEXCEL

I'm currently doing mocks in Year 11 and am unsure about the conversation element of the speaking exam. Our teachers have been pretty vague about the conversation part of the oral exam so I was just wondering:1. For the conversation, are the questions our teacher will ask given to them by the exam board? (i.e., Set questions for each theme)2. If they are made by the exam board, will we be given prior notice and therefore time to prepare, or not?3. Do our schools/teachers come up with questions on the spot, that are in line with the chosen theme and surprise theme set by EDEXCEL.?4. If our teachers/school do come up with their own questions, would we be able to prepare answers before hand on the exact questions?If anyone who is doing their French GCSE, has already done their French GCSE, or teaches/is an examiner for the French GCSE, it would be much appreciated if you could clarify this.
Original post by voidcubess
I'm currently doing mocks in Year 11 and am unsure about the conversation element of the speaking exam. Our teachers have been pretty vague about the conversation part of the oral exam so I was just wondering:1. For the conversation, are the questions our teacher will ask given to them by the exam board? (i.e., Set questions for each theme)2. If they are made by the exam board, will we be given prior notice and therefore time to prepare, or not?3. Do our schools/teachers come up with questions on the spot, that are in line with the chosen theme and surprise theme set by EDEXCEL.?4. If our teachers/school do come up with their own questions, would we be able to prepare answers before hand on the exact questions?If anyone who is doing their French GCSE, has already done their French GCSE, or teaches/is an examiner for the French GCSE, it would be much appreciated if you could clarify this.

Exam boards don't give questions out, I think usually teachers will prepare their own questions that they may or may not choose to give to students.
If they do give a list of questions, they will also give surprise questions not on the sheet (my teacher just asked follow up questions from my previous answers). You can prepare if you have been given the questions, but it's important that your answers don't sound memorised, there is a whole section on the mark scheme for spontaneity, so don't sound like a robot, and don't sound like you've memorised them.

When I did my speaking exams, the teachers made a question sheet for each theme that they gave to us, they asked us questions that were worded similarly/asked the same question, and also gave questions that were personal to my answers. If they ask every student the same questions, they flag it up, so it will be different. It just depends on the teacher.

If you are to prepare questions, but aren't given a list of questions by your teacher, I suggest just thinking of questions that you could be asked from each topic (e.g. what is your neighbourhood like?) and prepare answers very broadly, and just practice vocab/grammar
Reply 2
Amazing! Thanks so much

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