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Becoming a therapist counsellor?

A simple question really but is there any point in doing a undergrad in psychology with counselling if I have to get extra training anyway?

I do plan to go on to do a masters, but at-least if I just focused my undergrad on psychology I could go to the university’s I wanted to (Bristol, Nottingham).

It just seems doing psychology with counselling as an undergrad makes me no closer to becoming a therapist/counsellor than just doing psychology would be.

Any advice please would be great.
Original post by Leonski2
A simple question really but is there any point in doing a undergrad in psychology with counselling if I have to get extra training anyway?

I do plan to go on to do a masters, but at-least if I just focused my undergrad on psychology I could go to the university’s I wanted to (Bristol, Nottingham).

It just seems doing psychology with counselling as an undergrad makes me no closer to becoming a therapist/counsellor than just doing psychology would be.

Any advice please would be great.


Just an overall Psychology degree should be good enough, however if you have specific interest in counselling psychology, then doing a psych with counselling might be a better idea.
However as someone who did psych undergrad and wanted to become a therapist herself, I didn't specialise in undergrad and found myself drawn to a completely different field in psychology.
It really is upto you to figure out of you're definite, or if you want to keep yourself open to other possibilities since you are doing a master's anyways.
Reply 2
Original post by Leonski2
A simple question really but is there any point in doing a undergrad in psychology with counselling if I have to get extra training anyway?

I do plan to go on to do a masters, but at-least if I just focused my undergrad on psychology I could go to the university’s I wanted to (Bristol, Nottingham).

It just seems doing psychology with counselling as an undergrad makes me no closer to becoming a therapist/counsellor than just doing psychology would be.

Any advice please would be great.


As long as the degree is accredited by the BPS, it doesn't matter which one you go for. I did my undergraduate degree in Psychology and Counselling just because I had an interest in counselling. It offered a good introduction into counselling approaches, which came in useful when I did further training as a counsellor. I did a level 3 certificate and then a level 4 diploma to qualify as a counsellor, and am now training as a CBT therapist through IAPT.

If you know you have an interest in counselling, I'd recommend that course as you are bound to enjoy it and it will be useful knowledge when you do further training.
Original post by Leonski2
A simple question really but is there any point in doing a undergrad in psychology with counselling if I have to get extra training anyway?

I do plan to go on to do a masters, but at-least if I just focused my undergrad on psychology I could go to the university’s I wanted to (Bristol, Nottingham).

It just seems doing psychology with counselling as an undergrad makes me no closer to becoming a therapist/counsellor than just doing psychology would be.

Any advice please would be great.


Hi,

I'm in my 2nd year of Psych and it's definitely worth doing if that is your career goal! You'll gain the basis of Psychology and a bit extra about counselling which is one of many therapies. You most likely will need to gain extra qualifications but it will get almost a large chunk of it out the way. You do usually cover different kind of therapies over the course of your degree, but double check the modules at your university choices.

If you take a sandwich year sometimes you can get a placement working somewhere who give therapy, and they may train you in the therapy they give too. They may pick you for a placement over someone who studies core psychology if you do counselling as well.

I hope this helps a bit,

Lauren -Official Student Rep:biggrin:
You don't need any particular degree to become a therapist or counsellor. In fact these job titles have no legal meaning so anyone can call themselves one. Most UK therapists and counsellors do training with BACP or UKCP or similar. Many in this field are successful because they get NHS referrals, and the NHS are much more likely to refer to people who have a professional background in nursing or social services or something reputable like that.

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