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Alice2411
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#1
Report Thread starter 15 years ago
#1
Why does increasing the temperature make an enzyme speed up the reaction faster?

or changin the pH, enzyme concentration and substrate concentration?
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Muse
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Temperature: In general, chemical reactions speed up as the temperature is raised. When the temperature increases, more of the reacting molecules have the kinetic energy required to undergo the reaction. Enzyme catalyzed reactions also tend to go faster with increasing temperature until a temperature optimum is reached. Above this value the conformation of the enzyme molecule is disrupted. Changing the conformation of the enzyme results in less efficient binding of the substrate. Temperatures above 40-50°C denature many enzymes
As the temperature of the enzyme increases further, the vibrational energy of the entire molecule also increases. This puts a strain on the weak interactions that hold the enzyme together.

At temperatures just above optinum temperature, there may be a situation where the enzyme is in a sort of equilibrium where it temporarily loses some of it's structure and then regains it to work again.

At higher temperatures these bonds literally get shaken apart and the three -dimensional structure of the protein destabilises. This is called denaturation. Other forces that also disrupt these bonds will have the same effect: extremes of pH, mixing a detergent, extreme concentrations of salt and so on.
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nikk
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doh i did reply but then realised it had been answered already so deleted my reply hehe.
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