The Student Room Group

Gsce eng lit

How to get a 9 in english lit gsce ?
Reply 1
Original post by chemicalmira201
How to get a 9 in english lit gsce ?


- notes & memorisation

- make a word document of powerful but versatile quotes, their analysis with alternative interpretations with evaluation, themes and motifs, and their representation, context and their connection to the text.
- condense this onto mind maps for each character and theme, possibly intertwining the two, using different colours per AO (structure: how they develop or change and why, perhaps to reinforce a theme such as toxic masculinity, gender inequality or the barriers of social class).
- you could also use flash cards for key quotes and ideas.
- NB: attempt to do as such whilst studying the work. if this is not achievable during my free periods and after school etc, do this during the closest holidays.

- revision
- write or plan essays, especially for unseen poetry comparison, using past papers, exemplar essays and mark schemes.
- use blurting for mind maps and recall for flash cards whilst effectively practising deep, word-level analysis.
- make and answer questions based on your mind maps.
- re-read your books.

- analysis quality
- resources
- use resources such as:
- Reddit and TSR for other student's notes and ideas
- https://www.acehsc.net/#121
- CGP Revision Guides
- https://www.gradesaver.com/writing-help
- https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/english-revision/gcse-edexcel/
- https://artofsmart.com.au/?s=curious+incident
- https://artofsmart.com.au/english/year-11-hsc-advanced-english-guide/
- https://artofsmart.com.au/english/hsc-english-thesis-statement/
- Knowledge Organisers;
- BBC Bitesize;
- Quizlet or brainscape;
- GetRevising:
- StudySmarter;
- LitCharts;
- Spark Notes;
- British Library;
- SENECA;
- https://www.oxnotes.com/gcse-english-literature.html
- YouTube.
- Mr Everything English;
- Stacey Reay;
- Stream English;
- Ms. Peer Editor;
- Mr Salles Teaches English;
- Mr Bruff;
- First Rate Tutors;
- Dr Aidan;
- knowIT;
- Revision Recharge.

- what on earth is critical analysis?
https://youtu.be/bAIcGlyQakI
- critical is defined as ‘expressing or involving an analysis of the merits *and* faults of a work of literature, music or art’. some synonyms include ‘evaluative, interpretative, judgmental and explanatory.’ in other words, always ask ‘why’ and ‘so what.’
- critical analysis includes evaluating the ‘50 shades of gray.’ there is not just one interpretation, but at least two, and you must show your understanding of the novel by writing such.
- critical is often confused with ‘descriptive’ whilst that is almost the opposite. a critical analysis essay is designed to persuade, not to inform or describe, which is the role of the *text*.
https://www2.southeastern.edu/Academics/Faculty/elejeune/critique.htm
FE016C44-24C9-4461-B6BF-F72DCAD74807.jpeg

- critical articles
- read critical articles about the texts that you are studying and condensers any worthy points onto a word document. Below is an example of how to incorporate this into an essay.
- “Readers and critics of the novel may question whether Woolf succeeded or not in her modernist and experimental form of writing. Although this might not have been her most successful piece of work, the techniques used were certainly successful in drawing attention to the intertwined streams of consciousness within everybody, whether people see the links or not, the constant internal conversation is what truly makes up a person. Their ‘being’ is not internally defined by external conversations or sources, instead is build upon the incoherent constant stream of thoughts that remain silent.”

- tips
https://youtu.be/C1z9wq7ObO4
- read critical articles and condense any worthy alternative interpretations onto your document and mind maps.
- don’t leave chicken on the bone! analyse multiple techniques that are often overlooked such as diction and tricolonic syntax, the connection between symbolism and connotations of nouns, imperatives, colloquial language, changes from direct address to personal pronouns or from one tense to another in one quotation.
- construct a pyramid within your analysis, start with the most potent technique and connect it with all others, even if they are juxtaposed, developing your initial point. remember to include multiple interpretations of effects of metaphorical language, such as similes, and make it unique.
- look for patterns in techniques, connotations and the importance of something whilst also analysing their slight development. this helps to identify themes, perhaps referencing context.
- identify a myriad of language, structural and form terminology with a range of relevant references from the whole text, fully developed ideas and deep, unique analysis using connotations and e.g. sociohistorical context. consistently and evaluatively* analyse the pernicious or benign effect on not only us as readers but the characters with the effective relation to the text as a whole and a detailed reference to the writer’s contextual purpose when needed. perhaps analyse the parallels between characters and themes within the novel, as well as other contextual figures or texts. *(you explore all reasons or interpretations, stating which is most significant/important because, *author* does this because…)
- There is a confident, personal response, showing a high level of engagement with the text.
- A critical style is developed and sustained with maturity, a perceptive understanding and interpretation (on a deep, complex level: repetitively asking ‘why’ and stating ‘they do this because of’ *symbols with links to themes and context, exploring why the writer presents the theme/character in such a way. perhaps to persuade the contemporaries/king or criticise someone/a societal belief*).
- There are judicious references and points made with assurance and full support from the text (track development and differences of themes and characters, asking ‘why’ and exploring how the two factors relate).
- There is excellent, convincing understanding of context and its relationship with influence upon and connection with the text. This is integrated into the response when required.

- when analysing motifs, such as gilt-ridden hands from Macbeth, and themes, such as ambition or determination, consider how they mimic or influence character development.
- e.g. Macbeth pondered whether he should kill Duncan during multiple soliloquies and a myriad of asides. *analyse incardinine seas quote in act 2 scene 2: blood *and* hand motifs of guilt and responsibility, leading to violence* this juxtaposes with his ambition and simplistic, almost naïve manner to alter the fate of the third prophecy. *analyse firstlings of heart then hand: blood *and* hand motifs of guilt and responsibility, leading to violence* employing this juxtaposition, Shakespeare may be trying to portray the pernicious development in Macbeth’s character as he is influenced by the witches who are associated with dark and death. this exemplifies Shakespeare’s opposition to King James I due to his political ambitions, such the consolidation of power, arguments with Parliament, and his beliefs in the divine right of kings. this encourages the contemporary audience to challenge these beliefs and leaves us as the modern audience to ponder whether Shakespeare’s purpose was achieved: have we learnt our lesson of the dangers of ambition? therefore, it can be argued that Macbeth’s hamartia is his determination and lust for power, not only leading to his inevitable downfall but also influencing the dramatic arc of the play between him and his wife. in support of this, the recurring result of violence that persists throughout Macbeth’s development which, as well as implying that violence is tragically unavoidable and possibly predestined, additionally alludes to the inevitable and long-standing tyranny, through the eyes of Shakespeare, of King James I.
- https://youtu.be/Fc7RrmHWOWs

for more help, email me via TSR! :smile:
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 2
Original post by fr3ts
- notes & memorisation

- make a word document of powerful but versatile quotes, their analysis with alternative interpretations with evaluation, themes and motifs, and their representation, context and their connection to the text.
- condense this onto mind maps for each character and theme, possibly intertwining the two, using different colours per AO (structure: how they develop or change and why, perhaps to reinforce a theme such as toxic masculinity, gender inequality or the barriers of social class).
- you could also use flash cards for key quotes and ideas.
- NB: attempt to do as such whilst studying the work. if this is not achievable during my free periods and after school etc, do this during the closest holidays.

- revision
- write or plan essays, especially for unseen poetry comparison, using past papers, exemplar essays and mark schemes.
- use blurting for mind maps and recall for flash cards whilst effectively practising deep, word-level analysis.
- make and answer questions based on your mind maps.
- re-read your books.

- analysis quality
- resources
- use resources such as:
- Reddit and TSR for other student's notes and ideas
- https://www.acehsc.net/#121
- CGP Revision Guides
- https://www.gradesaver.com/writing-help
- https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/english-revision/gcse-edexcel/
- https://artofsmart.com.au/?s=curious+incident
- https://artofsmart.com.au/english/year-11-hsc-advanced-english-guide/
- https://artofsmart.com.au/english/hsc-english-thesis-statement/
- Knowledge Organisers;
- BBC Bitesize;
- Quizlet or brainscape;
- GetRevising:
- StudySmarter;
- LitCharts;
- Spark Notes;
- British Library;
- SENECA;
- https://www.oxnotes.com/gcse-english-literature.html
- YouTube.
- Mr Everything English;
- Stacey Reay;
- Stream English;
- Ms. Peer Editor;
- Mr Salles Teaches English;
- Mr Bruff;
- First Rate Tutors;
- Dr Aidan;
- knowIT;
- Revision Recharge.

- what on earth is critical analysis?
https://youtu.be/bAIcGlyQakI
- critical is defined as ‘expressing or involving an analysis of the merits *and* faults of a work of literature, music or art’. some synonyms include ‘evaluative, interpretative, judgmental and explanatory.’ in other words, always ask ‘why’ and ‘so what.’
- critical analysis includes evaluating the ‘50 shades of gray.’ there is not just one interpretation, but at least two, and you must show your understanding of the novel by writing such.
- critical is often confused with ‘descriptive’ whilst that is almost the opposite. a critical analysis essay is designed to persuade, not to inform or describe, which is the role of the *text*.
https://www2.southeastern.edu/Academics/Faculty/elejeune/critique.htm
FE016C44-24C9-4461-B6BF-F72DCAD74807.jpeg

- critical articles
- read critical articles about the texts that you are studying and condensers any worthy points onto a word document. Below is an example of how to incorporate this into an essay.
- “Readers and critics of the novel may question whether Woolf succeeded or not in her modernist and experimental form of writing. Although this might not have been her most successful piece of work, the techniques used were certainly successful in drawing attention to the intertwined streams of consciousness within everybody, whether people see the links or not, the constant internal conversation is what truly makes up a person. Their ‘being’ is not internally defined by external conversations or sources, instead is build upon the incoherent constant stream of thoughts that remain silent.”

- tips
https://youtu.be/C1z9wq7ObO4
- read critical articles and condense any worthy alternative interpretations onto your document and mind maps.
- don’t leave chicken on the bone! analyse multiple techniques that are often overlooked such as diction and tricolonic syntax, the connection between symbolism and connotations of nouns, imperatives, colloquial language, changes from direct address to personal pronouns or from one tense to another in one quotation.
- construct a pyramid within your analysis, start with the most potent technique and connect it with all others, even if they are juxtaposed, developing your initial point. remember to include multiple interpretations of effects of metaphorical language, such as similes, and make it unique.
- look for patterns in techniques, connotations and the importance of something whilst also analysing their slight development. this helps to identify themes, perhaps referencing context.
- identify a myriad of language, structural and form terminology with a range of relevant references from the whole text, fully developed ideas and deep, unique analysis using connotations and e.g. sociohistorical context. consistently and evaluatively* analyse the pernicious or benign effect on not only us as readers but the characters with the effective relation to the text as a whole and a detailed reference to the writer’s contextual purpose when needed. perhaps analyse the parallels between characters and themes within the novel, as well as other contextual figures or texts. *(you explore all reasons or interpretations, stating which is most significant/important because, *author* does this because…)
- There is a confident, personal response, showing a high level of engagement with the text.
- A critical style is developed and sustained with maturity, a perceptive understanding and interpretation (on a deep, complex level: repetitively asking ‘why’ and stating ‘they do this because of’ *symbols with links to themes and context, exploring why the writer presents the theme/character in such a way. perhaps to persuade the contemporaries/king or criticise someone/a societal belief*).
- There are judicious references and points made with assurance and full support from the text (track development and differences of themes and characters, asking ‘why’ and exploring how the two factors relate).
- There is excellent, convincing understanding of context and its relationship with influence upon and connection with the text. This is integrated into the response when required.

- when analysing motifs, such as gilt-ridden hands from Macbeth, and themes, such as ambition or determination, consider how they mimic or influence character development.
- e.g. Macbeth pondered whether he should kill Duncan during multiple soliloquies and a myriad of asides. *analyse incardinine seas quote in act 2 scene 2: blood *and* hand motifs of guilt and responsibility, leading to violence* this juxtaposes with his ambition and simplistic, almost naïve manner to alter the fate of the third prophecy. *analyse firstlings of heart then hand: blood *and* hand motifs of guilt and responsibility, leading to violence* employing this juxtaposition, Shakespeare may be trying to portray the pernicious development in Macbeth’s character as he is influenced by the witches who are associated with dark and death. this exemplifies Shakespeare’s opposition to King James I due to his political ambitions, such the consolidation of power, arguments with Parliament, and his beliefs in the divine right of kings. this encourages the contemporary audience to challenge these beliefs and leaves us as the modern audience to ponder whether Shakespeare’s purpose was achieved: have we learnt our lesson of the dangers of ambition? therefore, it can be argued that Macbeth’s hamartia is his determination and lust for power, not only leading to his inevitable downfall but also influencing the dramatic arc of the play between him and his wife. in support of this, the recurring result of violence that persists throughout Macbeth’s development which, as well as implying that violence is tragically unavoidable and possibly predestined, additionally alludes to the inevitable and long-standing tyranny, through the eyes of Shakespeare, of King James I.
- https://youtu.be/Fc7RrmHWOWs

for more help, email me via TSR! :smile:

You’re amazing!

Do you recommend any of the resources more than others?
Reply 3
Original post by Inc3me
You’re amazing!

Do you recommend any of the resources more than others?


YouTube is an absolute godsend and I have sent the recommended youtubers. Here they are again:
- Mr Everything English;
- Stacey Reay;
- Stream English;
- Ms. Peer Editor;
- Mr Salles Teaches English;
- Mr Bruff;
- First Rate Tutors;
- Dr Aidan;
- knowIT;
- Revision Recharge.
GetRevising is also incredible, as well as Reddit. Just look at the r/revision resources tag and search up the book or poem! Quizlet is also very good for quotes, so those are the best ones to use. :smile:
Reply 4
Original post by fr3ts
- notes & memorisation

- make a word document of powerful but versatile quotes, their analysis with alternative interpretations with evaluation, themes and motifs, and their representation, context and their connection to the text.
- condense this onto mind maps for each character and theme, possibly intertwining the two, using different colours per AO (structure: how they develop or change and why, perhaps to reinforce a theme such as toxic masculinity, gender inequality or the barriers of social class).
- you could also use flash cards for key quotes and ideas.
- NB: attempt to do as such whilst studying the work. if this is not achievable during my free periods and after school etc, do this during the closest holidays.

- revision
- write or plan essays, especially for unseen poetry comparison, using past papers, exemplar essays and mark schemes.
- use blurting for mind maps and recall for flash cards whilst effectively practising deep, word-level analysis.
- make and answer questions based on your mind maps.
- re-read your books.

- analysis quality
- resources
- use resources such as:
- Reddit and TSR for other student's notes and ideas
- https://www.acehsc.net/#121
- CGP Revision Guides
- https://www.gradesaver.com/writing-help
- https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/english-revision/gcse-edexcel/
- https://artofsmart.com.au/?s=curious+incident
- https://artofsmart.com.au/english/year-11-hsc-advanced-english-guide/
- https://artofsmart.com.au/english/hsc-english-thesis-statement/
- Knowledge Organisers;
- BBC Bitesize;
- Quizlet or brainscape;
- GetRevising:
- StudySmarter;
- LitCharts;
- Spark Notes;
- British Library;
- SENECA;
- https://www.oxnotes.com/gcse-english-literature.html
- YouTube.
- Mr Everything English;
- Stacey Reay;
- Stream English;
- Ms. Peer Editor;
- Mr Salles Teaches English;
- Mr Bruff;
- First Rate Tutors;
- Dr Aidan;
- knowIT;
- Revision Recharge.

- what on earth is critical analysis?
https://youtu.be/bAIcGlyQakI
- critical is defined as ‘expressing or involving an analysis of the merits *and* faults of a work of literature, music or art’. some synonyms include ‘evaluative, interpretative, judgmental and explanatory.’ in other words, always ask ‘why’ and ‘so what.’
- critical analysis includes evaluating the ‘50 shades of gray.’ there is not just one interpretation, but at least two, and you must show your understanding of the novel by writing such.
- critical is often confused with ‘descriptive’ whilst that is almost the opposite. a critical analysis essay is designed to persuade, not to inform or describe, which is the role of the *text*.
https://www2.southeastern.edu/Academics/Faculty/elejeune/critique.htm
FE016C44-24C9-4461-B6BF-F72DCAD74807.jpeg

- critical articles
- read critical articles about the texts that you are studying and condensers any worthy points onto a word document. Below is an example of how to incorporate this into an essay.
- “Readers and critics of the novel may question whether Woolf succeeded or not in her modernist and experimental form of writing. Although this might not have been her most successful piece of work, the techniques used were certainly successful in drawing attention to the intertwined streams of consciousness within everybody, whether people see the links or not, the constant internal conversation is what truly makes up a person. Their ‘being’ is not internally defined by external conversations or sources, instead is build upon the incoherent constant stream of thoughts that remain silent.”

- tips
https://youtu.be/C1z9wq7ObO4
- read critical articles and condense any worthy alternative interpretations onto your document and mind maps.
- don’t leave chicken on the bone! analyse multiple techniques that are often overlooked such as diction and tricolonic syntax, the connection between symbolism and connotations of nouns, imperatives, colloquial language, changes from direct address to personal pronouns or from one tense to another in one quotation.
- construct a pyramid within your analysis, start with the most potent technique and connect it with all others, even if they are juxtaposed, developing your initial point. remember to include multiple interpretations of effects of metaphorical language, such as similes, and make it unique.
- look for patterns in techniques, connotations and the importance of something whilst also analysing their slight development. this helps to identify themes, perhaps referencing context.
- identify a myriad of language, structural and form terminology with a range of relevant references from the whole text, fully developed ideas and deep, unique analysis using connotations and e.g. sociohistorical context. consistently and evaluatively* analyse the pernicious or benign effect on not only us as readers but the characters with the effective relation to the text as a whole and a detailed reference to the writer’s contextual purpose when needed. perhaps analyse the parallels between characters and themes within the novel, as well as other contextual figures or texts. *(you explore all reasons or interpretations, stating which is most significant/important because, *author* does this because…)
- There is a confident, personal response, showing a high level of engagement with the text.
- A critical style is developed and sustained with maturity, a perceptive understanding and interpretation (on a deep, complex level: repetitively asking ‘why’ and stating ‘they do this because of’ *symbols with links to themes and context, exploring why the writer presents the theme/character in such a way. perhaps to persuade the contemporaries/king or criticise someone/a societal belief*).
- There are judicious references and points made with assurance and full support from the text (track development and differences of themes and characters, asking ‘why’ and exploring how the two factors relate).
- There is excellent, convincing understanding of context and its relationship with influence upon and connection with the text. This is integrated into the response when required.

- when analysing motifs, such as gilt-ridden hands from Macbeth, and themes, such as ambition or determination, consider how they mimic or influence character development.
- e.g. Macbeth pondered whether he should kill Duncan during multiple soliloquies and a myriad of asides. *analyse incardinine seas quote in act 2 scene 2: blood *and* hand motifs of guilt and responsibility, leading to violence* this juxtaposes with his ambition and simplistic, almost naïve manner to alter the fate of the third prophecy. *analyse firstlings of heart then hand: blood *and* hand motifs of guilt and responsibility, leading to violence* employing this juxtaposition, Shakespeare may be trying to portray the pernicious development in Macbeth’s character as he is influenced by the witches who are associated with dark and death. this exemplifies Shakespeare’s opposition to King James I due to his political ambitions, such the consolidation of power, arguments with Parliament, and his beliefs in the divine right of kings. this encourages the contemporary audience to challenge these beliefs and leaves us as the modern audience to ponder whether Shakespeare’s purpose was achieved: have we learnt our lesson of the dangers of ambition? therefore, it can be argued that Macbeth’s hamartia is his determination and lust for power, not only leading to his inevitable downfall but also influencing the dramatic arc of the play between him and his wife. in support of this, the recurring result of violence that persists throughout Macbeth’s development which, as well as implying that violence is tragically unavoidable and possibly predestined, additionally alludes to the inevitable and long-standing tyranny, through the eyes of Shakespeare, of King James I.
- https://youtu.be/Fc7RrmHWOWs

for more help, email me via TSR! :smile:


Wow lots of info there! Umm just wondering if you have any of your resources that you used in your gcse for English you could share with me. For ref, I’m doing Macbeth AIC and ACC
Reply 5
Original post by I.M.8
Wow lots of info there! Umm just wondering if you have any of your resources that you used in your gcse for English you could share with me. For ref, I’m doing Macbeth AIC and ACC


I may have a few essays and some resources, let me send them. :smile:

Macbeth:
- Some essays from my study group.
- Some knowledge organisers.
Reply 6
Original post by I.M.8
Wow lots of info there! Umm just wondering if you have any of your resources that you used in your gcse for English you could share with me. For ref, I’m doing Macbeth AIC and ACC


AIC:
- Knowledge organisers.
- Quotations.
- Revision booklets and example analysis.
Original post by fr3ts
I may have a few essays and some resources, let me send them. :smile:

Macbeth:
- Some essays from my study group.
- Some knowledge organisers.

Thank you so much for all of this. I think i’ve done pretty decent in my eng mock by using ur advice. Thank you again 😁😁
Reply 9
Original post by fr3ts
AIC:
- Knowledge organisers.
- Quotations.
- Revision booklets and example analysis.

Thanks for all this. Love you life saver. Is this everything you used to get a 9…or?
Reply 10
Original post by I.M.8
Thanks for all this. Love you life saver. Is this everything you used to get a 9…or?


One more thing that might be useful. :smile: Feel free to ask me about anything that is written.

Fr3ts' Guide to Dig Deeper in Literary Analysis pg1.jpegFr3ts' Guide to Dig Deeper in Literary Analysis pg2.jpeg

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