The Student Room Group

Does anyone view school/college as a jail?

You're trapped in the classroom and the classroom feels like a prison cell

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Better to be 'trapped' there than on a factory floor or the dole office.
Original post by ROTL94 3
Better to be 'trapped' there than on a factory floor or the dole office.

Is it though? Not everyone is clever enough for further education. Some people prefer to leave education as soon as possible and get a job. So your status changes from student to unemployed if you leave education early.
Original post by Anony345533
Is it though? Not everyone is clever enough for further education. Some people prefer to leave education as soon as possible and get a job. So your status changes from student to unemployed if you leave education early.


Yeah, I'm on the dole now because I am too disabled to work and I spent 7 years working 60 hrs a week on a factory floor until I went back to college so I could go to law school and get a degree. Being in education was much better than both of the former things.
Original post by ROTL94 3
Yeah, I'm on the dole now because I am too disabled to work and I spent 7 years working 60 hrs a week on a factory floor until I went back to college so I could go to law school and get a degree. Being in education was much better than both of the former things.

But does studying affect your (mental) health? It does for me.

Is working easier than studying? As in degree level study is harder than working entry level jobs without degrees?
I suppose I can see the parallels but to actually view it as a jail feels disrespectful to people who are actually in prison
I don't like schools at all, I think they're awful institutions, and yes rather like a jail at times. I would never send my kids back to school.

Colleges and sixth form colleges though, as well as universities, allow for much more independence and they tend to treat students as human beings.
Oh yessss.... :biggrin:
As one of the Sanderson sisters said in the first Hocus Pocus movie, high school is a type of prison and the sinister 'stepford students' purpose of educational classes is really to mass detain young humans in a classroom for most of their early years as soon as they are able to walk & talk without much help.:tongue:
BBHE.jpg
Thanks goodness we Union Jack Wearing Bulldogs do not have compulsory schooling.
We get to spend all of our time guzzling tasty treats, waging war upon the cats & their allies, celebrating brexit and having fun. :cool:
No feline indoctrination, no school education, no thought control and no jamie oliver approved food. :giggle:
It's a dog's life. :woo:
Nah no one who had spent even a day in a cell with all the limitations would think this. Also when you get in trouble at school, they don't tend to punish you with more years of school.
No because in school I can drop the soap and pick it back up without any issues.
Original post by Anony345533
You're trapped in the classroom and the classroom feels like a prison cell


I used to think of school this way, but since I've been let loose into adulthood, I crave that linear school environment now. School is the best way to make friends, it has an environment that's familiar where you get to know people, and whilst you're there you aren't lonely. I know school is full of subjects that won't appeal to a vast group of people, but school is easier than life on the outside. Yes, you have more options outside, but you also have way more ways to fall and fail and it's harder to be encouraged to get back up and continue on. Heck, I think without the familiarity school environment, many people will feel lost and your sense of importance becomes diminished.

So no, I don't see the classroom or school as a prison personally.
Original post by ROTL94 3
Better to be 'trapped' there than on a factory floor or the dole office.


Having worked on a factory floor I agree. At least school doesn't make you stand up all day.
Original post by Anony345533
You're trapped in the classroom and the classroom feels like a prison cell


I've got some mixed feeling about this.

I love learning and given the right environment I love academia, but I HATED secondary school. The staff (most but not all of course) treated the students like prisoners (going back to your metaphor), had no respect for them (I believe in mutual respect) and loved to be on a power trip implementing stupid rules and punishments that didn't benefit the students. I don't tend to wish unwell onto others, but I hope karma will come back to them, although I doubt it. And back to the prison thing - we had barbed wire all around the school perimeter and the gates were closed from 9 to 5.

College on the other hand? That felt better. The tutors didn't seem to suffer from some form of God complex anymore and treated us like adults (although obviously adults with limited life experience). They were there to teach us and ensure we had the right environment for that. If there was a reason you couldn't attend - fine. If you simply didn't want to attend but you were on top of your work - also fine (some tutors even suggested we don't need to come in for their classes if we hand everything in early). They were there to teach us and mentor us. It felt human.

Would I say it's a good idea for anybody under 16 or even 18 to drop out of education and get a job? No. If you don't like the standard education setting go pursue an apprenticeship or at least finish your qualifications and try to look for a decent job.

Without level 3 qualifications and without GCSEs the best you're gonna end up doing is dead-beat jobs like warehouse and factory work. Is it shameful to do those jobs? No. But you do not understand the toll it puts on your body. And it really doesn't pay well at all. You do not want to get stuck in that kinda job for long - it will ruin you. And in most places there aren't many options for progression out of these jobs. And they don't pay well either - most are the minimum wage.

If you're "lucky" enough to get into something better paid like construction (which might or might not be hard without qualifications) once again it's not a job you can do all your life so you either change jobs and start from zero or start your own business and hope for the best if you have the skills to keep it afloat.

So while I agree that school sucks, it's still better than going to work as an under 16 (which has multiple legal limitations anyway and for a good reason).

You really have to be lucky, super crafty or have good family connections and backup to come out well out of that.
Original post by Mara1680
I've got some mixed feeling about this.

I love learning and given the right environment I love academia, but I HATED secondary school. The staff (most but not all of course) treated the students like prisoners (going back to your metaphor), had no respect for them (I believe in mutual respect) and loved to be on a power trip implementing stupid rules and punishments that didn't benefit the students. I don't tend to wish unwell onto others, but I hope karma will come back to them, although I doubt it. And back to the prison thing - we had barbed wire all around the school perimeter and the gates were closed from 9 to 5.

College on the other hand? That felt better. The tutors didn't seem to suffer from some form of God complex anymore and treated us like adults (although obviously adults with limited life experience). They were there to teach us and ensure we had the right environment for that. If there was a reason you couldn't attend - fine. If you simply didn't want to attend but you were on top of your work - also fine (some tutors even suggested we don't need to come in for their classes if we hand everything in early). They were there to teach us and mentor us. It felt human.

Would I say it's a good idea for anybody under 16 or even 18 to drop out of education and get a job? No. If you don't like the standard education setting go pursue an apprenticeship or at least finish your qualifications and try to look for a decent job.

Without level 3 qualifications and without GCSEs the best you're gonna end up doing is dead-beat jobs like warehouse and factory work. Is it shameful to do those jobs? No. But you do not understand the toll it puts on your body. And it really doesn't pay well at all. You do not want to get stuck in that kinda job for long - it will ruin you. And in most places there aren't many options for progression out of these jobs. And they don't pay well either - most are the minimum wage.

If you're "lucky" enough to get into something better paid like construction (which might or might not be hard without qualifications) once again it's not a job you can do all your life so you either change jobs and start from zero or start your own business and hope for the best if you have the skills to keep it afloat.

So while I agree that school sucks, it's still better than going to work as an under 16 (which has multiple legal limitations anyway and for a good reason).

You really have to be lucky, super crafty or have good family connections and backup to come out well out of that.


It's not an either/or situation though. Home education is perfectly valid. It's not as though there's no way to gain qualifications without going to school.
Original post by PinkMobilePhone
It's not an either/or situation though. Home education is perfectly valid. It's not as though there's no way to gain qualifications without going to school.


Fair point. Although, most people lack the work ethic and commitment to make it work. A lot of people lack the money and for younger kids, their parents do not have the time to home school them.

So either, the parents hire a tutor (lack of money is the limiting factor here because it's expensive).
The parents home school their children (lack of time and skill is the limiting factor here).
The child tutors themselves in which case they have to pay for their exams (which are quite expensive for level 3 qualifications, and level 2 qualifications are cheaper but you have to multiply them times 10 subjects to match your peers), be able to research and understand the different awarding bodies and their mark schemes, be able to self-asses their work accurately, have the work ethic to spend an appropriate amount of time and effort every day to complete the work whilst there is nothing "forcing" them to, if they run into a problem they can't understand by themselves they need to be able to seek the answer from a more qualified person.

I also presume there are some legal requirements (parents have to prove the child is actually being educated).

Additionally, in a situation like the pandemic, the home-schooled kids get ****ed over.

Of course, there have been some success stories about home-schooled kids.

However, I don't think most families are genuinely able to do that, and I don't think it's a good option for younger kids because they need to be exposed to the outside world, peers and adults as much as possible to develop healthy social skills.
Original post by Mara1680
Fair point. Although, most people lack the work ethic and commitment to make it work. A lot of people lack the money and for younger kids, their parents do not have the time to home school them.

So either, the parents hire a tutor (lack of money is the limiting factor here because it's expensive).
The parents home school their children (lack of time and skill is the limiting factor here).
The child tutors themselves in which case they have to pay for their exams (which are quite expensive for level 3 qualifications, and level 2 qualifications are cheaper but you have to multiply them times 10 subjects to match your peers), be able to research and understand the different awarding bodies and their mark schemes, be able to self-asses their work accurately, have the work ethic to spend an appropriate amount of time and effort every day to complete the work whilst there is nothing "forcing" them to, if they run into a problem they can't understand by themselves they need to be able to seek the answer from a more qualified person.

I also presume there are some legal requirements (parents have to prove the child is actually being educated).

Additionally, in a situation like the pandemic, the home-schooled kids get ****ed over.

Of course, there have been some success stories about home-schooled kids.

However, I don't think most families are genuinely able to do that, and I don't think it's a good option for younger kids because they need to be exposed to the outside world, peers and adults as much as possible to develop healthy social skills.


I agree with everything other than the last paragraph. You can be homeschooled but still have healthy social skills and be exposed to the outside world (assuming that you're not being chucked an electronic device in hand to act as a substitute for parenting on a frequent basis) or in my case, go to regular school but still have crap social skills until secondary school was over.
Original post by Mara1680
College on the other hand? That felt better. The tutors didn't seem to suffer from some form of God complex anymore and treated us like adults (although obviously adults with limited life experience). They were there to teach us and ensure we had the right environment for that. If there was a reason you couldn't attend - fine. If you simply didn't want to attend but you were on top of your work - also fine (some tutors even suggested we don't need to come in for their classes if we hand everything in early). They were there to teach us and mentor us. It felt human.

Meh wasn't the case for me in sixth form but everyone's experiences are different.
Original post by PinkMobilePhone
I don't like schools at all, I think they're awful institutions, and yes rather like a jail at times. I would never send my kids back to school.

Colleges and sixth form colleges though, as well as universities, allow for much more independence and they tend to treat students as human beings.


Many schools do treat students like human beings - don't assume they are all the same.
Original post by Talkative Toad
Meh wasn't the case for me in sixth form but everyone's experiences are different.


I kind of figured sixth form would be too similar to secondary school. I had some decent options there, but as soon as I got to the rules including uniform and being unable to leave grounds even when you didn't have any classes I noped out.

I remember a specific secondary school teacher "advertising" sixth forms by talking about how much they are like school, and discourage students from colleges by implying they give too much freedom. Every time I was like ??? wtf are you even on about, do you even hear yourself?
Original post by Talkative Toad
I agree with everything other than the last paragraph. You can be homeschooled but still have healthy social skills and be exposed to the outside world (assuming that you're not being chucked an electronic device in hand to act as a substitute for parenting on a frequent basis) or in my case, go to regular school but still have crap social skills until secondary school was over.


I think it's harder and harder for kids to develop social skills because of technology and decreasing parental involvement.

But when writing this I had a particular example in mind. A girl in my primary school. Apparently she was a healthy kid. Checked out for autism, disabilities etc, came back fine. But she was completely non-verbal. She did not engage with anybody in the class. I'm still not sure if she was pretending she wasn't there or that we weren't there. Her parents were actually lovely people, but a bit overprotective. They tried to help her interact but I'm not sure if it was too late or simply not enough. First time she's ever gone to school was when she was 7 or 8.

Additionally, from my experience (mostly from babysitting and observing family and friends' kids) children nowadays show distinct disinterest in socializing (at least in the non-digital ways). It's sad really. I see their parents do such mental acrobatics to be able to get their kids to show interest in anything but TV/tablet/phone/computer/console. Don't get me wrong, this isn't one of those "back in my days" kind of rant. Myself and my childhood friends also used to play videogames and watch TV. But most of us were able and willing to engage in all sorts of other activities that 1. involved other human beings 2. didn't involve a screen. It's just a bit scary and makes me wonder how communication will develop because of that. As Gen Z and younger millenials entered the workforce, phone calls are slowly becoming less common. I know an irritating amount of people who seem to be physically unable to answer an email (as in a mental block, not technically-challenged).

So while I'm not saying it's impossible for somebody to develop healthy social skills whilst home-schooled or lack thereof during traditional education (I myself suffered from a lack of them but it's presumably due to social anxiety and likely being somewhere on the autism spectrum rather than the environment) I think it's becoming more challenging and it would have to involve a lot of dedication and engagement from the parents.

Another thing I am curious about (since I don't know either from experience or research) how do home-schooled kids fare in higher education. Never having been exposed to these kind of structures and then being thrown into an institution like university seems like it could be quite a shock. I would love to one day meet somebody who could give me some insight into their experiences with that.

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