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what A-levels Im confused

I want to do English Language and some type of psychology (struggling with that too) should I do classics or philosophy and ethics-buddhism
It depends really where you want to go from there. (I took English Lang and Psychology as two of my A levels!) If you want to do something more with ethics/philosophy as a career or future, go with that - I would say classics would probably be better if you were doing Literature or wanting something to do with Literature basis...Or you could just decide which one sounds cooler and go with that
Original post by giulia.lucaa
I want to do English Language and some type of psychology (struggling with that too) should I do classics or philosophy and ethics-buddhism


The first thing I would ask is what sort of career or field that you want to go into. Second, is check whether you need a specific degree for that. Third, check the entry requirements for the degree and pick your A Level subjects from there, if required.

If you're just looking to do something in psychology or psychotherapy, then you would need specific accredited degrees approved by specific health organisations. Most of the accredited degrees won't require specific subjects, but if they do, Psychology/Biology are the semi-possible required subjects.

English Language isn't a required subject. You can study classics, which is a required subject for classics degrees. You don't need specific subjects for philosophy degrees.

If you're just picking subjects that involves a lot of thinking, then I recommend looking at philosophy. Psychology is more about research methods used for understand the brain. Sociology is more like applied psychology on a society wide level. Politics is not my subject of choice, but it involves elements of philosophy because ethics/laws is usually involved (no comment). Religious Studies is also akin to philsophy in a sense because it involves questioning the existence of a higher being, as well as studying religions around the world.

I was reluctant to mention criminology, but I am throwing it in as well. Although it's like sociology with a focus on criminality, I am not sure whether it focuses more on law than anything else. It's also not likely to be widely available as an A Level, but more as a Level 3 diploma which can be an issue with certain universities. Also, to study criminology at university, you don't need any specific A Level subjects.

Law is another A Level that I would be very reluctant to mention, but it does involve a lot of "debating". However, I have noted that a number of people have strong opinions about it at A Level along with their results. It's also one of those subjects where you don't need it in order to do it at degree level.

If you want to study classics, then I think you would be able to get in with either just Latin or Classical Greek instead of Classical Civilisations, but you would have to check the entry requirements of individual degree courses to be sure.

In terms of required subjects, I would be careful of whether skipping, Psychology, Biology, Latin, Classical Greek, Classical Civilisations for Psychology or Classics degrees. Otherwise, you're free to pick any subjects that peak your interest.

In terms of whether your subjects are considered "academic enough", most of the subjects I have listed are fine. Sociology may be a slight possible exception because of how "easy" it's rumoured to be. However, that's not for me to say.

If you want to take a look at the list of A Levels possible, consider looking at:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Advanced_Level_subjects
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/gce-as-and-a-level-subject-content
Original post by MindMax2000
The first thing I would ask is what sort of career or field that you want to go into. Second, is check whether you need a specific degree for that. Third, check the entry requirements for the degree and pick your A Level subjects from there, if required.

If you're just looking to do something in psychology or psychotherapy, then you would need specific accredited degrees approved by specific health organisations. Most of the accredited degrees won't require specific subjects, but if they do, Psychology/Biology are the semi-possible required subjects.

English Language isn't a required subject. You can study classics, which is a required subject for classics degrees. You don't need specific subjects for philosophy degrees.

If you're just picking subjects that involves a lot of thinking, then I recommend looking at philosophy. Psychology is more about research methods used for understand the brain. Sociology is more like applied psychology on a society wide level. Politics is not my subject of choice, but it involves elements of philosophy because ethics/laws is usually involved (no comment). Religious Studies is also akin to philsophy in a sense because it involves questioning the existence of a higher being, as well as studying religions around the world.

I was reluctant to mention criminology, but I am throwing it in as well. Although it's like sociology with a focus on criminality, I am not sure whether it focuses more on law than anything else. It's also not likely to be widely available as an A Level, but more as a Level 3 diploma which can be an issue with certain universities. Also, to study criminology at university, you don't need any specific A Level subjects.

Law is another A Level that I would be very reluctant to mention, but it does involve a lot of "debating". However, I have noted that a number of people have strong opinions about it at A Level along with their results. It's also one of those subjects where you don't need it in order to do it at degree level.

If you want to study classics, then I think you would be able to get in with either just Latin or Classical Greek instead of Classical Civilisations, but you would have to check the entry requirements of individual degree courses to be sure.

In terms of required subjects, I would be careful of whether skipping, Psychology, Biology, Latin, Classical Greek, Classical Civilisations for Psychology or Classics degrees. Otherwise, you're free to pick any subjects that peak your interest.

In terms of whether your subjects are considered "academic enough", most of the subjects I have listed are fine. Sociology may be a slight possible exception because of how "easy" it's rumoured to be. However, that's not for me to say.

If you want to take a look at the list of A Levels possible, consider looking at:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Advanced_Level_subjects
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/gce-as-and-a-level-subject-content

Hi - I actually do Criminology funny enough so I'm happy to share my input here - there are four units to complete over two years (or two units in one year for a certificate) and they pretty much heavily center around law...this is stronger though in Unit 3 and 4 which is what you learn in Yr 13 or equivalent.

For my Level 3 Diploma (WJEC) the units we study are:
Unit 1 - Changing Awareness of Crime (we did mostly campaign-based activity work)
Unit 2 - Criminological theories (these include the reasonings behind offending and offender behaviour)
Unit 3 - Crime scene to Courtroom (looks at the process of a crime from it being found to the offender being prosecuted)
Unit 4 - Crime and Punishment (Pretty self explanatory here but we mostly look at the legal system and how it affects policies and how laws are made)

Hope this helped :smile:

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