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Not doing a DT A level but want to take architecture at uni? How can I practice?

I want to take fine art, maths, and French at A-level, but my friends say I should take a DT subject if I want to do architecture. However, I'm not good at the practical side of it and am not taking it for GCSE.

1. Are my choices ok if I think they're the subjects I will do best at?

2. I'm currently in year 10. What can I do to start learning/practicing construction now so I'm not at a disadvantage in uni?

Thank you :smile:
Original post by alycia1
I want to take fine art, maths, and French at A-level, but my friends say I should take a DT subject if I want to do architecture. However, I'm not good at the practical side of it and am not taking it for GCSE.

1. Are my choices ok if I think they're the subjects I will do best at?

2. I'm currently in year 10. What can I do to start learning/practicing construction now so I'm not at a disadvantage in uni?

Thank you :smile:


Don't listen to friends for advice about uni subjects - they usually don't have any experience of the subject and are usually wrong. No uni asks for DT to enter their architecture course (but it would be an acceptable subject if you did take it).

Your A level choices are fine for architecture and its good that you are considering subjects that you enjoy and are best at. You don't need to learn, and you won't be expected to know, anything about construction before your degree course starts. As part of the uni application process you will be required to submit a portfolio of artwork for most courses - your A level art will help you prepare for this.

You might consider reading the odd book on architecture (Cambridge's website has a suggested reading list) but focus on your GCSEs for now and leave this until the summer after you've taken your exams.
(edited 1 year ago)
As above - don’t take DT based on your friends advice!

When you get into your art studies see if you can tackle some work by bringing in 3D art - sculpture, modelmaking, fashion design. Taking plans and designs from a 2d plan and creating something in 3d. Even better if you can then use that 3d creation to see something new and draw/paint it from different angles to represent it back in 2d again.
Reply 3
Original post by PQ
As above - don’t take DT based on your friends advice!

When you get into your art studies see if you can tackle some work by bringing in 3D art - sculpture, modelmaking, fashion design. Taking plans and designs from a 2d plan and creating something in 3d. Even better if you can then use that 3d creation to see something new and draw/paint it from different angles to represent it back in 2d again.


Thank you, I'm learning how to sew/design fashion rn as a hobby and have wanted to learn clay sculpture for a while so it's helpful knowing these will be beneficial in the future
Reply 4
Original post by normaw
Don't listen to friends for advice about uni subjects - they usually don't have any experience of the subject and are usually wrong. No uni asks for DT to enter their architecture course (but it would be an acceptable subject if you did take it).

Your A level choices are fine for architecture and its good that you are considering subjects that you enjoy and are best at. You don't need to learn, and you won't be expected to know, anything about construction before your degree course starts. As part of the uni application process you will be required to submit a portfolio of artwork for most courses - your A level art will help you prepare for this.

You might consider reading the odd book on architecture (Cambridge's website has a suggested reading list) but focus on your GCSEs for now and leave this until the summer after you've taken your exams.

Thank you! Is it harder not knowing anything about construction before hand?
Original post by alycia1
Thank you! Is it harder not knowing anything about construction before hand?

No it's not harder. You will learn everything you need to know on the course.
Why not take History and Science A Levels? Both present clear factual knoeledge, but more importantly they bring the 'what if' factor, a spirit in the soul of design. Business studies delivers what it says on the can! Maths might be more important though.Also consider vacation internship at a local Architects Practice and seek out preparatory literature at the RIBA.I wouldn't worry about construction techniques. They costantly change and too varied. Don't let limited technical knowledge restrict your developing design persona.
Original post by SCHAROUN
Both present clear factual knoeledge, but more importantly they bring the 'what if' factor, a spirit in the soul of design.

What on earth are you talking about?

The OP's A level choices are fine for architecture.
Original post by normaw
What on earth are you talking about?

The OP's A level choices are fine for architecture.


'Fine' may not be enough. Rigour is essential to deal with the time it will take to become Chartered.
Original post by SCHAROUN
'Fine' may not be enough. Rigour is essential to deal with the time it will take to become Chartered.


'Fine' is enough. Only five out of nearly 50 unis in the UK request/prefer specific subjects for architecture. Subject choice has nothing to do with how long it takes to qualify.
Original post by SCHAROUN
Why


Your suggestions are flawed - Art and Maths are a great combination
Reply 11
Original post by SCHAROUN
Why not take History and Science A Levels? Both present clear factual knoeledge, but more importantly they bring the 'what if' factor, a spirit in the soul of design. Business studies delivers what it says on the can! Maths might be more important though.Also consider vacation internship at a local Architects Practice and seek out preparatory literature at the RIBA.I wouldn't worry about construction techniques. They costantly change and too varied. Don't let limited technical knowledge restrict your developing design persona.

Because they're my worst subjects,,

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