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Worried I'll never lose weight

I always used to be able to eat anything and not get fat, but I started getting fat about 5 years ago. I'm not really fat, but I do have a bit of a belly now. I always ate a bit too much, but that never used to matter. I have gotten a bit lazier, would that make such a difference though? I think it might have been the medication that did it. I think I've been on it for about 5 years (I stopped taking it now) and that's when I started getting fat. I've tried dieting and going to the gym but it's hard being starving all the time and the gym kills me (I've got really unfit) so I stopped bothering. I'm determined to try again in the New Year and stick to it but I read a worrying article that said that some medication can make you fat forever and you can never lose it. I wasn't dieting/exercising for that long but I think I should've lost a bit of weight, I kept it up for a month or so (with the occasional wobble) before quitting. The medication I was taking was Sertraline, if that makes a difference.
Reply 1
I'm not sure how old you are now, but for people that used to be able to eat anything and not get fat, but not anymore.... at a certain age you start losing muscle mass slowly. This is somewhere in your 20s, that is, unless you resistance train. Since muscle uses energy even at rest, it means the amount of food you ate before that maintained your weight, now makes you gradually gain weight. Also, younger people tend to be more full of energy and run around a lot. If you stop doing that, you use less energy and gain weight.

It is not true that a medication can make you fat forever. If you use more energy than you consume, your body will always use body fat to make up the deficit, otherwise you would die. What some medications can do is perhaps make you feel tired all the time, so you move less. Or they could increase your appetite and make you eat more. So the good news is, it's never too late.

It's a matter of finding a diet you are prepared to eat in the long term (no crash diets) and the same for an exericse regime. When you say gym kills you, are you doing high intensity cardio? This is not necessary. Some people genuinely enjoy high intensity cardio but you can burn just as much energy by walking uphill on a tradmill, or cycling at a moderate pace whilst watching TV. This will take a bit longer, but is easy. The long game is to build muscle by lifting weights and eating enough protein, which will increase the amount of calories required to maintain your weight. Most average people need more muscle to be honest. The majority of chronic back pains people get in their middle ages are due to being too weak.
Original post by Kyri
I'm not sure how old you are now, but for people that used to be able to eat anything and not get fat, but not anymore.... at a certain age you start losing muscle mass slowly. This is somewhere in your 20s, that is, unless you resistance train. Since muscle uses energy even at rest, it means the amount of food you ate before that maintained your weight, now makes you gradually gain weight. Also, younger people tend to be more full of energy and run around a lot. If you stop doing that, you use less energy and gain weight.

It is not true that a medication can make you fat forever. If you use more energy than you consume, your body will always use body fat to make up the deficit, otherwise you would die. What some medications can do is perhaps make you feel tired all the time, so you move less. Or they could increase your appetite and make you eat more. So the good news is, it's never too late.

It's a matter of finding a diet you are prepared to eat in the long term (no crash diets) and the same for an exericse regime. When you say gym kills you, are you doing high intensity cardio? This is not necessary. Some people genuinely enjoy high intensity cardio but you can burn just as much energy by walking uphill on a tradmill, or cycling at a moderate pace whilst watching TV. This will take a bit longer, but is easy. The long game is to build muscle by lifting weights and eating enough protein, which will increase the amount of calories required to maintain your weight. Most average people need more muscle to be honest. The majority of chronic back pains people get in their middle ages are due to being too weak.

I'm in my early 20s now.

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