The Student Room Group

Puppy chewed on cold and flu tablets?

11 week old puppy chewed a pack of tablets, he hasn't eaten a full one and only 1 looked like it's pierced a bit with his tooth but the tablets still intact so I'm not sure if he even managed to ingest any of the powder.

The tablets contain paracetamol and caffeine. He seems absolutely fine and it's probably been hours since he chewed on these. Should he be OK?
Original post by Anonymous
11 week old puppy chewed a pack of tablets, he hasn't eaten a full one and only 1 looked like it's pierced a bit with his tooth but the tablets still intact so I'm not sure if he even managed to ingest any of the powder.

The tablets contain paracetamol and caffeine. He seems absolutely fine and it's probably been hours since he chewed on these. Should he be OK?


You should actually contact your pet veterinary practice for further advice on this as they will be more than happy to assist you with this matter. Although he may be fine you don't know if it's doing any harm to the pet.
Just give your pet veterinary practice a call asap and see what they say as just explain what exactly happened okay. Better be safe than sorry.


A registered vet nurse.

================================

Some cold and flu medications have more than one active ingredient, which can make them dangerous for your dog. If you suspect your dog has swallowed any cold or flu medication, please contact your veterinarian, an emergency hospital, and/or pet poison helpline as soon as possible.

Cold & Flu Medicine That is Toxic for Your Dog
Medicine that might be completely normal for you to take when you have a cold could actually be fatal for your furry friend. Both over-the-counter and prescription medication used to ease cold & flu-like symptoms contain ingredients that are dangerous for your pup and should be kept out of paw’s reach.

Ingredients That Are Deadly for pets
If your canine companion consumes medicine that contains any of these ingredients, you should seek medical attention immediately:

Sudafed
Entex
Comtrex
Dristan Cold
Tavist
Contac
Tylenol Cold
Theraflu
Sinarest
Triaminicin
Drixoral
Nyquil
Acetaminophen
Ibuprofen
Pseudoephedrine
It’s important to point out, though, that this is a comprehensive list and that you should never give your canine medicine without consulting their veterinarian first.

What to Do if Your Pup Eats Cold or Flu Medicine
There are a variety of symptoms that your pooch could display after ingesting any of these ingredients. You might notice discolored gums, swollen face & paws, seizures, or a racing heart. Since the list of possible side effects is so wide, though, you should take your pet to the vet if you just suspect they consumed medicine with any of those ingredients. It’s better to be safe and precautions than wait for the side effects to begin; by then, it could be too late. So, once again, always err on the side of caution.

Tips for Keeping Medicine Out of Paw’s Reach
The best thing you can do for your pooch is to be proactive by ensuring they can’t get into your medicine to even begin with.

Whenever you’re not using a medication, make sure it is sealed.
Store your medication out of paw’s reach in a cabinet or drawer.
If you spill any medicine, be sure to clean it up right away and dispose of it securely in a garbage bin (if you can throw it away in a bin outside, even better)

Quick Reply

Latest