The Student Room Group

A level geography

I haven’t done GCSE geography, but I find that it’s quite common sense, I want to do medicine so want a 3rd subject that is less content heavy and more manageable, is geography under that?

Is geography a level really hard, some say it’s really boring, I don’t mind if it’s boring I just need the A*

How many people get As or A* do people generally find it easy?

Also I heard about this coursework they have to do? Could you please tell me a bit about that too

Thanks :smile:
Original post by og-iconx
I haven’t done GCSE geography, but I find that it’s quite common sense, I want to do medicine so want a 3rd subject that is less content heavy and more manageable, is geography under that?

Is geography a level really hard, some say it’s really boring, I don’t mind if it’s boring I just need the A*

How many people get As or A* do people generally find it easy?

Also I heard about this coursework they have to do? Could you please tell me a bit about that too

Thanks :smile:


In all honesty, if you're already thinking about an 'easy' route to studying Medicine then you're probably not going to be able to cope with studying Medicine. Contact the medical colleges. Ask them what they're looking for. You'll find the courses crammed with people who studied maths, chemistry, physics and biology. There won't be many 'easy' subjects in sight.

I'm not trying to be unkind, just honest.
Reply 2
Original post by NJBSaidit
In all honesty, if you're already thinking about an 'easy' route to studying Medicine then you're probably not going to be able to cope with studying Medicine. Contact the medical colleges. Ask them what they're looking for. You'll find the courses crammed with people who studied maths, chemistry, physics and biology. There won't be many 'easy' subjects in sight.

I'm not trying to be unkind, just honest.

Not is fine :smile: the thing is as my 3rd subject I don’t want maths or physics as that’ll just stress me out and I want to get A*s, what I mean is, my 3 rd subject want it to be something more manageable like geography as I’ll enjoy it too
Original post by og-iconx
I haven’t done GCSE geography, but I find that it’s quite common sense, I want to do medicine so want a 3rd subject that is less content heavy and more manageable, is geography under that?

Is geography a level really hard, some say it’s really boring, I don’t mind if it’s boring I just need the A*

How many people get As or A* do people generally find it easy?

Also I heard about this coursework they have to do? Could you please tell me a bit about that too

Thanks :smile:


My son's experience of the geography coursework (known as the NEA (non-examined assessment)) was to conduct some fieldwork over a couple of days to test a hypothesis, analyse the data (including statistical tests), write it up, etc. He had the choice of a physical or human geog topic. The NEA accounts for 20% of an A level, so it's a nice chunk to get out of the way before exams. How interesting you will find the course is hard to say. My son enjoyed it (the only A level he did enjoy in the end). Have a look through the syllabus if you know which exam board you would be taking.

Another subject you could consider is psychology. Perhaps more relevant to medicine (but that doesn't matter if the med schools you are considering applying to only want two sciences at A level) and again a subject you can do without having the GCSE. My daughter really enjoys psychology.
Original post by og-iconx
Not is fine :smile: the thing is as my 3rd subject I don’t want maths or physics as that’ll just stress me out and I want to get A*s, what I mean is, my 3 rd subject want it to be something more manageable like geography as I’ll enjoy it too


So are you looking to study me Medicine or not?

As I said, you'll be competing against a very, very qualified group of applicants. They will have A-levels in Chemistry and Physics at least. Many take biology, too, because that is actually the most relevant, particularly human biology. But A-level Chemistry is an absolute must, otherwise medical schools won't touch you.

It's not that there's a massive amount of chemistry in medical degrees - it's more an unofficial IQ test (I'm not joking, by the way). It's common knowledge amongst the education world (what's left of the honest part of it, anyway) that maths, chemistry and physics are the most difficult subjects at A-level. Studies have stated chemistry is the hardest A-level. When was the last time you met someone who's stupid and lazy but who's studied all three at A-level and had good marks? The answer is never. That's why medical schools want them: they know those people will be up to the mark academically.

Whether their personality is suitable is a different matter. But we're talking about the academic element.
Original post by NJBSaidit
So are you looking to study me Medicine or not?

As I said, you'll be competing against a very, very qualified group of applicants. They will have A-levels in Chemistry and Physics at least. Many take biology, too, because that is actually the most relevant, particularly human biology. But A-level Chemistry is an absolute must, otherwise medical schools won't touch you.

It's not that there's a massive amount of chemistry in medical degrees - it's more an unofficial IQ test (I'm not joking, by the way). It's common knowledge amongst the education world (what's left of the honest part of it, anyway) that maths, chemistry and physics are the most difficult subjects at A-level. Studies have stated chemistry is the hardest A-level. When was the last time you met someone who's stupid and lazy but who's studied all three at A-level and had good marks? The answer is never. That's why medical schools want them: they know those people will be up to the mark academically.

Whether their personality is suitable is a different matter. But we're talking about the academic element.


chemistry is needed for most, and bio at some but physics is pretty rare for med applicants. there's no need to do a third stem subject, it won't increase your chances
Original post by NJBSaidit
So are you looking to study me Medicine or not?

As I said, you'll be competing against a very, very qualified group of applicants. They will have A-levels in Chemistry and Physics at least. Many take biology, too, because that is actually the most relevant, particularly human biology. But A-level Chemistry is an absolute must, otherwise medical schools won't touch you.

It's not that there's a massive amount of chemistry in medical degrees - it's more an unofficial IQ test (I'm not joking, by the way). It's common knowledge amongst the education world (what's left of the honest part of it, anyway) that maths, chemistry and physics are the most difficult subjects at A-level. Studies have stated chemistry is the hardest A-level. When was the last time you met someone who's stupid and lazy but who's studied all three at A-level and had good marks? The answer is never. That's why medical schools want them: they know those people will be up to the mark academically.

Whether their personality is suitable is a different matter. But we're talking about the academic element.


As @jonah1014 has said, most medical schools require two sciences (usually biol and chem) plus one other subject - read this thread:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=5611422

Physics is NOT necessary.
Original post by normaw
As @jonah1014 has said, most medical schools require two sciences (usually biol and chem) plus one other subject - read this thread:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=5611422

Physics is NOT necessary.


No, it's not necessary. But if you wanted to maximise your chances, do the most difficult subjects. Anyway. I'm not even sure the OP wants to study medicine so it's not an issue.
Original post by jonah1014
chemistry is needed for most, and bio at some but physics is pretty rare for med applicants. there's no need to do a third stem subject, it won't increase your chances

Yep, chemistry is the most difficult subject and that's the main one they want. The people from my school and college who went to med school all had chemistry and physics. None of them actually did biology at A-level. That was a few years ago, though, and university is not what is was.

My intention in replying to the OP originally was to make him or her aware that there is no 'easy' way to med school. If someone is already thinking of easy ways into a particular career then maybe that's a sign it's not for that person.
Reply 9
Original post by NJBSaidit
So are you looking to study me Medicine or not?

As I said, you'll be competing against a very, very qualified group of applicants. They will have A-levels in Chemistry and Physics at least. Many take biology, too, because that is actually the most relevant, particularly human biology. But A-level Chemistry is an absolute must, otherwise medical schools won't touch you.

It's not that there's a massive amount of chemistry in medical degrees - it's more an unofficial IQ test (I'm not joking, by the way). It's common knowledge amongst the education world (what's left of the honest part of it, anyway) that maths, chemistry and physics are the most difficult subjects at A-level. Studies have stated chemistry is the hardest A-level. When was the last time you met someone who's stupid and lazy but who's studied all three at A-level and had good marks? The answer is never. That's why medical schools want them: they know those people will be up to the mark academically.

Whether their personality is suitable is a different matter. But we're talking about the academic element.


Only some university require physics or maths as third subject, Im doing Biology, Chemistry, and 3rd subject which is more manageable, why would I put all the stress in doing Physics or Maths with it as universities I’m applying to don’t require it, I’ve done my research as long as it’s an A or A* they don’t really care what subject it is
Reply 10
Original post by NJBSaidit
Yep, chemistry is the most difficult subject and that's the main one they want. The people from my school and college who went to med school all had chemistry and physics. None of them actually did biology at A-level. That was a few years ago, though, and university is not what is was.

My intention in replying to the OP originally was to make him or her aware that there is no 'easy' way to med school. If someone is already thinking of easy ways into a particular career then maybe that's a sign it's not for that person

You don’t get the point, I’m not trying to find an easy way into medicine, I want to do a 3rd a level which I will enjoy the most as the only subjects I really enjoy are Biology and Chemistry, Physics and Maths I get 8s in but don’t particularly enjoy them.

It’s about maximising your chances of getting good grades, by doing geography which seems less content heavy, I can focus more on Biology and Chemistry and get A*s in it!

I could do physics and maths but what’s the point if the universities aren’t going to increase your chances of getting in with it, they are regarded as the ‘hardest’ a level subject, and I simply don’t want to take on the stress and I have to sit the UCAT etc, with this I can start focusing bits on the UCAT early and get a Band 1 in it
Original post by NJBSaidit
But if you wanted to maximise your chances, do the most difficult subjects.


That is just not true. Universities are open about what subjects they want for a particular course. So if a uni states that they want bio and chem and any other A level, they mean it.
Original post by og-iconx
I haven’t done GCSE geography, but I find that it’s quite common sense, I want to do medicine so want a 3rd subject that is less content heavy and more manageable, is geography under that?

Is geography a level really hard, some say it’s really boring, I don’t mind if it’s boring I just need the A*

How many people get As or A* do people generally find it easy?

Also I heard about this coursework they have to do? Could you please tell me a bit about that too

Thanks :smile:

Heya!
I would recommend having a look at the content of geography a-levels and possibly finding some review videos on it YT (they usually talk about it in more detail) :h: I haven't personally done geography but I had a friend who did and he found it enjoyable (though he also did it for GCSE). It might be a bit different compared to what you are used to but you could try it out. If you don't enjoy it early then you can swap the a-level. The popular choice for medicine's 3rd subject is psychology if it helps! Personally, I would recommend looking into economics as an option too if you are interested, I did it alongside chem and bio and found it very interesting! If you need future help with sciences, check out Study Mind for free past papers and revision notes!

I hope this helps!
Milena
UCL PFE
Study Mind
Original post by normaw
That is just not true. Universities are open about what subjects they want for a particular course. So if a uni states that they want bio and chem and any other A level, they mean it.


As I said, uni is not what it used to be. Maybe the OP should do Media Studies as a third subject. After all, it doesn't matter.
Original post by og-iconx
You don’t get the point, I’m not trying to find an easy way into medicine, I want to do a 3rd a level which I will enjoy the most as the only subjects I really enjoy are Biology and Chemistry, Physics and Maths I get 8s in but don’t particularly enjoy them.

It’s about maximising your chances of getting good grades, by doing geography which seems less content heavy, I can focus more on Biology and Chemistry and get A*s in it!

I could do physics and maths but what’s the point if the universities aren’t going to increase your chances of getting in with it, they are regarded as the ‘hardest’ a level subject, and I simply don’t want to take on the stress and I have to sit the UCAT etc, with this I can start focusing bits on the UCAT early and get a Band 1 in it

Honestly, I do know what you mean. But my point is that if you're stressed out about the workload of doing three hard A-levels how are you going to cope with the workload of a medical degree? I'm really not trying to be nasty or insulting. I know people who did the medical degree and they were all the best of the best throughout school. They found it really tough.

I'm going to sound like some real old pub bore here. But...in my day (mid - to late-90s)...people did the hard A-levels because they knew it was a marker of what they could achieve. They didn't actually enjoy all three, particularly things like maths and physics. But they did it and kept working at it because it was only an expedient. It also gave them an idea if they could cope with the sheer volume of work a medical degree entails. This was also true of those who went on to do pharmacy, dentistry and veterinary medicine.

I'll go back to my original point. Do you really want to do a medical degree or do you just like the idea of it? Would you gain the same satisfaction in a career related to medicine? I'm not saying you don't have the ability to be a good doctor. But being a doctor is not a walk in the park. Training to be a doctor is hell on earth, and you need to be sure you are ready for it.

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