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Bad grades, depression, dw motivation and autism?

Im currently in year 13 and I always get rlly bad grades D/Cs so today I got back my mock tests for sociology and I got a C, I also got C in AS level. I was rlly disappointed since I revised 2 hours everyday for the past month and I thought I understood it and was expecting atleast a C, I’m rlly depressed abt this and idk what’s wrong with me. I think I have autism or dyslexia bc I have many of the symptoms, there is just no explanation to why I am unlike everyone else and it’s rlly affecting me. I can’t take a real test for Asperger’s syndrome due to my culture its kinda not rlly believed in I guess and I can’t tell my parents about it. I took an online test which suggested I should take a real one because my ‘whatever’ levels were different from a ‘normal’ human. I think it would rlly explain my whole life and why I am like how I am. I am just so upset and keep crying over my grades and how dumb I am. I wish I could take a test bc that would help me get the help I need. I have an offer too from a uni which I rlly want to go to but due to all this idk if I’ll even get in or meet the requirements.
Original post by Anonymous
Im currently in year 13 and I always get rlly bad grades D/Cs so today I got back my mock tests for sociology and I got a C, I also got C in AS level. I was rlly disappointed since I revised 2 hours everyday for the past month and I thought I understood it and was expecting atleast a C, I’m rlly depressed abt this and idk what’s wrong with me. I think I have autism or dyslexia bc I have many of the symptoms, there is just no explanation to why I am unlike everyone else and it’s rlly affecting me. I can’t take a real test for Asperger’s syndrome due to my culture its kinda not rlly believed in I guess and I can’t tell my parents about it. I took an online test which suggested I should take a real one because my ‘whatever’ levels were different from a ‘normal’ human. I think it would rlly explain my whole life and why I am like how I am. I am just so upset and keep crying over my grades and how dumb I am. I wish I could take a test bc that would help me get the help I need. I have an offer too from a uni which I rlly want to go to but due to all this idk if I’ll even get in or meet the requirements.


Was expecting atleast a B I meant to say
https://aspietests.org/ try them and then maybe just talk to your GP on your own.
Original post by Bernard_Lowe
https://aspietests.org/ try them and then maybe just talk to your GP on your own.


I am 17 so I think I am still able to book a gp appointment on my own, however I have never done it I don’t even know the name of my doctor or how I would get to the gp, my family is kinda strict so I’m not just allowed to spontaneously go out. Thanks for trying to help tho
Original post by Anonymous
I am 17 so I think I am still able to book a gp appointment on my own, however I have never done it I don’t even know the name of my doctor or how I would get to the gp, my family is kinda strict so I’m not just allowed to spontaneously go out. Thanks for trying to help tho


Try a random nearby walk in clinic, they should b able e to pass you o the correct place.
Being gutted about not getting the grades you hoped for is not inherently bad, but if it is making you upset to the point you want to cry about it and making you feel dumb. then it's a problem. Plus C isn't even that bad, its a pass. But grades are just a measure of how well youre doing in school, they don't determine who you are.
Original post by Anonymous
Being gutted about not getting the grades you hoped for is not inherently bad, but if it is making you upset to the point you want to cry about it and making you feel dumb. then it's a problem. Plus C isn't even that bad, its a pass. But grades are just a measure of how well youre doing in school, they don't determine who you are.


Yea I don’t think a C is that bad, but it’s the fact I revised so hard and I got a C last year which shows I’m not improving, if I continue like this I definitely won’t get into my dream course :/
Original post by Anonymous
Yea I don’t think a C is that bad, but it’s the fact I revised so hard and I got a C last year which shows I’m not improving, if I continue like this I definitely won’t get into my dream course :/


You've tried your best so that's all that matters even if the grade isn't bad and you don't get on your dream course which is temporary. As long as you try your best you'll be fine because even if you do it get on your dream course, you'll pass the course, graduate whatever then you might struggle to get a job with in whatever field you want coz it's competitive. Just try your best, maybe find a back up plan and you'll be fine. It's not like if you don't get the right grades it's over.
Good luck with getting diagnosed. Have you talked to your teachers about whether you'd be eligible for extra time or for alternative test taking methods? (I know people who do written exams on laptops instead of by hand) Has anyone presented options outside of university to you? Not everyone is suited to academia - and that's not anything to be ashamed of or embarrased by at all. Might be liberating for you to embrace the idea that the way to make the most of yourself might be an apprenticeship or something vocational. Best of luck!
Original post by skullgunk04
Good luck with getting diagnosed. Have you talked to your teachers about whether you'd be eligible for extra time or for alternative test taking methods? (I know people who do written exams on laptops instead of by hand) Has anyone presented options outside of university to you? Not everyone is suited to academia - and that's not anything to be ashamed of or embarrased by at all. Might be liberating for you to embrace the idea that the way to make the most of yourself might be an apprenticeship or something vocational. Best of luck!


Yea I have talked to my teachers abt extra time but it’s still being assessed for me, the course I want to do in uni is 50% more placement work and I wish I did choose a btec for a level but I’m in year 13 so there’s not much point to going back now
Original post by Anonymous
Yea I have talked to my teachers abt extra time but it’s still being assessed for me, the course I want to do in uni is 50% more placement work and I wish I did choose a btec for a level but I’m in year 13 so there’s not much point to going back now

There's even less point in wasting thousands if your degree isn't something that really speaks to you. You could take a year out and take a btec or something, then apply next year. Entirely your decision, but don't forget that there's more than one option for further education. What is it you're looking to go on to do?
Original post by skullgunk04
There's even less point in wasting thousands if your degree isn't something that really speaks to you. You could take a year out and take a btec or something, then apply next year. Entirely your decision, but don't forget that there's more than one option for further education. What is it you're looking to go on to do?


But the degree I want to do I am strongly passionate about it, I also don’t hate my subjects now either, I’m just stuck on Cs and I’m worried about not meeting the minimum requirement grades. And i want to do midwifery.
Original post by Anonymous
But the degree I want to do I am strongly passionate about it, I also don’t hate my subjects now either, I’m just stuck on Cs and I’m worried about not meeting the minimum requirement grades. And i want to do midwifery.

Just keep trying your best mate
Look at the DSM-V criteria for autism. It's widely misunderstood, as the sensory stuff is just one of the seven criteria.

Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, as manifested by the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive; see text):

Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, ranging, for example, from abnormal social approach and failure of normal back-and-forth conversation; to reduced sharing of interests, emotions, or affect; to failure to initiate or respond to social interactions.

Deficits in nonverbal communicative behaviors used for social interaction, ranging, for example, from poorly integrated verbal and nonverbal communication; to abnormalities in eye contact and body language or deficits in understanding and use of gestures; to a total lack of facial expressions and nonverbal communication.

Deficits in developing, maintaining, and understanding relationships, ranging, for example, from difficulties adjusting behavior to suit various social contexts; to difficulties in sharing imaginative play or in making friends; to absence of interest in peers.


Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities, as manifested by at least two of the following, currently or by history (examples are illustrative, not exhaustive; see text):

Stereotyped or repetitive motor movements, use of objects, or speech (e.g., simple motor stereotypes, lining up toys or flipping objects, echolalia, idiosyncratic phrases).

Insistence on sameness, inflexible adherence to routines, or ritualized patterns of verbal or nonverbal behavior (e.g., extreme distress at small changes, difficulties with transitions, rigid thinking patterns, greeting rituals, need to take same route or eat same food every day).

Highly restricted, fixated interests that are abnormal in intensity or focus (e.g., strong attachment to or preoccupation with unusual objects, excessively circumscribed or perseverative interests).

Hyper- or hyporeactivity to sensory input or unusual interest in sensory aspects of the environment (e.g. apparent indifference to pain/temperature, adverse response to specific sounds or textures, excessive smelling or touching of objects, visual fascination with lights or movement).


You need to meet the first 3 criteria and 2 of the last 4 criteria to have an ASD diagnosis. You can be referred through your GP or through school for an ASD assessment. It can also be assessed privately.
Original post by Anonymous
Just keep trying your best mate


Getting C at A level is not bad and with a bit of work you could get B or even A - I have seen it happen!. Your grades have nothing to do with your level of intelligence so stop calling yourself dumb. Good grades are about consistent hard work and technique. By simply reading and copying out your text books for 2 hours a day you will only achieve only a certain level. You must to try "Active Recall" which is allowing yourself time to forget and then trying to recall key concepts from memory. The best way is to constantly do Past Papers. This is by far the best way to improve your grades. You can also try recalling your topics by writing out mind maps or flash cards over time from memory until you recall the key points.
Original post by londonstudent002
Getting C at A level is not bad and with a bit of work you could get B or even A - I have seen it happen!. Your grades have nothing to do with your level of intelligence so stop calling yourself dumb. Good grades are about consistent hard work and technique. By simply reading and copying out your text books for 2 hours a day you will only achieve only a certain level. You must to try "Active Recall" which is allowing yourself time to forget and then trying to recall key concepts from memory. The best way is to constantly do Past Papers. This is by far the best way to improve your grades. You can also try recalling your topics by writing out mind maps or flash cards over time from memory until you recall the key points.


Thanks, I do active recall and many other techniques, and many past papers however I find my problem isn’t remembering the information in the exam as I remember it all. My problem tends to be mis interpreting things, I do it all the time and I always read and re read the question. Also I struggle applying the correct information even though I can remember everything in my head.
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks, I do active recall and many other techniques, and many past papers however I find my problem isn’t remembering the information in the exam as I remember it all. My problem tends to be mis interpreting things, I do it all the time and I always read and re read the question. Also I struggle applying the correct information even though I can remember everything in my head.


Maybe try an Educational Psychologist. They work for schools, colleges and privately too.
I have an ASD diagnosis (I was fully diagnoised in Y13). However when I got the referall letter I was allowed exam changes so even just being accepted for an assessment will help you get adjustments and the teachers might spend 1 on 1 time with you to help you with the parts that you struggle with. I would suggest talking to the school about it as during the assessment they will ask the school about concerns they have about you so them knowing the traits will help towards a diagnosis.
With the DSM 5 that is used in America but is still helpful for you to understand what traits are needed for a diagnosis the Uk one that is used by the NHS is

Diagnostic Requirements
Essential (Required) Features:
Persistent deficits in initiating and sustaining social communication and reciprocal social interactions that are outside the expected range of typical functioning given the individual’s age and level of intellectual development. Specific manifestations of these deficits vary according to chronological age, verbal and intellectual ability, and disorder severity. Manifestations may include limitations in the following
Understanding of, interest in, or inappropriate responses to the verbal or non-verbal social communications of others.

Integration of spoken language with typical complimentary non-verbal cues, such as eye contact, gestures, facial expressions and body language. These non-verbal behaviours may also be reduced in frequency or intensity.

Understanding and use of language in social contexts and ability to initiate and sustain reciprocal social conversations.
Social awareness, leading to behaviour that is not appropriately modulated according to the social context.

Ability to imagine and respond to the feelings, emotional states, and attitudes of others.

Mutual sharing of interests.

Ability to make and sustain typical peer relationships.

Persistent restricted, repetitive, and inflexible patterns of behaviour, interests, or activities that are clearly atypical or excessive for the individual’s age and sociocultural context. These may include:

Lack of adaptability to new experiences and circumstances, with associated distress, that can be evoked by trivial changes to a familiar environment or in response to unanticipated events.

Inflexible adherence to particular routines; for example, these may be geographic such as following familiar routes, or may require precise timing such as mealtimes or transport.

Excessive adherence to rules (e.g., when playing games).

Excessive and persistent ritualized patterns of behaviour (e.g., preoccupation with lining up or sorting objects in a particular way) that serve no apparent external purpose.

Repetitive and stereotyped motor movements, such as whole body movements (e.g., rocking), atypical gait (e.g., walking on tiptoes), unusual hand or finger movements and posturing. These behaviours are particularly common during early childhood.
Persistent preoccupation with one or more special interests, parts of objects, or specific types of stimuli (including media) or an unusually strong attachment to particular objects (excluding typical comforters).

Lifelong excessive and persistent hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity to sensory stimuli or unusual interest in a sensory stimulus, which may include actual or anticipated sounds, light, textures (especially clothing and food), odors and tastes, heat, cold, or pain.

The onset of the disorder occurs during the developmental period, typically in early childhood, but characteristic symptoms may not become fully manifest until later, when social demands exceed limited capacities.

The symptoms result in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning. Some individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder are able to function adequately in many contexts through exceptional effort, such that their deficits may not be apparent to others. A diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder is still appropriate in such cases.


I hope this helps, also I'm not sure how many from each section you need to have to be diagnoised unfortunatley
Would you be able to talk to a school counsellor or something? They might be able to help you with taking the exam in a separate room if you think that may be helpful. I know some people that went through this "unofficial" route, but it also might depend on school policies. I also had a lot of trouble with misunderstanding the questions and it was really frustrating. What helped me a lot is doing lots of past papers and checking through the mark scheme. The types of questions they ask at A Level are quite repetitive so you start getting the hang of what they probably want to see. If I have time in the exam, I sometimes just start writing out basically all I know about a question if I'm not sure what it's asking for.



I hope this helps!
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks, I do active recall and many other techniques, and many past papers however I find my problem isn’t remembering the information in the exam as I remember it all. My problem tends to be mis interpreting things, I do it all the time and I always read and re read the question. Also I struggle applying the correct information even though I can remember everything in my head.

So you're missing marks because your answers don't match what the mark scheme wants?

Look at the mark schemes and question papers (and exemplars) for the past papers you've done and try to find similarities between question wordings and the type of information they want. Many questions are repeated in similar forms. Also explain this to your teachers and ask for strategies on deducing what kind of answer/information the question wants.

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