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biopsych fight/flight response

how much of the fight/flight response do you need to know for aqa a-level psychology? like do you need to know each step involved in the short & long-term fight & flight responses or just the generals?
Original post by spammbo
how much of the fight/flight response do you need to know for aqa a-level psychology? like do you need to know each step involved in the short & long-term fight & flight responses or just the generals?

Hey there,

I am in Y13 and take AQA Psychology too! As far as I am aware, you need to know the following:

- that the Endocrine System and the ANS (Autonomic Nervous System) work together for fight or flight (FoF)
- What a stressor is (the thing causing the FoF response)
- When stressor is perceived, hypothalamus (in the brain) activates the pituitary gland and triggers activity of the sympathetic branch of ANS. Parasympathetic branch restores body to normal resting levels, whereas sympathetic branch prepares body (psychologically arouse) for FoF.
- Adrenaline (stress hormone) is released into bloodstream from adrenal medulla, causing physiological changes (such as pupil dilation, faster heart rate, stomach contracts slower etc)
- Basically, non-essential body functions shut down..
- This happens as soon as threat detected, = "acute response".
- Once threat has passed, parasympathetic action kicks in, returning body to resting levels (pupils contract, digestive processes continue to occur, heart rate decreases etc)
- The parasympathetic and sympathetic systems work antagonistically.
- "Stress" is a biological coping mechanism designed to aid survival.

...And that is everything! phew- I hope this helps :smile:
Reply 2
Original post by Noor Yousuf
Hey there,

I am in Y13 and take AQA Psychology too! As far as I am aware, you need to know the following:

- that the Endocrine System and the ANS (Autonomic Nervous System) work together for fight or flight (FoF)
- What a stressor is (the thing causing the FoF response)
- When stressor is perceived, hypothalamus (in the brain) activates the pituitary gland and triggers activity of the sympathetic branch of ANS. Parasympathetic branch restores body to normal resting levels, whereas sympathetic branch prepares body (psychologically arouse) for FoF.
- Adrenaline (stress hormone) is released into bloodstream from adrenal medulla, causing physiological changes (such as pupil dilation, faster heart rate, stomach contracts slower etc)
- Basically, non-essential body functions shut down..
- This happens as soon as threat detected, = "acute response".
- Once threat has passed, parasympathetic action kicks in, returning body to resting levels (pupils contract, digestive processes continue to occur, heart rate decreases etc)
- The parasympathetic and sympathetic systems work antagonistically.
- "Stress" is a biological coping mechanism designed to aid survival.

...And that is everything! phew- I hope this helps :smile:


oh my god thank you so much ! you're an actual legend mate, thanks :biggrin:

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