The Student Room Group

Geography NEA

Hi guys, I have put off my nea for months and i am only starting now :'( Does anyone have a rough timescale of how long it took them? I am only aiming for a B at best, thanks ( also please say that someone else is in the same situation as me)
I started mine in October of Year 13 if that helps, and did my data collection mid-November - i think it was handed in around April time?
Original post by laureng3
Hi guys, I have put off my nea for months and i am only starting now :'( Does anyone have a rough timescale of how long it took them? I am only aiming for a B at best, thanks ( also please say that someone else is in the same situation as me)

yeah i am just starting now too !! our teacher made us hand in the plans ages ago but mine is really bad but idk if it's too late to change it all now?? what were you thinking of doing it on
Reply 3
I started planning mine in the spring term of year 12 around February / March, did the literature review and research about methods after year 12 mocks in May and June, and then collected by data during the summer holidays. I made as many graphs and charts and my statistical analysis in August, ready to begin writing my methods and results discussion, analysis, conclusion and then any references / formatting etc for a first draft due after the Christmas holidays in Year 13 from my school. In total the process from very start to final submission took a year.
Original post by Ðeggs
I started planning mine in the spring term of year 12 around February / March, did the literature review and research about methods after year 12 mocks in May and June, and then collected by data during the summer holidays. I made as many graphs and charts and my statistical analysis in August, ready to begin writing my methods and results discussion, analysis, conclusion and then any references / formatting etc for a first draft due after the Christmas holidays in Year 13 from my school. In total the process from very start to final submission took a year.

Hi!

How did it go overall after you finished, if you don't mind me asking? Do you have some tips on how to write a good introduction too?
Reply 5
Original post by Comingtotalk
Hi!

How did it go overall after you finished, if you don't mind me asking? Do you have some tips on how to write a good introduction too?


Of course! I received 60/60 full marks in my NEA. In your introduction try and include a brief overview of each of the different chapters / sections you plan to include.
- What is your investigation about? What are you investigating? How does it link to the specification of your exam board e.g "Topic 1.2C Catchment Hydrology and the Water Cycle" or "Changing places: rebranding and gentrification".
- What are your hypotheses and predictions? and most importantly what are your Key Questions Explicitly write them down, make them SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time- manageable / time appropriate)
- What sources or literatures / models will you use: e.g. I will explain Doreen Massey's theory about sense of place and how we come to experience different places, or I will use the Bradshaw model to explain changes in sediment size and river discharge along the source of a river for example.
- Where are you basing your investigation? In the river of X or the town of Y, I would provide two maps on different scales, one at a local scale and one at a regional scale.
- What methodological approach are you using? Quantitative data in physical geography -> measurements, recording soil erosion rates, size of pebbles, an estimate for the amount of carbon in trees etc, Qualitative data in human geography -> different senses or emotions, historical data or old maps, ethnographic approaches like participant observation, interviews, surveys and questionnaires etc. Also don't forget to take a lot photographs and annotate them!
- What type of data will you collect and how will you present this "I plan to interview X amount of people on topics Y and Z, presenting this data in a pie chart, line graph, spearman's rank correlation or whatever it might be.
- And finally, Why and what for - what do you hope to achieve from your investigation? What could your investigation contribute towards geographical literature? Chances are it won't (lol) but you should write about 1 or 2 sentences for example "I am testing whether the Bradshaw model can apply to smaller rivers" or "I am applying Doreen Massey's theory of sense of place to a small area of X or area Y, known for high crime rates and poverty..."
- And if you're aiming for full marks and want to impress or study a social sciences / humanities degree, think about what theoretical approaches you are using. Is your investigation based on realism and interpreting quantitative data, or is it more social constructionist and interpreting / debating potentially conflicting theories and informations and up to multiple different interpretations. (This isn't necessary but why not think academically and towards degree level?)
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by Ðeggs
Of course! I received 60/60 full marks in my NEA. In your introduction try and include a brief overview of each of the different chapters / sections you plan to include.
- What is your investigation about? What are you investigating? How does it link to the specification of your exam board e.g "Topic 1.2C Catchment Hydrology and the Water Cycle" or "Changing places: rebranding and gentrification".
- What are your hypotheses and predictions? and most importantly what are your Key Questions Explicitly write them down, make them SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time- manageable / time appropriate)
- What sources or literatures / models will you use: e.g. I will explain Doreen Massey's theory about sense of place and how we come to experience different places, or I will use the Bradshaw model to explain changes in sediment size and river discharge along the source of a river for example.
- Where are you basing your investigation? In the river of X or the town of Y, I would provide two maps on different scales, one at a local scale and one at a regional scale.
- What methodological approach are you using? Quantitative data in physical geography -> measurements, recording soil erosion rates, size of pebbles, an estimate for the amount of carbon in trees etc, Qualitative data in human geography -> different senses or emotions, historical data or old maps, ethnographic approaches like participant observation, interviews, surveys and questionnaires etc. Also don't forget to take a lot photographs and annotate them!
- What type of data will you collect and how will you present this "I plan to interview X amount of people on topics Y and Z, presenting this data in a pie chart, line graph, spearman's rank correlation or whatever it might be.
- And finally, Why and what for - what do you hope to achieve from your investigation? What could your investigation contribute towards geographical literature? Chances are it won't (lol) but you should write about 1 or 2 sentences for example "I am testing whether the Bradshaw model can apply to smaller rivers" or "I am applying Doreen Massey's theory of sense of place to a small area of X or area Y, known for high crime rates and poverty..."
- And if you're aiming for full marks and want to impress or study a social sciences / humanities degree, think about what theoretical approaches you are using. Is your investigation based on realism and interpreting quantitative data, or is it more social constructionist and interpreting / debating potentially conflicting theories and informations and up to multiple different interpretations. (This isn't necessary but why not think academically and towards degree level?)

Thank you so much!! I didn't expect such a detailed reply and I appreciate your help all the more for that!! I was really struggling with my introduction so these prompts will be life savers!

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