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regretting not doing a-level maths

I can't help but feel unsure about not taking maths. At the time of picking a-levels, I was told over and again to just pick subjects I enjoyed and that I thought I would be good at, so I picked english lit, politics and history, thinking any degree/career choices would just follow. I was fairly confident about wanting to do law, but apart from that I had no idea of what path I wanted to go down.

Now, I still think I want to do law, but I'm fairly anxious about the lack of alternatives. My subjects have realistically limited me to something humanities/law based and not much else. (on the bright side, they're all respected subjects). If I had just done maths, I could've opened up so many doors, especially to higher-paying degrees like business management etc.

The problem is that, for the most part I didn't really enjoy maths and struggled with it for a long time, but once I put some work in (and with a little bit of emergency tutoring) I went from getting 6's to an 8 in the actual GCSE. I'm sure that I could've gotten a good grade - I got 8's and 9's in all the subjects I didn't enjoy, and probably could've pushed through with maths a-level also - there's loads of people who don't love their subjects, but still work hard and succeed to go on to do what they want at Uni.

Someone told me at the time while choosing A-levels that I'd need maths for anything in life, and I wasn't bothered, since I was initially really confident about not taking maths, telling myself that a low grade in maths would've been less useful than a high grade in a different subject, but now I'm reconsidering my decision. At this point, frantically trying to change subject would probably do more harm than good, but I still feel so stuck, it feels pointless stressing about something that is probably already too late to change. I don't want to end up with a rubbish degree/job simply because I was too lazy to take maths.
Original post by waterenjoyer
I can't help but feel unsure about not taking maths. At the time of picking a-levels, I was told over and again to just pick subjects I enjoyed and that I thought I would be good at, so I picked english lit, politics and history, thinking any degree/career choices would just follow. I was fairly confident about wanting to do law, but apart from that I had no idea of what path I wanted to go down.

Now, I still think I want to do law, but I'm fairly anxious about the lack of alternatives. My subjects have realistically limited me to something humanities/law based and not much else. (on the bright side, they're all respected subjects). If I had just done maths, I could've opened up so many doors, especially to higher-paying degrees like business management etc.

The problem is that, for the most part I didn't really enjoy maths and struggled with it for a long time, but once I put some work in (and with a little bit of emergency tutoring) I went from getting 6's to an 8 in the actual GCSE. I'm sure that I could've gotten a good grade - I got 8's and 9's in all the subjects I didn't enjoy, and probably could've pushed through with maths a-level also - there's loads of people who don't love their subjects, but still work hard and succeed to go on to do what they want at Uni.

Someone told me at the time while choosing A-levels that I'd need maths for anything in life, and I wasn't bothered, since I was initially really confident about not taking maths, telling myself that a low grade in maths would've been less useful than a high grade in a different subject, but now I'm reconsidering my decision. At this point, frantically trying to change subject would probably do more harm than good, but I still feel so stuck, it feels pointless stressing about something that is probably already too late to change. I don't want to end up with a rubbish degree/job simply because I was too lazy to take maths.

That’s a tricky one- I completely understand where you are coming from. I’m in year 12 atm and doing maths. Maths was my favourite subject at GCSE and got a high grade 9 in it. Honestly I am finding it pretty chill at the moment- but it is most certainly a step up from GCSE. Some of the topics are exactly the same as GCSE (surds and indices topic), some are chill (proofs) and some take a second to understand (logs, etc). If you really feel like you want to do maths and are willing to put the effort in, maybe have a chat with your form tutor or head of sixth form and discuss the logistics. You could always try to catch up on the content that they have covered so far and then ask if you can go to the lessons for a week or two (kind of as a fourth a level) to see if it’s right for you.
(edited 1 year ago)
I did A level maths despite not enjoying GCSE because I wanted to do computer science at uni. I got an 8 at GCSE though.

A level maths turned out to be the most difficult, unenjoyable, and generally terrible A level I could've done. I just scraped a C and revising for that took my other A levels down with it.

I never ended up doing computer science by the way.

I'd say you dodged a bullet
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 3
Yeah I wish I did maths too.
Reply 4
Original post by minstrat1_
Yeah I wish I did maths too.

I wish that I didn't do maths
Reply 5
Original post by waterenjoyer
I can't help but feel unsure about not taking maths. At the time of picking a-levels, I was told over and again to just pick subjects I enjoyed and that I thought I would be good at, so I picked english lit, politics and history, thinking any degree/career choices would just follow. I was fairly confident about wanting to do law, but apart from that I had no idea of what path I wanted to go down.

Now, I still think I want to do law, but I'm fairly anxious about the lack of alternatives. My subjects have realistically limited me to something humanities/law based and not much else. (on the bright side, they're all respected subjects). If I had just done maths, I could've opened up so many doors, especially to higher-paying degrees like business management etc.

The problem is that, for the most part I didn't really enjoy maths and struggled with it for a long time, but once I put some work in (and with a little bit of emergency tutoring) I went from getting 6's to an 8 in the actual GCSE. I'm sure that I could've gotten a good grade - I got 8's and 9's in all the subjects I didn't enjoy, and probably could've pushed through with maths a-level also - there's loads of people who don't love their subjects, but still work hard and succeed to go on to do what they want at Uni.

Someone told me at the time while choosing A-levels that I'd need maths for anything in life, and I wasn't bothered, since I was initially really confident about not taking maths, telling myself that a low grade in maths would've been less useful than a high grade in a different subject, but now I'm reconsidering my decision. At this point, frantically trying to change subject would probably do more harm than good, but I still feel so stuck, it feels pointless stressing about something that is probably already too late to change. I don't want to end up with a rubbish degree/job simply because I was too lazy to take maths.


hey i wouldn't stress too much about this - just try to think about the fact that would enjoy your subjects so much you want to take law!

while maths does open up other opportunities - consider whether you would enjoy taking it and enjoy spending your entire life doing a maths based career after a 3/4 year degree also based on maths.

for me i originally wanted to take a subject opposite to what i want to now. what made me change my mind was the that the thought of studying my new subject really excited me and when i was studying i genuinely enjoyed it and wanted to do this further. however, when i thought about studying the other subject i honestly thought i would become bored taking it.

i would say try not to regret the past and decisions you cant change now and instead try to look to the future as you can make bank with a law degree as well.

yes - you can make a lot of money with business and other maths based degrees but you are in the same position with law. it can be a very high paying degree and if you enjoy it thats amazing!

also consider that there is a big step up from gcse maths to a level maths. during gcses maths was my 'easy' subject where i didnt really have to revise much in order to get a 9. however, now i have had to work really hard in order to get predicted an A*. however at the start of the year i was probably working at a grade C level so i did have to work hard in order to get this grade. but i was willing to do so because maths has always been one of my favourite subjects and i enjoy putting in the work and doing practise questions.

if you were struggling with gcse maths i would honestly say you dodged a bullet as it is a big step up from this in my opinion.

hope this helps! dont worry about the past just try and think about the future (easier said than done ofc) but i wouldn't regret your decision.

maybe start by making a vision board and looking at law courses and hopefully this will help you realise you have made a good choice for you and show you that you will be happy in your job as law is by no means a low paying degree.
Reply 6
Original post by waterenjoyer
I can't help but feel unsure about not taking maths. At the time of picking a-levels, I was told over and again to just pick subjects I enjoyed and that I thought I would be good at, so I picked english lit, politics and history, thinking any degree/career choices would just follow. I was fairly confident about wanting to do law, but apart from that I had no idea of what path I wanted to go down.

Now, I still think I want to do law, but I'm fairly anxious about the lack of alternatives. My subjects have realistically limited me to something humanities/law based and not much else. (on the bright side, they're all respected subjects). If I had just done maths, I could've opened up so many doors, especially to higher-paying degrees like business management etc.

The problem is that, for the most part I didn't really enjoy maths and struggled with it for a long time, but once I put some work in (and with a little bit of emergency tutoring) I went from getting 6's to an 8 in the actual GCSE. I'm sure that I could've gotten a good grade - I got 8's and 9's in all the subjects I didn't enjoy, and probably could've pushed through with maths a-level also - there's loads of people who don't love their subjects, but still work hard and succeed to go on to do what they want at Uni.

Someone told me at the time while choosing A-levels that I'd need maths for anything in life, and I wasn't bothered, since I was initially really confident about not taking maths, telling myself that a low grade in maths would've been less useful than a high grade in a different subject, but now I'm reconsidering my decision. At this point, frantically trying to change subject would probably do more harm than good, but I still feel so stuck, it feels pointless stressing about something that is probably already too late to change. I don't want to end up with a rubbish degree/job simply because I was too lazy to take maths.


It's understandable to feel unsure about not taking maths at A-level, especially when considering future career paths. However, it's important to remember that there are many degree and career options that do not require maths, and success can be achieved in any subject with hard work and dedication.
Original post by waterenjoyer
I can't help but feel unsure about not taking maths. At the time of picking a-levels, I was told over and again to just pick subjects I enjoyed and that I thought I would be good at, so I picked english lit, politics and history, thinking any degree/career choices would just follow. I was fairly confident about wanting to do law, but apart from that I had no idea of what path I wanted to go down.

Now, I still think I want to do law, but I'm fairly anxious about the lack of alternatives. My subjects have realistically limited me to something humanities/law based and not much else. (on the bright side, they're all respected subjects). If I had just done maths, I could've opened up so many doors, especially to higher-paying degrees like business management etc.

The problem is that, for the most part I didn't really enjoy maths and struggled with it for a long time, but once I put some work in (and with a little bit of emergency tutoring) I went from getting 6's to an 8 in the actual GCSE. I'm sure that I could've gotten a good grade - I got 8's and 9's in all the subjects I didn't enjoy, and probably could've pushed through with maths a-level also - there's loads of people who don't love their subjects, but still work hard and succeed to go on to do what they want at Uni.

Someone told me at the time while choosing A-levels that I'd need maths for anything in life, and I wasn't bothered, since I was initially really confident about not taking maths, telling myself that a low grade in maths would've been less useful than a high grade in a different subject, but now I'm reconsidering my decision. At this point, frantically trying to change subject would probably do more harm than good, but I still feel so stuck, it feels pointless stressing about something that is probably already too late to change. I don't want to end up with a rubbish degree/job simply because I was too lazy to take maths.

A-level Maths was the hardest subject I've ever done. It made my Year 13 an absolute nightmare. I wouldn't recommend unless you're aiming at a STEM course, in which case its basically mandatory even if the course requirements don't specify it. Since you're aiming for Law, if you're serious about Law, don't regret not taking Maths. If you're not serious about Law and want to do STEM, you need Maths.

Don't think Maths is just something you can do on the side. Its not possible. It requires so much more time and energy investment than other subjects (to achieve a similar grade) its crazy. But I won't claim that it wasn't useful. AS-level (A1 level) integration/differentiation can crop up in various places, exponentials and logs have hugely wide applications, and Statistics is crucial and will really help in life (Mechanics... less so).

Having to study A-level Maths noticably reduced my grades on my other A-levels.
(edited 11 months ago)
Original post by waterenjoyer
I can't help but feel unsure about not taking maths. At the time of picking a-levels, I was told over and again to just pick subjects I enjoyed and that I thought I would be good at, so I picked english lit, politics and history, thinking any degree/career choices would just follow. I was fairly confident about wanting to do law, but apart from that I had no idea of what path I wanted to go down.

Now, I still think I want to do law, but I'm fairly anxious about the lack of alternatives. My subjects have realistically limited me to something humanities/law based and not much else. (on the bright side, they're all respected subjects). If I had just done maths, I could've opened up so many doors, especially to higher-paying degrees like business management etc.

The problem is that, for the most part I didn't really enjoy maths and struggled with it for a long time, but once I put some work in (and with a little bit of emergency tutoring) I went from getting 6's to an 8 in the actual GCSE. I'm sure that I could've gotten a good grade - I got 8's and 9's in all the subjects I didn't enjoy, and probably could've pushed through with maths a-level also - there's loads of people who don't love their subjects, but still work hard and succeed to go on to do what they want at Uni.

Someone told me at the time while choosing A-levels that I'd need maths for anything in life, and I wasn't bothered, since I was initially really confident about not taking maths, telling myself that a low grade in maths would've been less useful than a high grade in a different subject, but now I'm reconsidering my decision. At this point, frantically trying to change subject would probably do more harm than good, but I still feel so stuck, it feels pointless stressing about something that is probably already too late to change. I don't want to end up with a rubbish degree/job simply because I was too lazy to take maths.

You could do a foundation year at uni. Foundation year exists if the A Levels you chose did not match the course requirements of the ‘normal degree’, you can do the extra year at uni to get you up to speed for the course. The entry requirements for foundation year is often just having the good A Levels grades.
(edited 11 months ago)
Reply 9
Original post by Cedric Fred
It's understandable to feel unsure about not taking maths at A-level, especially when considering future career paths. However, it's important to remember that there are many degree and career options that do not require maths, and success can be achieved in any subject with hard work and dedication.


cheers gpt

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