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Joint Honours Degree with Law and Psychology

Is it possible to do a joint honours degree at Oxbridge with Law and Psychology. In the past my ambitions were set to go on and become a Solicitor and go to law school and I have chosen to do Economics, Sociology and Psychology for A level. However, recently I wanted to go into the psychological aspect of crime and maybe do something in forensic psychology and now I am indecisive on the career I want. Is it possible for me to do both law and psychology and if I want to I can choose between Law and Forensic psychology?
Original post by user3412
Is it possible to do a joint honours degree at Oxbridge with Law and Psychology.

If you check the web sites for either the University of Oxford or the University of Cambridge you will note that neither offer a "Law and Psychology" joint honours degree, so the simple answer is "No". Sorry.
Original post by user3412
Is it possible to do a joint honours degree at Oxbridge with Law and Psychology. In the past my ambitions were set to go on and become a Solicitor and go to law school and I have chosen to do Economics, Sociology and Psychology for A level. However, recently I wanted to go into the psychological aspect of crime and maybe do something in forensic psychology and now I am indecisive on the career I want. Is it possible for me to do both law and psychology and if I want to I can choose between Law and Forensic psychology?

As above, no. Their joint honours courses are clearly listed on their websites. Note if you want to go into forensic psychology, you need a BPS accredited psychology degree - you do not need any legal background. Also to note, you can become a solicitor (or barrister, for that matter) with any degree subject - the SRA polled solicitors a few years ago and found 50% did a non-law undergraduate degree. Therefore if you want to keep your options open, you should aim for psychology (anywhere, not specifically at Oxford or Cambridge).

In terms of psychology at Oxford or Cambridge, there are some things to be aware of. Firstly, the courses heavily emphasise the nature of psychology as an experimental science, and focus much more on the scientific and research sides than any applied elements of forensic or clinical psychology. Secondly, as a result of this focus, you will likely be at a disadvantage without any science A-levels. Thus, I would suggest focusing on psychology courses elsewhere that are less science focused (granted the BPS accreditation requirements mean you'll study a certain amount of scientific content in any psychology degree, but some courses focus on this a lot - like Oxbridge, UCL, and KCL for example).

Finally, note that becoming a forensic psychologist is very competitive - after doing your BPS accredited undergraduate degree, you have to do a postgraduate qualification which is very competitive to get onto and I gather it's not uncommon for applicants so have several years of relevant psychological experience if not also additional masters degrees and/or a PhD (likewise for clinical psychology). So just be aware, simply doing a psychology undergraduate by itself is not enough to become a forensic psychologist, and there is more involved in that overall training programme than just the undergraduate degree (including a major bottleneck after said undergraduate degree).

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