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    do your teachers refer to notes when in lessons ? im finding it hard to transfer my ability to do maths to teaching maths. when faced with a lesson, , i struggle to think how to give a clear definition of the topic.i know how to do the maths behind the concept but, for example how to describe what is proportion , or vectors,logs,diif equations, etc. of course i know how to do these things but to explain what they are is tough.
    i feel stupid having to write down good definitions of these concepts and refer to them in lessons. Does anyone have a teacher who relies on notes? Do you think less of them if they do ?
    thanks to anyone kind enough to reply.
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    My opinion isn't influenced either way if they use notes - provided they only use them sporadically. Copying down notes without any chance to do maths with others leads to boredom.
    It's often a good idea to use a small number of notes as opposed to doing it out of your head. If you solely teach from you're head your're likely to teach them exactly what you know, rather than what the syllabus requires (meaning they will know more or less than they should).
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    mine did for some modules. I prefer teaching by explanation but I never really struggled with those modules because they oveerlapped with physics, and I didn't mind.
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    Using notes is good as a back up when your brain freezes. Eventually you will be able to do it without and find the best method that feels comfortable for you.
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    (Original post by Gaz031)
    My opinion isn't influenced either way if they use notes - provided they only use them sporadically. Copying down notes without any chance to do maths with others leads to boredom.
    It's often a good idea to use a small number of notes as opposed to doing it out of your head. If you solely teach from you're head your're likely to teach them exactly what you know, rather than what the syllabus requires (meaning they will know more or less than they should).
    Gaz031 underlines an important truth in this second paragraph.

    There is a big difference between knowing WHAT you have to teach for a certain syllabus, and knowing HOW to teach certain topics, and indeed how to DO certain procedures.

    In maths, your students would expect you to know (without notes) HOW to differentiate A^x, but maybe not to remember if you're required to prove this for P3/C4....

    Also, there is no real point in proving, in a lesson, that you can remember how to tackle a particular difficult example, if you have the notes in front of you.

    There are certain parts of certain courses that you SHOULD be able to teach without notes, but it depends on the course and the subject. I taught French for ∞ years, and knew, and still know, all of the grammar back to front, upside down, no errors. I could answer any question about any grammatical aspect of the language without notes, and this gave me a certain... I think the word is cred.

    But teaching a particular set text, or a particular discussion subject, was different. Some set texts I knew almost by heart, but not others. For the latter, I was not afraid to refer to my notes.

    Last, if you emit real confidence and (most important) enthusiasm about what you're teaching, all the rest will be unimportant...

    Enjoy it.

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    2 of my maths teachers are well crap

    1 is quite good

    Just teach the syllabus in order of easiest - hardest

    It's best to teacher relevant information imo, some teachers teach harder stuff which don't come up in the exam. I found that to be a waste of time in trying to get good exam results.

    Set quite a bit of homework, and make people do quite a bit of classwork and so you can see who is doing well and who isn't, thus helping the ones who arent doing well.

    Go through exam papers and set similiar questions / past papers.

    Them methods is what i found the best way to learn.
 
 
 
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Updated: January 29, 2005

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