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Students on campus at the University of Warwick
University of Warwick
Coventry

Dropping out of physics degree to do management at warwick

Hi TSR,

The UCAS deadline is coming close and I'm wondering if anyone can give me their opinion on my problem. I'm currently in my first year studying physics and I'll be honest. I hate it. I honestly do not think I will cope with doing it for the next 2 years. I'm having a really difficult time at university and it hasn't helped my stress.

I actually originally wanted to go into management or economics but chose physics because my father really wanted me to go into physics as he sees it as a respectful course.

My end goal isn't to be a physicist, my goal is to work in IB or consulting. I've seen that Warwick Business School has loads of graduates going to work in large companies so I'm just wondering if there really is a point in doing a degree in physics when my goal isn't to be a physicist.

Any feedback from anybody would be appreciated.
To go into investment banking or management consulting you can do any degree subject, as long as you do it at a target university (like Warwick). If business is what interests you academically then by all means reapply to that - you could also just as well do art history or something if that is interesting to you, if you apply to target unis such as Warwick, UCL, Oxbridge, Imperial and LSE (granted the latter two don't offer art history in this example but for other subjects....!).
Students on campus at the University of Warwick
University of Warwick
Coventry
Original post by artful_lounger
To go into investment banking or management consulting you can do any degree subject, as long as you do it at a target university (like Warwick). If business is what interests you academically then by all means reapply to that - you could also just as well do art history or something if that is interesting to you, if you apply to target unis such as Warwick, UCL, Oxbridge, Imperial and LSE (granted the latter two don't offer art history in this example but for other subjects....!).

Thanks for the reply! What happens in the process of reapplying whilst at university? Do I have to drop out to apply?
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks for the reply! What happens in the process of reapplying whilst at university? Do I have to drop out to apply?

You don't have to drop out to reapply (except Oxbridge usually, but that's a moot point now anyway) and it's usually similar as before. You need an academic reference (from your uni or your school) a personal statement, and to declare all attempted qualifications (this includes your current uni study).

The only difference is if you want to change course at your current uni - you may be able to do that internally without formally applying through UCAS. You should talk to your personal tutor about that if that's your plan.
Original post by artful_lounger
You don't have to drop out to reapply (except Oxbridge usually, but that's a moot point now anyway) and it's usually similar as before. You need an academic reference (from your uni or your school) a personal statement, and to declare all attempted qualifications (this includes your current uni study).

The only difference is if you want to change course at your current uni - you may be able to do that internally without formally applying through UCAS. You should talk to your personal tutor about that if that's your plan.

I see, thanks for the response. On one hand I feel like this is the best way to go, on the other I feel like I’m just escaping difficulty. I went into physics without much thought. I thought to myself, physics was my highest scoring subject in a level and maybe I’d enjoy it but once I got to university it changed. It was highly mathematical and I just didn’t enjoy sitting in lectures listening to physics. My goal at the end of the day is to go work in consulting or IB. I don’t know if there’s a point of me dragging myself doing physics when my goal isn’t to be a scientist.

Any response would be greatly appreciated
Original post by Anonymous
I see, thanks for the response. On one hand I feel like this is the best way to go, on the other I feel like I’m just escaping difficulty. I went into physics without much thought. I thought to myself, physics was my highest scoring subject in a level and maybe I’d enjoy it but once I got to university it changed. It was highly mathematical and I just didn’t enjoy sitting in lectures listening to physics. My goal at the end of the day is to go work in consulting or IB. I don’t know if there’s a point of me dragging myself doing physics when my goal isn’t to be a scientist.

Any response would be greatly appreciated

If you don't enjoy the subject, then it's definitely worth seeing if you can change. Whether that involves changing uni or just changing subject within your current uni, depends on you and your interests. Take it from me - trying to force yourself through a degree you don't enjoy just doesn't work! Better to quit while you're ahead and still can get a full degree funded (which if you leave any time after first year, you have to self-fund at least some of the new degree programme - so finishing up first year then switching is the best time to do it if you must)!
Original post by artful_lounger
If you don't enjoy the subject, then it's definitely worth seeing if you can change. Whether that involves changing uni or just changing subject within your current uni, depends on you and your interests. Take it from me - trying to force yourself through a degree you don't enjoy just doesn't work! Better to quit while you're ahead and still can get a full degree funded (which if you leave any time after first year, you have to self-fund at least some of the new degree programme - so finishing up first year then switching is the best time to do it if you must)!


Thanks for the response. It's been hard, I've felt down and all I do when I go home is complain and talk about how much I hate my course and my university. I really want to graduate here since it's a G5 university but in my heart I know I am not enjoying it and do not think I can firm this for 3 years. I will ask my personal tutor and see what they say and what their advice is.

Honestly, I'm just afraid of the talk I'll get. I'll be someone who dropped out of a G5 university studying physics and change it to a management degree. I think it'll look like I'm escaping difficulty but I'm more career orientated. I don't really want to go studying for a degree that has no relevance to the job I want.

I'm sorry if I come off as whining and complaining but it's really hard being in the position I'm in and I don't know what to do.
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks for the response. It's been hard, I've felt down and all I do when I go home is complain and talk about how much I hate my course and my university. I really want to graduate here since it's a G5 university but in my heart I know I am not enjoying it and do not think I can firm this for 3 years. I will ask my personal tutor and see what they say and what their advice is.

Honestly, I'm just afraid of the talk I'll get. I'll be someone who dropped out of a G5 university studying physics and change it to a management degree. I think it'll look like I'm escaping difficulty but I'm more career orientated. I don't really want to go studying for a degree that has no relevance to the job I want.

I'm sorry if I come off as whining and complaining but it's really hard being in the position I'm in and I don't know what to do.

I've no idea what a G5 uni is, but in any case you can discuss with your personal tutor if there are any degrees at your current institution you could transfer to internally.

That said I'd point out a) most graduates end up having done a degree with no relevant to their job b) most jobs don't have any degree which is relevant to them and c) a management degree isn't especially relevant to investment banking - some content may be, but much of it likely won't be specifically relevant.
Original post by artful_lounger
I've no idea what a G5 uni is, but in any case you can discuss with your personal tutor if there are any degrees at your current institution you could transfer to internally.

That said I'd point out a) most graduates end up having done a degree with no relevant to their job b) most jobs don't have any degree which is relevant to them and c) a management degree isn't especially relevant to investment banking - some content may be, but much of it likely won't be specifically relevant.

With internal transfers isn't it hard at this time?
Original post by Anonymous
With internal transfers isn't it hard at this time?


Some year 2's are still oversubscribed, but you've nothing to lose by asking the question. It'd still be the easiest route away from your current course.
Original post by Anonymous
With internal transfers isn't it hard at this time?


Original post by Admit-One
Some year 2's are still oversubscribed, but you've nothing to lose by asking the question. It'd still be the easiest route away from your current course.


I was thinking in terms of transferring into first year of a new course at the same uni, to begin next year. Not to transfer mid year :smile:
Original post by Admit-One
Some year 2's are still oversubscribed, but you've nothing to lose by asking the question. It'd still be the easiest route away from your current course.


Original post by artful_lounger
I was thinking in terms of transferring into first year of a new course at the same uni, to begin next year. Not to transfer mid year :smile:


Thanks, i've scheduled a meeting with my personal tutor to discuss about this.

I honestly would love that. I want a break from university before starting a new course. Is it really rare though? The departments are different.
Original post by artful_lounger
I was thinking in terms of transferring into first year of a new course at the same uni, to begin next year. Not to transfer mid year :smile:


Of course, they are looking at year 1 entry, doh!

If anything, that improves their chances as things are relatively back to normal now with regards to incoming grades.

As above, nothing to lose by asking!
Original post by Anonymous
Thanks, i've scheduled a meeting with my personal tutor to discuss about this.

I honestly would love that. I want a break from university before starting a new course. Is it really rare though? The departments are different.


Very variable. You'll still need to meet the normal requirements., and they may require you complete the year and get a minimum average %. They may just say you need to reapply through UCAS. Only way to find out is by asking the question!
Original post by Admit-One
Of course, they are looking at year 1 entry, doh!

If anything, that improves their chances as things are relatively back to normal now with regards to incoming grades.

As above, nothing to lose by asking!

PRSOM :biggrin:
Original post by Anonymous
I honestly would love that. I want a break from university before starting a new course. Is it really rare though? The departments are different.


You'd be looking at joining the new cohort in September anyway. But if you felt that you needed longer and wanted to re-join in Sept 2024, you can always ask your tutor about the possibility of a temporary withdrawal. Just find out what your options are really.
Original post by artful_lounger
Very variable. You'll still need to meet the normal requirements., and they may require you complete the year and get a minimum average %. They may just say you need to reapply through UCAS. Only way to find out is by asking the question!

Yeah, I meet the requirements and the subjects "requirements" and "recommended". I hope they don't ask to get a minimum % because I do not like my course and I don't really want to sit through the lectures teaching a subject that I dislike now.

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