The Student Room Group

Crashing highers

Guysss when is the best time to ask my teacher if i can crash a higher?
i want to crash higher history but i don't take any other social subject. help me out!
It's generally a good idea to speak with your teacher as soon as possible if you're interested in taking a higher level course. This way, you'll have plenty of time to plan and prepare for the additional workload.

Your teacher will likely be able to provide more specific guidance on the best time to discuss this with them, as they will be familiar with your academic progress and any other commitments you may have.

Keep in mind that taking a higher level course can be a significant undertaking, and it's important to be prepared for the additional work and responsibility that it may involve. Make sure you're confident in your ability to handle the added workload before making the decision to take on a higher level course.

It's also a good idea to consider whether taking a higher level course in History will be beneficial for your academic and career goals. If you're not planning on studying a social science or humanities subject in college or university, it may not be the best use of your time and energy.
Reply 2
Original post by helper1guy
It's generally a good idea to speak with your teacher as soon as possible if you're interested in taking a higher level course. This way, you'll have plenty of time to plan and prepare for the additional workload.

Your teacher will likely be able to provide more specific guidance on the best time to discuss this with them, as they will be familiar with your academic progress and any other commitments you may have.

Keep in mind that taking a higher level course can be a significant undertaking, and it's important to be prepared for the additional work and responsibility that it may involve. Make sure you're confident in your ability to handle the added workload before making the decision to take on a higher level course.

It's also a good idea to consider whether taking a higher level course in History will be beneficial for your academic and career goals. If you're not planning on studying a social science or humanities subject in college or university, it may not be the best use of your time and energy.


Hi I am interested in Law!
And what if I've done bad in my prelims? (I didn't know what prelims were until the last week before them) Will they not let me do it? Because I only revised for biology in that week and got a B and I think I'll do fine in my Nat5 exams hence now I am aware and have time or will the teacher decline my request?? Thank you
I am planning to study Nat5 History over the summer holidays.
Prelims, or preliminary exams, are typically taken at the end of the school year in Scotland and are used to assess students' progress and help them prepare for their final exams. While your grades on the prelims may be taken into consideration when you apply to university or other post-secondary programs, they are not typically the only factor that is considered.

If you're interested in studying Law at university, it's important to focus on doing your best in your final exams, known as National 5 exams in Scotland. These exams are typically more important than the prelims when it comes to university admissions, as they are the final assessment of your knowledge and skills in a particular subject.

It's also a good idea to start thinking about your university and career goals as early as possible, and to work on building a strong foundation of skills and knowledge that will help you to succeed. This might include taking relevant courses, participating in extracurricular activities, and seeking out opportunities for personal and professional development.

If you're concerned about your grades on the prelims, it might be helpful to talk to your teacher or a school counsellor about your concerns and see if they can offer any guidance or support. They may be able to suggest strategies for improving your performance on the final exams or help you to explore other options if you're not able to meet the requirements for your desired program of study.
Reply 4
Original post by helper1guy
Prelims, or preliminary exams, are typically taken at the end of the school year in Scotland and are used to assess students' progress and help them prepare for their final exams. While your grades on the prelims may be taken into consideration when you apply to university or other post-secondary programs, they are not typically the only factor that is considered.

If you're interested in studying Law at university, it's important to focus on doing your best in your final exams, known as National 5 exams in Scotland. These exams are typically more important than the prelims when it comes to university admissions, as they are the final assessment of your knowledge and skills in a particular subject.

It's also a good idea to start thinking about your university and career goals as early as possible, and to work on building a strong foundation of skills and knowledge that will help you to succeed. This might include taking relevant courses, participating in extracurricular activities, and seeking out opportunities for personal and professional development.

If you're concerned about your grades on the prelims, it might be helpful to talk to your teacher or a school counsellor about your concerns and see if they can offer any guidance or support. They may be able to suggest strategies for improving your performance on the final exams or help you to explore other options if you're not able to meet the requirements for your desired program of study.

Yeah I already got most of my prelim results and got over the minimum passing mark ,
will that affect my chance of crashing higher history? or will the teacher decide off my upcoming tracking reports?
Thank you
Original post by daliasmay
Yeah I already got most of my prelim results and got over the minimum passing mark ,
will that affect my chance of crashing higher history? or will the teacher decide off my upcoming tracking reports?
Thank you


It's generally a good idea to have strong grades in the subjects you're interested in taking at a higher level, as this can help you to be successful in the course and demonstrate your aptitude for the subject.

However, your grades on the prelim exams may not be the only factor that your teacher considers when deciding whether or not to allow you to take a higher level course. Other factors that may be taken into consideration include your overall academic performance, your attendance and participation in class, and your motivation and engagement with the subject.

Your teacher may also look at your tracking reports, which provide information on your progress and achievement in your current courses, as well as any feedback or recommendations from your current teachers.

It's generally a good idea to talk to your teacher about your desire to take a higher level course as soon as possible, so you have plenty of time to plan and prepare. They may be able to provide more specific guidance on the best course of action based on your individual circumstances and needs.
Reply 6
Original post by helper1guy
It's generally a good idea to have strong grades in the subjects you're interested in taking at a higher level, as this can help you to be successful in the course and demonstrate your aptitude for the subject.

However, your grades on the prelim exams may not be the only factor that your teacher considers when deciding whether or not to allow you to take a higher level course. Other factors that may be taken into consideration include your overall academic performance, your attendance and participation in class, and your motivation and engagement with the subject.

Your teacher may also look at your tracking reports, which provide information on your progress and achievement in your current courses, as well as any feedback or recommendations from your current teachers.

It's generally a good idea to talk to your teacher about your desire to take a higher level course as soon as possible, so you have plenty of time to plan and prepare. They may be able to provide more specific guidance on the best course of action based on your individual circumstances and needs.

What if they say no
Reply 7
Original post by helper1guy
It's generally a good idea to have strong grades in the subjects you're interested in taking at a higher level, as this can help you to be successful in the course and demonstrate your aptitude for the subject.

However, your grades on the prelim exams may not be the only factor that your teacher considers when deciding whether or not to allow you to take a higher level course. Other factors that may be taken into consideration include your overall academic performance, your attendance and participation in class, and your motivation and engagement with the subject.

Your teacher may also look at your tracking reports, which provide information on your progress and achievement in your current courses, as well as any feedback or recommendations from your current teachers.

It's generally a good idea to talk to your teacher about your desire to take a higher level course as soon as possible, so you have plenty of time to plan and prepare. They may be able to provide more specific guidance on the best course of action based on your individual circumstances and needs.


should i re ask later in the year if they say no
If your teacher says no to your request to take a higher level course, it's important to respect their decision and to consider their rationale for denying your request.

Depending on the reason for their decision, it might be a good idea to discuss ways that you can improve your performance or prepare for the higher level course. This might include seeking extra help or support, participating in extracurricular activities related to the subject, or working on building your skills and knowledge in other ways.

If you feel strongly about taking the higher level course and are committed to putting in the necessary effort and time, you could consider asking your teacher again later in the year, perhaps after you have had the opportunity to demonstrate your improved performance or preparation. It's important to approach the conversation in a respectful and constructive manner, and to be open to feedback and guidance from your teacher.

Ultimately, the decision to allow you to take a higher level course is up to your teacher, and it's important to respect their judgment and expertise.
Our school generally did not allow crashing of Highers in S5. The step up from NAT5 to Higher is significant in some subjects and the skills needed developed from the NAT5 course.

Crashing in S6 is allowed (with permission from the department head), as by then you will have been used to working at the Higher level in similar subjects and to apply those skills to another subject is possible.

Noone in my year crashed a Higher in S5, you would have needed a very compelling argument to get given permission which would include why it is necessary for your future plans and also how your past performance proves you are capable of it. B or less in prelims, or saying you didn't even know prelims existed (how did that even happen?) will not be in your favour to prove you are a capable student.

Higher courses will start June, as soon as your have finished your NAT5 exams so your teacher will have no evidence at the start of the Higher course to allow you to start it, they are unlikely to go on your promises of what you can achieve and more likely their decision will be based on your past efforts.

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