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any good information technology related courses with minimal progrmaming?

So I am not too interested in programming and ive been doing it for about 2 years (y13 and 1st year of uni) and I'm not too interested in learning it or persuing career wise, anyone know any courses offered by any uni that has minimal programming or no programming but is still IT related?
Original post by kye335
So I am not too interested in programming and ive been doing it for about 2 years (y13 and 1st year of uni) and I'm not too interested in learning it or persuing career wise, anyone know any courses offered by any uni that has minimal programming or no programming but is still IT related?


Programming is usually focused on software. If you want to do something IT related still, I would go for something like networking. Web design and UX are also sort of IT related, but they are more arty than IT.

Having said that, to get into the tech industry (not academic study or research), you don't need a degree in it. If I was going into networking and building hardware, I would look for a professional IT certification in it e.g. Network+

Is there a specific reason why the degree has to be IT related?
Reply 2
yeah I kind of want a balance with the artys bit I guess. I want it to be a degree qualification to experience uni life to be honest and to get broder knowledge in the field, compared to just studying networking which to my knowledge is more focused to one area of expertise. And yeah I want it to be IT related as I did an IT course before in sixthfrom and really enjoyed learning the contents taught.
Original post by kye335
yeah I kind of want a balance with the artys bit I guess. I want it to be a degree qualification to experience uni life to be honest and to get broder knowledge in the field, compared to just studying networking which to my knowledge is more focused to one area of expertise. And yeah I want it to be IT related as I did an IT course before in sixthfrom and really enjoyed learning the contents taught.


IT roles are generally specialist roles. So even if you have a general qualification, you will still be going to be using a small subset of what you know.

If you want to go into uni for the experience, then it's a very expensive way of going about it. It would be a lot cheaper if you just hang out with uni people and go through the same thing without the expensive price tag.

The jack of all trade IT course would be computer science. There are other alternatives such as computer engineering (which is more hardware focused) and computing degrees (not computer science). IT (again not computer science), and Information Systems (more of a management slant).

If you want something more artsy, then you are looking at UX and web design. The issue I have with these degrees is that you would never need them in order to go into UX and web design; more often than not, college level courses are enough to give you the necessary skills. After that, it's about refining your skills.
Reply 4
Original post by MindMax2000
IT roles are generally specialist roles. So even if you have a general qualification, you will still be going to be using a small subset of what you know.

If you want to go into uni for the experience, then it's a very expensive way of going about it. It would be a lot cheaper if you just hang out with uni people and go through the same thing without the expensive price tag.

The jack of all trade IT course would be computer science. There are other alternatives such as computer engineering (which is more hardware focused) and computing degrees (not computer science). IT (again not computer science), and Information Systems (more of a management slant).

If you want something more artsy, then you are looking at UX and web design. The issue I have with these degrees is that you would never need them in order to go into UX and web design; more often than not, college level courses are enough to give you the necessary skills. After that, it's about refining your skills.


Yeah, I get what you mean. Im doing computer science for my first year of uni and I dont really like it too much, especially because I didnt do computer science of alevel/gcse, so its all very different to me. But yeah, so what/where would you recommend to learn IT modules? I have looked at apprenticeships and I can already tell you theyre out of the window as they are far too competitive (trust me on this).

I think the one thing I do like about a IT related degree is that you get to learn diferent topics, and I think that exposure will generally help me as I want to be explore my options as I dont really know what specilism I want to go in when I do start looking for a job.
Original post by kye335
Yeah, I get what you mean. Im doing computer science for my first year of uni and I dont really like it too much, especially because I didnt do computer science of alevel/gcse, so its all very different to me. But yeah, so what/where would you recommend to learn IT modules? I have looked at apprenticeships and I can already tell you theyre out of the window as they are far too competitive (trust me on this).

I think the one thing I do like about a IT related degree is that you get to learn diferent topics, and I think that exposure will generally help me as I want to be explore my options as I dont really know what specilism I want to go in when I do start looking for a job.


I can't tell you per se, because I didn't do an IT degree. I am learning various aspects of IT through various courses, but they are generally focused on programming and the application of programming.

It's very difficult for me to recommend anything specific if the thing that's putting you off is programming since half of the modules will involve programming of some sort.
If you like to focus more on the hardware, then I would look into the engineering aspects (not necessarily software engineering though). When it comes to IT courses and engineering, you would be more focused on designing the components as opposed to the aesthetics of the computer, which is more to do with industrial design to my understanding.
Computer vision and graphics tend to be a good module for you to do; it involves a lot of maths though.

I also don't know how you feel about engineering maths. As you are currently doing computer science, I would presume that you have A Level maths and you're OK with it.
Reply 6
Original post by MindMax2000
I can't tell you per se, because I didn't do an IT degree. I am learning various aspects of IT through various courses, but they are generally focused on programming and the application of programming.

It's very difficult for me to recommend anything specific if the thing that's putting you off is programming since half of the modules will involve programming of some sort.
If you like to focus more on the hardware, then I would look into the engineering aspects (not necessarily software engineering though). When it comes to IT courses and engineering, you would be more focused on designing the components as opposed to the aesthetics of the computer, which is more to do with industrial design to my understanding.
Computer vision and graphics tend to be a good module for you to do; it involves a lot of maths though.

I also don't know how you feel about engineering maths. As you are currently doing computer science, I would presume that you have A Level maths and you're OK with it.

Oh, yeah I want to stay far from programming lol, yeah I do like hardware and troubleshooting things. Yeah about that... hate to break it to you but I didnt do maths in Alevels and Im not too do with numbers although I got a good grade in GCSE, I am not trying to do any form of maths now haha. I actually did a triple btec in IT in sixthform, which I thoroughly enojoyed and got D*D*D* :smile:
Original post by kye335
Oh, yeah I want to stay far from programming lol, yeah I do like hardware and troubleshooting things. Yeah about that... hate to break it to you but I didnt do maths in Alevels and Im not too do with numbers although I got a good grade in GCSE, I am not trying to do any form of maths now haha. I actually did a triple btec in IT in sixthform, which I thoroughly enojoyed and got D*D*D* :smile:

That pretty much throws most of my suggestions out of the window.

Let's go with the topics that you might not like to take:

Data - anything involving data in computer science often requires programming; if it's data structures and algorithms, maths is involved

Cryptography - usually involves mathematical algorithms

Ethical Hacking - programming involved

Anything involving engineering - maths involved

AI - normally a lot of programming and some maths involved

Business analysis - low level/GCSE maths

Data analytics - involves maths, although I cannot specifically say how difficult it would be



If you look for degrees that are more focused on IT, you might be able to avoid most of the above. If it's a joint degree with another subject (usually business management or something like that), you get the option of not having to directly deal with some of these, but they still want you to cover the main ones so it doesn't compromise the integrity of the degree.

The following is a list of IT roles that you can commonly find on job sites:

Computer systems manager

Network architect

Systems analyst

IT coordinator

Network administrator

Network engineer

Service desk analyst

System administrator (also known as sysadmin)

Wireless network engineer

Database administrator

Database analyst

Data quality manager

Database report writer

SQL database administrator

Big data engineer/architect

Business intelligence specialist/analyst

Business systems analyst

Data analyst

Data analytics developer

Data modeling analyst

Data scientist

Data warehouse manager

Data warehouse programming specialist

Intelligence specialist

Back-end developer

Cloud/software architect

Cloud/software developer

Cloud/software applications engineer

Cloud system administrator

Cloud system engineer

DevOps engineer

Front-end developer

Full-stack developer

Java developer

Platform engineer

Release manager

Reliability engineer

Software engineer

Software quality assurance analyst

UI (user interface) designer

UX (user experience) designer

Web developer

Application security administrator

Artificial intelligence security specialist

Cloud security specialist

Cybersecurity hardware engineer

Cyberintelligence specialist

Cryptographer

Data privacy officer

Digital forensics analyst

IT security engineer

Information assurance analyst

Security systems administrator

Help desk support specialist

IT support specialist

Customer service representative

Technical product manager

Product manager

Project manager

Program manager

Portfolio manager


See: https://www.aha.io/roadmapping/guide/information-technology/it-job-titles

In the work world where you don't rely on books as such, you might be hardpress to find a job that doesn't involve maths (or at least low level maths) or porgramming. If you are going to avoid those like the plague, then you're possibly looking at business analysis, systems/network, and possibly cybersecurity (depending if they require you to know cryptography and hacking) as areas in IT that you would probably want to get into (otherwise it's IT support and customer service, which I don't think you would like).
Anything involving data, development, engineering, cloud would inevtiably involve programming. Maths isn't that commonly used in IT, although you would need to know stats for data.

Having said that, I am not an expert in the fields, so you would probably be better off with a second opinion.

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