The Student Room Group

PLEASE HELP I HAVE Exams in 4days (university) and I’m mostly going to fail

Hi all. I’m a second year BA Accounting and Finance student, I’ve got 2 exams in 4 days time. The 2 modules Financial reporting and Peformance Management is really difficult. I’ve been watching lectures, but when I come to practice the questions I can’t do it. It’s sooo hard, everyone on my course is struggling too. Will I be kicked out? Is there a chance to resit? Or will you be kicked off the course. THIS IS AN EXTREMELY tough time in my life. Any advice would be greatly appreciated x
Original post by Has578854
Hi all. I’m a second year BA Accounting and Finance student, I’ve got 2 exams in 4 days time. The 2 modules Financial reporting and Peformance Management is really difficult. I’ve been watching lectures, but when I come to practice the questions I can’t do it. It’s sooo hard, everyone on my course is struggling too. Will I be kicked out? Is there a chance to resit? Or will you be kicked off the course. THIS IS AN EXTREMELY tough time in my life. Any advice would be greatly appreciated x


I'm surprised you're having this much problem with second year modules.

Financial reporting should be about carrying out certain calculations to put together a financial statement. What gets most people is balancing the balance sheet. Is this your main problem?

Performance management come under management accounting. It's mostly about KPIs and measuring how people perform. If you understand what the accountant is trying to measure and understand how the ratio is computed, you should be able to grasp the basics.

If you have to do a resit i.e. fail the overall module (not the exam), then the mark for your resit is usually capped at 40%. If you fail your resit, then you will have to redo the module next academic year (whilst paying for a year's tuition for it, I think). If you fail the module for a second year, then I think you get the boot.

In the meantime, I would go through as many practice questions and analyse the answers at the back of the book with a fine toothcomb. If you don't understand where you went wrong with your answers the first time round, then you haven't learnt anything that could improve your situation. If you are struggling, then I would try to ask people who are doing very well on the course for advice, if they are in your circle of friends.

If you haven't already, highlight the areas where you are weak in in those modules, look through the recommended reading (in this case, the textbooks are what you are after) in the unit outlines for the modules, hit the library short loan section, and go through the more basic practice questions until you have got the foundation right (do this in the next 1-2 days).

Worst case scenario, if the calculations are your issue, practice a number of calculations but double down on the essay questions. The calculation questions are where you get the most marks, but if you can't do the calculations, focus on where you can gain the most marks. Regurgitating theory should have been a key skill that you have picked up in first year.
The essay sections usually make up at least 40% of the exam paper. If you get the essay sections correct i.e. a 2:1 mark or 60%+, then we can at least can assume you have 24% of the marks available in the paper (40% of paper*0.6 grade=24) in the bag. You would then need at least 27% of the calculations (40% overall grade - 24% in the bag from essays = 16% of the marks remaining; 16%/0.6 of the paper for the calculations section = 27% of the calculations) to be correct in order for you to pass with 40% grade for the paper. This is assuming that the paper does follow a 60:40 divide in terms for mark allocations for calculations:essay in each paper.
If your modules have been more heavy on calculations, then I would be guessing the papers would be heavier on calculations e.g. a 80:20 split as opposed to a 60:40. If the modules are more about talking aspects, then we're probably looking at 60:40 still.
If you know how the exam papers are structured i.e. if the lecturers have told you, then you would know what to focus more on. If they haven't, then try to practice as many calculations as possible, but try to bank on as much as you can on marks from essay questions.

I cannot guarantee that the actual questions you will receive will be easier than what you get in your textbooks, but they should be roughly the same level of difficulty as what you are getting in seminars. If you are struggling with the stuff in seminars, then you have a lot of work on your hands.

With 4 days, there is little that I could recommend to help. Sun Tzu said to do what is hard when it's easy, so you won't have to do what's difficult when it's hard (or something along those lines).

For a better long term strategy, have study groups, talk to people smarter or have higher marks than you on the course, learn from others, go through the recommended reading.If you have things you don't understand, ask about them early.

If you have specific questions about how to do things, I might be able to offer pointers. However, if you don't give me specifics, it's very difficult for me to give appropriate advice.

The biggest thing I would tackle at this moment in time would be the biggest sticking points that you have in each module that would make the biggest difference in your understanding of the material and that would get you the most marks.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending