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Someone help me out with what to do

I wanted to do a law degree but my mum said I wouldn’t manage it, she has a law degree herself. So I said I wanted to do criminology instead, but then she said that it isn’t a good degree and is seen as a lesser version of a law degree, and people with a better degree like law will be chosen over criminology when it comes to a job. What do I do ? I’m not sure what job to do yet but something to do with crime and stuff.
Original post by RZTW
I wanted to do a law degree but my mum said I wouldn’t manage it, she has a law degree herself. So I said I wanted to do criminology instead, but then she said that it isn’t a good degree and is seen as a lesser version of a law degree, and people with a better degree like law will be chosen over criminology when it comes to a job. What do I do ? I’m not sure what job to do yet but something to do with crime and stuff.

You tell your mum that you want to apply for law, that that's what you're applying for, and that you'd appreciate her support. Then, regardless of her response, you apply for law. It's your life, not hers.
if law is your most preferred subject for a degree, then i say begin a law degree :smile:
Original post by RZTW
I wanted to do a law degree but my mum said I wouldn’t manage it, she has a law degree herself. So I said I wanted to do criminology instead, but then she said that it isn’t a good degree and is seen as a lesser version of a law degree, and people with a better degree like law will be chosen over criminology when it comes to a job. What do I do ? I’m not sure what job to do yet but something to do with crime and stuff.


It can be difficult when the people around us have strong opinions about the choices we make, especially when it comes to our education and future careers. However, ultimately the decision about what to study and what career path to pursue should be yours.

You mention that you are interested in studying criminology and that you want to work in a field related to crime. It's important to know that criminology is a legitimate field of study that is separate from law. Criminology is an interdisciplinary field that combines the study of sociology, psychology, and law to understand criminal behavior and the criminal justice system. It can provide a solid foundation for a career in criminal justice, law enforcement, research, and even public policy.

It's true that some employers might prefer candidates with degrees in law or related fields, but that doesn't mean that a degree in criminology would not be valuable to them as well. Having a criminology degree is an opportunity to have a greater understanding of crime and criminal behavior, which can be applied in many different fields. Many criminology graduates work in law enforcement, in research institutions and government agencies, in social services, and in the private sector, among other fields.

It's also important to note that the value of one’s degree is not determined by how well recognized is the degree itself, but on the experiences, skills and knowledge that student acquire throughout the course. The most important thing is to choose a degree that you're passionate about and that aligns with your interests and goals.

What I suggest is that you research more about criminology, the options and careers available with that degree. Also, you can reach out to people who are working in the field and ask them about their experiences and how their degree has helped them in their current role. This can give you a more realistic understanding of what you can expect from a career in criminology, and help you make an informed decision.
Reply 4
Original post by DataVenia
You tell your mum that you want to apply for law, that that's what you're applying for, and that you'd appreciate her support. Then, regardless of her response, you apply for law. It's your life, not hers.


I told her but she’s says that if I do her and my dad won’t be funding me towards it. They have to do that as the student loan won’t cover much. So I don’t really have a choice
Reply 5
Original post by RZTW
I wanted to do a law degree but my mum said I wouldn’t manage it, she has a law degree herself. So I said I wanted to do criminology instead, but then she said that it isn’t a good degree and is seen as a lesser version of a law degree, and people with a better degree like law will be chosen over criminology when it comes to a job. What do I do ? I’m not soure what job to do yet but something to do with crime and stuff.

there are many things in law. You live in the U.K. im guessing well in the U.S criminology is ranked 4 in the law program, it is very good here. But idk how it is there. So there are things like criminal investigation, crime scene investigators, etc... maybe look into those maybe you will like. Also if your mom won't let you do law and you like that. Something in forensics.
(edited 1 year ago)
Original post by RZTW
I told her but she’s says that if I do her and my dad won’t be funding me towards it. They have to do that as the student loan won’t cover much. So I don’t really have a choice


That sounds so weird. Why wouldn't they fund you? (Yes, they are disuading you from doing law, but I very much doubt them refusing to fund you for your degree will do that much; it's also ultimately your choice.)

I am not advocating this, but I would consider going out on a limb and go in with full funding for tuition fees and maintenance fees (possibly working on the side if you have time and if you are allowed to by your university).

There are alternative routes into law depending on which area of law you want to go into. The job profiles of the 2 most popular ones are detailed on the following pages:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/solicitor
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/barrister

For any other careers, I would see the following: https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-categories/law-and-legal
(As you can tell, most other careers in the legal field do not require a degree (let alone a law degree). Those that do tend to require you to be a solicitor or barrister before you can get promoted.)

As you can see, you can become a solicitor via law degree, CILEx, SQE, apprenticeship, or by doing a postgrad in law. Similarly, you can become a barrister via law degree, CILEx, or by doing a postgrad in law.

So if it's absolutely necessary, you can do a degree in a random subject then just do a GDL afterwards (if funding is really tight). A GDL is a one year degree and they should cost £9k or so, unless they decide to hike up the tuition fees later on.

On the other hand, law degrees are known to be tough, and it's rare for anyone to get above a 2:1 compared to other subjects.

If you are 100% sure that you want to do a law degree, then I would recommend for you to just go and do it.
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 7
Original post by MindMax2000
That sounds so weird. Why wouldn't they fund you? (Yes, they are disuading you from doing law, but I very much doubt them refusing to fund you for your degree will do that much; it's also ultimately your choice.)

I am not advocating this, but I would consider going out on a limb and go in with full funding for tuition fees and maintenance fees (possibly working on the side if you have time and if you are allowed to by your university).

There are alternative routes into law depending on which area of law you want to go into. The job profiles of the 2 most popular ones are detailed on the following pages:
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/solicitor
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-profiles/barrister

For any other careers, I would see the following: https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/job-categories/law-and-legal
(As you can tell, most other careers in the legal field do not require a degree (let alone a law degree). Those that do tend to require you to be a solicitor or barrister before you can get promoted.)

As you can see, you can become a solicitor via law degree, CILEx, SQE, apprenticeship, or by doing a postgrad in law. Similarly, you can become a barrister via law degree, CILEx, or by doing a postgrad in law.

So if it's absolutely necessary, you can do a degree in a random subject then just do a GDL afterwards (if funding is really tight). A GDL is a one year degree and they should cost £9k or so, unless they decide to hike up the tuition fees later on.

On the other hand, law degrees are known to be tough, and it's rare for anyone to get above a 2:1 compared to other subjects.

If you are 100% sure that you want to do a law degree, then I would recommend for you to just go and do it.


Okay thank you. If I did CILEX then an lpc or an SQE, in the end wouldn’t this just be as much work as doing a law degree, as I’m going to have to cover pretty much the same stuff?
Original post by RZTW
Okay thank you. If I did CILEX then an lpc or an SQE, in the end wouldn’t this just be as much work as doing a law degree, as I’m going to have to cover pretty much the same stuff?


SQE is pretty full on. Apparently it takes 5-6 years if you have a law degree and 6-7 if you don't (but you are still a graduate). See the following: https://www.prospects.ac.uk/jobs-and-work-experience/job-sectors/law-sector/solicitors-qualifying-examination-sqe#:~:text=Following%20the%20SQE%20route%2C%20law,graduates%20five%20to%20seven%20years. So yeah, you will be covering the same stuff.

CILEx is a professional qualification that would be th equivalent of a law degree at level 6 (if you work all the way up to level 6). You would need to complete Level 3 and Level 6. Level 3 is 12-18 months (1 -1.5 years) and Level 6 is 24-36 months (2-3 years). So if anything, it's like spending 3-4.5 years studying for law. See the following: https://www.cilex.org.uk/study/legal_practice_areas/general. This is usually the recommended path for those who don't want to go to uni and want to go into law through work.

CILEx + LPC (to become a solicitor) would more or less be the same as doing a law degree + LPC.

Thing is, they are starting to phase out the LPC for progressing to become solicitors as far as I know, and they are more likely to bring on SQE as the main route to become a solicitor. You will need to check with the updates with the SRA to see what they say.

The main challenge for anyone becoming a solicitor or barrister is securing a training contract. There are thousands of law graduates without work or floating around in the legal sector because they can't secure a training contract to become a solicitor or barrister. I don't need to tell you how competitive this is.
The thing with the SQE is that you need to be employed first before you can go on it, whereas the LPC doesn't mandate that (it's usually the equivalent of a postgrad diploma, which is a one year course after a law degree).

Just out of interest, why specifically a solicitor over other career paths?
Reply 9
Original post by MindMax2000
SQE is pretty full on. Apparently it takes 5-6 years if you have a law degree and 6-7 if you don't (but you are still a graduate). See the following: https://www.prospects.ac.uk/jobs-and-work-experience/job-sectors/law-sector/solicitors-qualifying-examination-sqe#:~:text=Following%20the%20SQE%20route%2C%20law,graduates%20five%20to%20seven%20years. So yeah, you will be covering the same stuff.

CILEx is a professional qualification that would be th equivalent of a law degree at level 6 (if you work all the way up to level 6). You would need to complete Level 3 and Level 6. Level 3 is 12-18 months (1 -1.5 years) and Level 6 is 24-36 months (2-3 years). So if anything, it's like spending 3-4.5 years studying for law. See the following: https://www.cilex.org.uk/study/legal_practice_areas/general. This is usually the recommended path for those who don't want to go to uni and want to go into law through work.

CILEx + LPC (to become a solicitor) would more or less be the same as doing a law degree + LPC.

Thing is, they are starting to phase out the LPC for progressing to become solicitors as far as I know, and they are more likely to bring on SQE as the main route to become a solicitor. You will need to check with the updates with the SRA to see what they say.

The main challenge for anyone becoming a solicitor or barrister is securing a training contract. There are thousands of law graduates without work or floating around in the legal sector because they can't secure a training contract to become a solicitor or barrister. I don't need to tell you how competitive this is.
The thing with the SQE is that you need to be employed first before you can go on it, whereas the LPC doesn't mandate that (it's usually the equivalent of a postgrad diploma, which is a one year course after a law degree).

Just out of interest, why specifically a solicitor over other career paths?


Okay I will have a look at the options. If it’s just covering the same stuff and similar, why is my mum saying going to uni and doing a law degree is much harder? Or is it not? I’ve always found a solicitor to be what I’m most interested in doing
Original post by RZTW
Okay I will have a look at the options. If it’s just covering the same stuff and similar, why is my mum saying going to uni and doing a law degree is much harder? Or is it not? I’ve always found a solicitor to be what I’m most interested in doing


As I have not done any of the above (I hate law with a passion), I cannot say for certain and I think you would be better off hearing it from someone else.

In terms of getting a law degree, it's rumoured to be really hard to get high marks. People are not kidding when they say this. You can get first class grades in any other subject, but can still be knocked down to a 2:1 in law unless you are really exceptional. See the following stats:
https://www.legalcheek.com/2017/02/law-is-the-hardest-degree-to-get-a-first-in/
https://www.studyinternational.com/news/uk-law-hardest-subject-get-first-class-degree-study/

Even if the material is the same, it doesn't necessarily mean the marking will be nor how you approach the subject. You will need to speak to someone who has done both the law degree and the other qualifications to get a better idea.

If getting high grades is a mandatory requirement for you to secure the role, then getting a degree in another subject then doing the SQE wouldn't make much of a difference. I would prioritise getting the role over the degree in this case, but it's really down to your own personal preference.

If your mum has contacts who are solicitors, it's probably a good idea to get a second opinion from them first.

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