The Student Room Group

NEA- history

Does anyone know how to structure an NEA?
thanks!!!
Original post by bella604
Does anyone know how to structure an NEA?
thanks!!!


An NEA, or non-exam assessment, in geography and earth sciences can vary depending on the specific assignment and the subject, but it may have a similar structure as the previous answer. Here is an example of the structure of an NEA in Geography and Earth Sciences that may include:

Introduction: This should provide background information on the topic, state the aim and objectives of the NEA, and outline the structure of the report.

Literature review: This section should provide an overview of the existing literature and research on the topic. It should also identify any gaps in the existing research that the NEA aims to fill.

Methodology: This section should provide details on how you collected and analyzed the data for your NEA, like fieldwork methods, data collection techniques, laboratory experiments, and any equipment or software used.

Results: This section should present the findings of your research or investigation, including any data, statistics, or observations. It should also include any relevant maps, graphs, images, or figures.

Analysis and Interpretation: This section should interpret the results of your research or investigation and analyze them in relation to existing theory, concepts, and models. It should also consider any limitations of the study and any implications of the findings.

Conclusion: This section should summarize the main findings of the NEA and draw any conclusions. It should also recommend any further research or investigations that could be carried out in the future.

Reference List: This should include a list of all the sources used in your report and should be formatted according to the referencing style specified by your school or institution.

If you have any other questions or need any clarifications, feel free to ask!
Reply 2
Is this the same for history?
Hi, I'm doing my NEA on the atomic bomb and whether it was justifiable or not. Anyone have any primary sources/historical interpretations?
Original post by bella604
Is this the same for history?


The structure of an NEA for history may vary depending on the specific task or project, but generally it should include the following elements:

A clear research question or topic: The NEA should have a clear focus that guides the student's research and analysis.

A research plan: The student should have a plan for how they will research and gather information for their NEA.

Analysis and evaluation of primary and secondary sources: The student should use a variety of sources, such as historical documents and secondary sources, to support their arguments and analysis.

A written component: The student should present their findings and analysis in a written format, such as an essay or report.

A presentation component: The student should present their findings and analysis in a clear and organized format, such as a poster or oral presentation.

In terms of the structure of a Geography's NEA it could be similar to the structure of History's NEA but with a focus on geographical data and analysis. For example, a Geography's NEA may include a focus on spatial analysis, data interpretation, and mapping techniques.

It's worth noting that the structure of an NEA may vary depending on the specific task or project and the guidance of the instructor. It's always best to check the instruction and rubric provided by the instructor for a specific guidance.
Original post by someonerandom23
Hi, I'm doing my NEA on the atomic bomb and whether it was justifiable or not. Anyone have any primary sources/historical interpretations?


The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is a complex and controversial topic with a wide range of primary sources and historical interpretations. Here are a few primary sources and historical interpretations that may be useful for your NEA:

Primary Sources:

The "Truman Diaries" written by President Harry S. Truman, which provide insight into his decision-making process regarding the use of atomic bombs.

The "Manhattan Project: The Decision" a document that includes the Interim Committee's recommendation that the atomic bomb be used against Japan, and the minutes of the meetings in which this decision was made.

The "Hiroshima Diary" written by Dr. Michihiko Hachiya, which is a first-hand account of the immediate aftermath of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

The "Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Casualty Report" which is a detailed account of the physical and psychological effects of the atomic bombing on the people of Nagasaki.

Historical Interpretations:

"The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb" by Gar Alperovitz, which argues that the atomic bombing was not necessary to end the war and that other alternatives were available.

"Hiroshima: Why America Dropped the Atomic Bomb" by Richard B. Frank, which argues that the atomic bombing was a necessary and justifiable action to end the war and save lives.

"The Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki" by Mark Selden, which provides a comprehensive overview of the historical context, decision-making process, and aftermath of the atomic bombings.

"The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II: A Collection of Primary Sources" edited by Dennis Wainstock, which includes a wide range of primary sources related to the atomic bombing, including official documents, letters, and first-hand accounts.

It's always a good idea to consult a variety of primary sources and historical interpretations to gain a well-rounded understanding of the topic and to form your own opinion on the justification of the atomic bombing.
Original post by Curious_Bilawi
The atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is a complex and controversial topic with a wide range of primary sources and historical interpretations. Here are a few primary sources and historical interpretations that may be useful for your NEA:

Primary Sources:

The "Truman Diaries" written by President Harry S. Truman, which provide insight into his decision-making process regarding the use of atomic bombs.

The "Manhattan Project: The Decision" a document that includes the Interim Committee's recommendation that the atomic bomb be used against Japan, and the minutes of the meetings in which this decision was made.

The "Hiroshima Diary" written by Dr. Michihiko Hachiya, which is a first-hand account of the immediate aftermath of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

The "Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Casualty Report" which is a detailed account of the physical and psychological effects of the atomic bombing on the people of Nagasaki.

Historical Interpretations:

"The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb" by Gar Alperovitz, which argues that the atomic bombing was not necessary to end the war and that other alternatives were available.

"Hiroshima: Why America Dropped the Atomic Bomb" by Richard B. Frank, which argues that the atomic bombing was a necessary and justifiable action to end the war and save lives.

"The Bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki" by Mark Selden, which provides a comprehensive overview of the historical context, decision-making process, and aftermath of the atomic bombings.

"The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II: A Collection of Primary Sources" edited by Dennis Wainstock, which includes a wide range of primary sources related to the atomic bombing, including official documents, letters, and first-hand accounts.

It's always a good idea to consult a variety of primary sources and historical interpretations to gain a well-rounded understanding of the topic and to form your own opinion on the justification of the atomic bombing.

oh my goodness thank you so much!!!
Reply 7
thank you so much! how did you find those primary sources and interpretations?

Quick Reply

Latest