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RAF Application

Hi
Looking for advise for my son.
He has just been refused into the RAF based on him having to have oral steriods for asthma symptoms, not asthma , years ago, probably 4+ years ago.
We can appeal but has anyone else had anything like this? Can you reapply again?
Any advise we would be grateful for.
Reply 1
Reapplication depends on the wording of the medical rejection letter, and what the rules are in future. And yes, in general terms there are conditions where symptoms and/or previous treatment can be a bar to entry, because there could be circumstances on training or on the job that could be a trigger.

Rhetorical question, but can you address the reason for the rejection by providing evidence that is new or in addition to that in your son's medical records?
I understand for eg a pilot rule certain medical requirements must be met. I have a comprehensive psych history and I'm worried that some of it may disadvantage me? Do you know of anyone with a long-term/chronic condition that requires daily medication and yet has stilled passed medical? I'm on beta blockers and sleeping meds, but I've volunteered in UA and survived and thrived because I was in a MDT and in dynamic environment - which suits me I know it's all very much a case by case basis and fortunately I'm only in a reserve role.
Original post by cashewnut
I understand for eg a pilot rule certain medical requirements must be met. I have a comprehensive psych history and I'm worried that some of it may disadvantage me? Do you know of anyone with a long-term/chronic condition that requires daily medication and yet has stilled passed medical? I'm on beta blockers and sleeping meds, but I've volunteered in UA and survived and thrived because I was in a MDT and in dynamic environment - which suits me I know it's all very much a case by case basis and fortunately I'm only in a reserve role.


The only advice I can give you is to make them tell you 'no', It's worth a try although I will say I know how strict the RAF are on medical conditions and especially around the pilot role (which is unbelievably competitive) it is very unlikely that they would allow you to pass, there are full documents explaining which conditions specifically are a immediate blacklist somewhere on the internet. I know people who are licensed PPL and even airline pilots who tried to join the RAF and were rejected for a small condition they suffered from temporarily as a child, and despite a decade passing the RAF still told them no.
Original post by toon2121
there are full documents explaining which conditions specifically are a immediate blacklist somewhere on the internet

JSP950 - specifically the section on "Respiratory Pre-entry" will show you what the criteria are.
Reply 5
Original post by Okanagan
JSP950 - specifically the section on "Respiratory Pre-entry" will show you what the criteria are.

Don't ask someone to self-diagnose. That may not be the most up-to-date set of Regulations and is intended for doctors, not civilians. The only way to find out is to apply.

Former RAF Recruiter.
Original post by Surnia
Don't ask someone to self-diagnose. That may not be the most up-to-date set of Regulations and is intended for doctors, not civilians. The only way to find out is to apply.

Former RAF Recruiter.

There is however a big difference between your assumption of self diagnosis and mine of the candidate being aware what the criteria the people making the decisions are given. It may just make it clearer why a decision has been made to see those guidelines in black and white.

Without access to the criteria which may have been used for rejection, how can they get their own doctor to review whether their medical records suggest they'd meet those criteria or not if they want to appeal, which they mention as a possibility?

And how can they know whether a reason for rejection may be time limited and expired for a new application (and when that might be) - for example the clause "Those who have experienced symptoms or taken, or been prescribed any form of treatment within the last 4 yrs". If you don't know how that criteria is specified you won't know what that exclusion period is, and when it would have passed.

So in the circumstances access to those defined criteria is is appropriate to understand the decision, and the future options available.
Reply 7
Original post by Okanagan
There is however a big difference between your assumption of self diagnosis and mine of the candidate being aware what the criteria the people making the decisions are given. It may just make it clearer why a decision has been made to see those guidelines in black and white.

Without access to the criteria which may have been used for rejection, how can they get their own doctor to review whether their medical records suggest they'd meet those criteria or not if they want to appeal, which they mention as a possibility?

And how can they know whether a reason for rejection may be time limited and expired for a new application (and when that might be) - for example the clause "Those who have experienced symptoms or taken, or been prescribed any form of treatment within the last 4 yrs". If you don't know how that criteria is specified you won't know what that exclusion period is, and when it would have passed.

So in the circumstances access to those defined criteria is is appropriate to understand the decision, and the future options available.

Reasons are given in the medical rejection letter.
Reply 8
Original post by ssmbedwards
Hi
Looking for advise for my son.
He has just been refused into the RAF based on him having to have oral steriods for asthma symptoms, not asthma , years ago, probably 4+ years ago.
We can appeal but has anyone else had anything like this? Can you reapply again?
Any advise we would be grateful for.


Unfortunately that’s just how the RAF is because they can afford to be. They have thousands of applications for pilot roles and even if it’s not asthma they will just be very picky to narrow the list. Appealing it will NOT work. Applicants have been rejected over childhood hayfever and a past ear infection. It’s just part of the application process and a way to cut down on the list.

Becoming an airline pilot and passing the class 1 medical is definitely possible though, as they will check your past medical history and conduct their own tests to check if your suitable, and any minor issues from the past will be looked at. It’s not part of a selection process so if your overall fit and healthy you’ll be issued a class 1 medical which you can use to apply for a flight training organisation.
(edited 1 year ago)
Reply 9
Original post by cashewnut
I understand for eg a pilot rule certain medical requirements must be met. I have a comprehensive psych history and I'm worried that some of it may disadvantage me? Do you know of anyone with a long-term/chronic condition that requires daily medication and yet has stilled passed medical? I'm on beta blockers and sleeping meds, but I've volunteered in UA and survived and thrived because I was in a MDT and in dynamic environment - which suits me I know it's all very much a case by case basis and fortunately I'm only in a reserve role.


Honestly any psych history in Aviation will likely be a no. Not just the RAF but in the airline world also.

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