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What subjects should I drop? -nursing,childcare jobs

I would like to take on a job in a childrens hospital/ nursery/ primary school in the future. What subjects should I drop? I currently take maths, english (usual), hft, spanish, art, pe, modern studies, biology and chemistry. Please give me ideas/ guides as iam not too sure about this, I know for a definite I want to keep biology and chemistry though as I feel like this could get me into the medical field if childcare fails!
what level of qualification is this?
Original post by Maddiepatty4
I would like to take on a job in a childrens hospital/ nursery/ primary school in the future. What subjects should I drop? I currently take maths, english (usual), hft, spanish, art, pe, modern studies, biology and chemistry. Please give me ideas/ guides as iam not too sure about this, I know for a definite I want to keep biology and chemistry though as I feel like this could get me into the medical field if childcare fails!


Have you looked at the job profile for hospital/nursurey/primary school work?

I'm starting to believe teachers don't actually help pupils do any of the research on this (either that or they are more clueless than the pupils).

Before you go choose your subjects, you want to look into the profiles of the jobs that you want to do. The following websites tend to be good for this:

https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers (the main sections you are looking for are Social Care and Healthcare)

https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/sectors (the main sections are Childcare, Social Care, and Medical)

After that, you would look at how to get into the fields and whether you need specific degrees and qualifications. These qualifications can sometimes require them to be specific and approved by profesional bodies (if they do, there are usually links to the professional body's website where you can search for the list of approved degrees - saves you doing more work than necessary).
From there, you look at what the entry requirements are for those degrees and qualifications.
After checking the entry requirements, you can then decide on which subjects to take or drop.


If you are looking for work in the medical field in children's hospital, then I recommend Paediatrician, which essentially requires you to have a medical degree (what you are hinting at). You will need to do an NMC approved degree in child nursing to become a child nurse. Alternatively, look into health play specialist (no comment).

If you want a more psychological angle to your work, then you're looking at Psychotherapy, Developmental Psychologist, Counsellor, Play Therapist. Typically you would be looking at either a degree in psychology and further training and qualifications, depending on which specific role you are looking into. You can do college level courses e.g. Counselling at Level 3 for some of these jobs to start off with, but a psychology degree is preferable if you want to keep your options open.

For nursery settings, you are looking at Childminder, Nanny, Nusery Manager, Nursery Worker, Playworker. None of these roles will require you to have anything above GCSEs, but you can go onto do college and degrees in related areas. You can also become a Early years teacher, but you would need an undergraduate degree in a subject related to early childhood studies or child development.

In a school setting, school nurse, primary teacher, teaching assistant. Teaching assistants don't require any qualifications. School nurses require you to become a nurse in the first place (see paragraph on medical field). And a primary teacher require a qualification with QTS in primary education.

Out all of the above, you would need A Level Biology and Chemistry for paediatrician and possibly A Level Psychology or Biology for some psychology degrees (most won't ask you for specific A Level subjects). For all other degree and college level courses, they won't care what A Levels that you do so long you get high enough grades.

So to boil it down, you would need biology and chemistry to play it safe. Otherwise, everything else is up to you. As far as I am concerned, you should pick the subjects that you can get the highest grades in and ideally interested in.

Personally, I think if you decide to go into childcare, it's going to be easier than getting into the medical field. If anything, I would prioritise getting into the medical field first, and should that fail then go into childcare. The bottleneck is the degree in medicine; once you have a medical degree, you can go and transfer in almost any other field should you need to (further degrees, conversion courses, college courses, etc.), but if you go into any other field, it's going to be a lot harder to go into medicine (the graduate entry into medicine is notoriously difficult and it's a lot easier to go into at undergrad level).

If your subjects are in reference to GCSEs, then I would only consider maths, English Language, biology, and chemistry being mandatory. All the other subjects are not that critical. This is because certain colleges have specific unnecessary grade requirements for their science A Levels, even though you don't need specific grades to do any A Level subject.
For degree and adult college courses, you are looking at maths and English language being the key ones. If they do look at your GCSE grades, it would be the number of GCSEs above grade 5, 6, or 7 depending on the college or university as well as the specific course.

If the subjects are A Levels, I think the third A Level should be an academic subject as well as one you can do well in and is a suibject you're interested in. This is because the word on the street is that universities offering medical degrees tend to favour the more academic A Level subjects e.g. Maths, English (lit or lang), and Spanish. I don't know what modern studies and hft (food tech?) are, but it's not likely that would be taken that serious as A Levels (they should be fine as GCSEs though). PE and Art are not academic per se, even though they should be considered as such.
Personal favourite is Maths for your third A Level subject (it's respected and required for a number of degree course should you decide to change your mind), but it's not to everyone's liking.
Original post by MindMax2000
Have you looked at the job profile for hospital/nursurey/primary school work?

I'm starting to believe teachers don't actually help pupils do any of the research on this (either that or they are more clueless than the pupils).

Before you go choose your subjects, you want to look into the profiles of the jobs that you want to do. The following websites tend to be good for this:

https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/explore-careers (the main sections you are looking for are Social Care and Healthcare)

https://www.careerpilot.org.uk/job-sectors/sectors (the main sections are Childcare, Social Care, and Medical)

After that, you would look at how to get into the fields and whether you need specific degrees and qualifications. These qualifications can sometimes require them to be specific and approved by profesional bodies (if they do, there are usually links to the professional body's website where you can search for the list of approved degrees - saves you doing more work than necessary).
From there, you look at what the entry requirements are for those degrees and qualifications.
After checking the entry requirements, you can then decide on which subjects to take or drop.


If you are looking for work in the medical field in children's hospital, then I recommend Paediatrician, which essentially requires you to have a medical degree (what you are hinting at). You will need to do an NMC approved degree in child nursing to become a child nurse. Alternatively, look into health play specialist (no comment).

If you want a more psychological angle to your work, then you're looking at Psychotherapy, Developmental Psychologist, Counsellor, Play Therapist. Typically you would be looking at either a degree in psychology and further training and qualifications, depending on which specific role you are looking into. You can do college level courses e.g. Counselling at Level 3 for some of these jobs to start off with, but a psychology degree is preferable if you want to keep your options open.

For nursery settings, you are looking at Childminder, Nanny, Nusery Manager, Nursery Worker, Playworker. None of these roles will require you to have anything above GCSEs, but you can go onto do college and degrees in related areas. You can also become a Early years teacher, but you would need an undergraduate degree in a subject related to early childhood studies or child development.

In a school setting, school nurse, primary teacher, teaching assistant. Teaching assistants don't require any qualifications. School nurses require you to become a nurse in the first place (see paragraph on medical field). And a primary teacher require a qualification with QTS in primary education.

Out all of the above, you would need A Level Biology and Chemistry for paediatrician and possibly A Level Psychology or Biology for some psychology degrees (most won't ask you for specific A Level subjects). For all other degree and college level courses, they won't care what A Levels that you do so long you get high enough grades.

So to boil it down, you would need biology and chemistry to play it safe. Otherwise, everything else is up to you. As far as I am concerned, you should pick the subjects that you can get the highest grades in and ideally interested in.

Personally, I think if you decide to go into childcare, it's going to be easier than getting into the medical field. If anything, I would prioritise getting into the medical field first, and should that fail then go into childcare. The bottleneck is the degree in medicine; once you have a medical degree, you can go and transfer in almost any other field should you need to (further degrees, conversion courses, college courses, etc.), but if you go into any other field, it's going to be a lot harder to go into medicine (the graduate entry into medicine is notoriously difficult and it's a lot easier to go into at undergrad level).

If your subjects are in reference to GCSEs, then I would only consider maths, English Language, biology, and chemistry being mandatory. All the other subjects are not that critical. This is because certain colleges have specific unnecessary grade requirements for their science A Levels, even though you don't need specific grades to do any A Level subject.
For degree and adult college courses, you are looking at maths and English language being the key ones. If they do look at your GCSE grades, it would be the number of GCSEs above grade 5, 6, or 7 depending on the college or university as well as the specific course.

If the subjects are A Levels, I think the third A Level should be an academic subject as well as one you can do well in and is a suibject you're interested in. This is because the word on the street is that universities offering medical degrees tend to favour the more academic A Level subjects e.g. Maths, English (lit or lang), and Spanish. I don't know what modern studies and hft (food tech?) are, but it's not likely that would be taken that serious as A Levels (they should be fine as GCSEs though). PE and Art are not academic per se, even though they should be considered as such.
Personal favourite is Maths for your third A Level subject (it's respected and required for a number of degree course should you decide to change your mind), but it's not to everyone's liking.

Thankyou! This is quite helpful, iam just a little anxious that I’ll be working at McDonald’s or some other low paying jobs as i suck at maths. Iam decent/ good at other subjects though!
Original post by Maddiepatty4
Thankyou! This is quite helpful, iam just a little anxious that I’ll be working at McDonald’s or some other low paying jobs as i suck at maths. Iam decent/ good at other subjects though!


I'm a fan of maths, and I think maths should be a requirement for most jobs. Then again, I am biased.

Most jobs that you will come across will require GCSE maths for basic numeracy skills. To what calibre you need to be proficient in it will depend on the specific job.

Contrary to popular belief, there are only a handful of jobs that would require maths at A Level standard or higher:

Physicist (particularly theoretical physics)

Mathematician

Most areas of engineering (if that; mostly the theory requires a lot of maths)

Actuarial science (actuary) and financial mathematics (quants, financial engineering)

Data scientist and data analyst (questionable considering most of it is automated and you don't really use that high level of stats in practice)

Teacher of maths at A Level or higher

Computer scientists (not used in tech in industry; these people are more like researchers)

Statistician

Economist (possibly if you are more into modelling, but less so if you're in econometrics which is just stats)

Bioinformatician specialising in the quantitative sides of the job (the other side involves more biology), although a lot of it in practice is just stats



So long you are not looking to work in these areas (which I presume you are based on your post), you are more or less fine with just GCSE maths. If anything GCSE maths is a bit of an overkill for most jobs.

For medicine, you might be required to learn a bit about logarithm (according to certain rumours) and it doesn't hurt to have A Level maths as your third A Level (it's respected), but by no means is it required. In practice, medicine involves virtually no maths just a lot of figures (possibly some arthimetic).
For anything related to psychology, I would be laughing if people think it involves maths en par with engineering or the like. The only area that you would involve maths of any sort (to my understanding) is in the research modules where you will learn about stats that possibly push you a bit into AS Level maths. You will come across the 'harder' bits of stats in biology and possibly chemistry A Levels.
Education degrees generally don't involve maths beyond GCSE as far as I know, unless someone changed the syllabi recently.

If you've got a reasonable grade (I'm thinking 6 or 7, but some are willing to go as low as 4) at GCSE in maths then you should be fine for most parts. If you're good in other subjects (I'm hoping you mean Cs or above at A Level), then you should be fine (for medicine however, you're looking at least straight As at A Level, and it's going to be competitive).

Also, please do not make working at McDonald's sound or imply as something derogatory. It's a respectable job like any other, and in fact you can get students and people who achieved high grades working there.
Likewise, just because the job is low paying doesn't mean the people doing them are dumb or lack opportunities. For one, a number of the jobs listed above in areas that you want to work in do not have high salaries/rates of pay. A lot of these people who work in these areas are highly educated and require advanced degrees. A number of these people chose to go into these jobs despite the low pay because of how rewarding the jobs are or because it fulfil their needs. If anything, they are underpaid and under appreciated for their work.
Second, a number of the jobs or careers listed might seem to have high salaries on the surface, but require long hours at low rates of pay and take on a lot of responsibilities.

If you are looking for careers that involve high pay and high rates of return for the time spent, you are looking at all the wrong ones.

Please do not be insulting. A living is still a living, and workers are still people.

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